#3
Quote by Will Lane


No.

Quote by Alease Garnett
Hey guys, what is the best scale for finger practice?


The answer is "one you're going to use". The more important thing in terms of physical facility is how you practice it.

For the record as well: running scales is only useful as far as getting the shape under your fingers, once you've got a scale down pretty well and you know the physical placement of the notes a more useful thing to do is use it to make music. Improvise, come up with licks, write songs, whatever. The important thing is to get the sound in to your head; until you have that a scale might as well be entirely useless.
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Quote by Master Foo
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#5
Quote by Will Lane
I think AG wanted exercises to build finger strength, which is why I suggested chromatic. You use all 4 fingers.

But post was vague, so I unno.


It's useless though, there's no point playing anything that isn't 100% usable and musical.

Before anyone says anything I'm totally aware that the chromatic scale is used in some fantastic pieces of music... but they are so few and far between that devoting it practice time is pointless until you definitely need it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
It's useless though, there's no point playing anything that isn't 100% usable and musical.

Before anyone says anything I'm totally aware that the chromatic scale is used in some fantastic pieces of music... but they are so few and far between that devoting it practice time is pointless until you definitely need it.


Well you don't have to play live every one of your exercises, if AG just needs something for finger strength a chromatic scale works well. Having finger strength helps to be able to use other scales you might actually use live.

There is also a guitarist-grip product that has 4 individual buttons for your 4 fingers that use a spring's resistance to build up the strength in the fingers. I'm sure that could help as well, but you can't play it :p
Last edited by Will Lane at Sep 22, 2014,
#7
Quote by Will Lane
Well you don't have to play live every one of your exercises, if AG just needs something for finger strength a chromatic scale works well. Having finger strength helps to be able to use other scales you might actually use live.

There is also a guitarist-grip product that has 4 individual buttons for your 4 fingers that use a spring's resistance to build up the strength in the fingers. I'm sure that could help as well, but you can't play it :p


The idea of finger strength being something guitarists need to develop is flawed. Nearly every single healthy adult has more than enough strength to do all the fretting they need before they even start; it doesn't take much muscle power at all to fret a string, even on a bass. It's almost infinitely more about technique than it is about the strength of the muscles used.

If we're talking about finger independence then running chromatics is, again, largely pointless. It's very easy to run a standard chromatic scale in such a way that doesn't aid independence at all and there's only so much to be gained from it anyway. More to the point, you can gain everything that can be gotten from running chromatics that will almost never get used in real music from playing actual music. This is the crux of the issue: there is no point running chromatics when you could be learning actual music and getting the same, if not better, mechanical practice.

Those grip master things are dumb and stupid and dumb. The most efficient way of getting better at playing guitar is to play guitar.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
Quote by Alease Garnett
Ok, to be more specific / clarify. would the E major scale be good finger practice for blues?


Go with E-minor and learn the scale over the whole neck.


I really like going up scales like this:

e------------5-7-8------------7-8-10-------------8-10-12--
B-3//5-6-8----------6-8-10------------8-10-12-------------

Really helps you use all 4 fingers.
#10
I find legato practice really helps,Specially for fingers 3 and 4,I like to get a ii v i vi progression in my head(but you can think of any chord sequence you know) and i practice the scale which fits over each chord using only legato and 3 and 4 notes per string depending where you are.This practice also helps me with playing over the changes(switching scales for each chord)so it's good for a few techniques at once.I think helps me greatly as it's not just mindlessly running up and down a pattern,You have to think about each chord but also good for finger dexterity as you have to hit the correct note for the chord wherever you are on the fretboard.