#1
I went in my local GC yesterday and was quite disappointed. Every Taylor guitar I played sounded terribly tinny. I know that the Taylor highs are not for everyone, but my cousin has a Taylor 114 that is absolutely fantastic: I love the brightness. I generally like bright guitars, but the ones I played just sounded like they were made out of metal. Whats the deal here? I love the Taylors that friends of mine own, but the ones off the rack did not sound anything like them. Do guitars need some time to "break in" or something? Thanks
#2
I would venture to guess that the strings were all dead. that's one of the problems I hear about many GC's. they never change the strings on floor models.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#3
Quote by CaParker96
I went in my local GC yesterday and was quite disappointed. Every Taylor guitar I played sounded terribly tinny. I know that the Taylor highs are not for everyone, but my cousin has a Taylor 114 that is absolutely fantastic: I love the brightness. I generally like bright guitars, but the ones I played just sounded like they were made out of metal. Whats the deal here? I love the Taylors that friends of mine own, but the ones off the rack did not sound anything like them. Do guitars need some time to "break in" or something? Thanks
Taylor used to ship with "bronze" strings, (sometimes known as "brass"_. In any case an 80/20 alloy. These are bright, and if you like,"tinny", from the jump. In spite of the fact I use brass strings on some of my guitars, they're thin, brittle, and annoying as hell when you first put them on.

Taylor now ships with phosphor bronze, a mellower sound. However, these are "Elixir" brand, and you simply just not like their sound character.

So, possibly a case of "newish old strings" at play.

Another possibility is an overly bright listening room. Given Taylor's rep for really bright guitars, if a room is brighter than are you used to, and the guitar is a lot brighter than you're used, it's very likely to leave a bad impression. But face it, Taylor guitars are tuned to, "cut through the mix".

In fact there's an ad blurb at M'sF from a proud Taylor owner. Basically he states, "sometimes I just want to play rhythm, and the guitar's too bright for that, so I put these much mellower strings on". (I forget the brand, sorry).

Taylor's current, "ships with", string line up: http://www.taylorguitars.com/blog/taylor-support/faq-string-types-and-gauges

Bottom line though, if you have a very bright, hard surfaced, playing area, for example a gas station repair bay, it makes a good case for leaving the Taylor at home, and grabbing the Martin.
#4
Thank you guys very much! That makes a lot of sense. I never thought about the room making a difference on the sound. I figured it probably had something to do with the strings, given that I usually love the Taylor highs. Thanks!
#5
Quote by stepchildusmc
I would venture to guess that the strings were all dead. that's one of the problems I hear about many GC's. they never change the strings on floor models.

This is the reason Taylor ships with Elixirs. Not everyone likes Elixirs though and many find them bright and "tinny"
#6
Quote by kurtlives91
This is the reason Taylor ships with Elixirs. Not everyone likes Elixirs though and many find them bright and "tinny"


Sure do. many new guitars come with coated light guage strings these days, and most sound thin and stringy to me. The dreads sound particularly bad, and if I was seriously thinking of spending big $ on one, I would ask the shop to put on a set of uncoated phos bronze mediums.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
Sure do. many new guitars come with coated light guage strings these days, and most sound thin and stringy to me. The dreads sound particularly bad, and if I was seriously thinking of spending big $ on one, I would ask the shop to put on a set of uncoated phos bronze mediums.
Actually Taylor, (at least according to their website), uses medium strings on their biggest bodied guitars.

To reiterate: http://www.taylorguitars.com/blog/taylor-support/faq-string-types-and-gauges
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 22, 2014,
#8
Quote by Captaincranky
Actually Taylor, (at least according to their website), uses medium strings on their biggest bodied guitars.

To reiterate: http://www.taylorguitars.com/blog/taylor-support/faq-string-types-and-gauges

yeppers..mediums on the big boys from the GS on up and lights on the GA's on down.
I do prefer D'addario coated PB's on most of my taylors except for the 324..that one only sounds good to me with elixirs.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
Actually Taylor, (at least according to their website), uses medium strings on their biggest bodied guitars.

To reiterate: http://www.taylorguitars.com/blog/taylor-support/faq-string-types-and-gauges


A good idea, more companies should do it, especially on dreads. They still sound stringy to me though. I'm going to take my vernier calipers next time I head down to the shop.
#10
Some Taylor models are definitely brighter than others. Some models have maple backs and sides which are notoriously brighter than the rosewood and other models. However, one of their biggest sellers is the 614ce and it has a big leaf maple back and sides. If you're playing in a band than this guitar would definitely be heard in the mix. If you're playing at home unplugged this might not appeal to you. I have a 614ce that was very bright when I bought it but it has mellowed down nicely. I have been using Elixir strings since they came on the scene and I haven't found anything that compares to them IMHO. Next time you go to GC take someone with you who can play well and just listen to different guitars and you may get another impression of the Taylor line