#1
I've been playing guitar for a little over a year now and I still play kinda dirty sounding (self-taught). You can hear the screech sound from sliding off strings sometimes, other strings continuing to ring, etc. I was wondering:
A) What is the best way to mute strings while still playing so they don't ring while playing. Is there a specific technique to letting off strings?

B) How to stop the screechy sound.

I have an Epi LP and an Eastwood GP, I play on a Spider IV Line 6
#2
Relax your fingers more. The more skill you build up the more you can relax your fingers. Your getting a loud pull off noise because your finger isnt doing a relaxed release, which would mute the string as your finger tip pulled off.
#3
The screechy sound like you call it is highly dependent on your sound settings. But if you slide over a string you will hear it somehow even more with a distorted guitar. This is part of the sound characteristics of a string instrument and not necessarily something bad. The more you play the more you will learn to controll it. Its very hard to describe with words how to mute strings you don't wanna play. But a good hint is to play often with an amp and not just with a "nacked" guitar. The amplification will reveal a lot more unwanted noise then the natural mere acoustic forcing you to pay more attention to it. To make it short. If you wanna learn how to play with a distorted guitar play with a distorted guitar. Unfortunatel it is a lot easier to controll a clean guitar when it comes to unwanted noise.
Last edited by HellToKitty at Sep 22, 2014,
#4
Thanks for the advice guys.

@HelltoKitty - I do play often with an amp and I play with distortion. Sometime when I play power chords you can hear that annoying screech as I slide or change chords.
#5
Watch this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIEnzboW0Hc

It should cover pretty much all the questions you have about controlling unwanted strings ringing but if you have anything else to ask then please do so.
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#6
You need to focus on two things:

See your right hand as a noise gate, controlling the noise of the lower strings
See your left hand as a noise gate to control the noise of the higher strings

If you don´t use right hand thumb muting for the lower strings - do so, to keep all lower strings quite (you can search for thumb muting on youtube - it will take a while to get used to)

Have your index finger angled a bit, slightly touching the higher strings at all times and thereby keeping them quiet.

By implementing these two techniques, you can use a very distorted sound and only hear the notes your playing - no sloppy mess!

Hope that helps!
Last edited by SongwritersShed at Sep 25, 2014,
#7
You guys did help! I appreciate the responses. I'm working on a riff, during a certain part I hammer on/pull off a half step, slide down a full step, repeat that 3 times.

With every slide is that annoying screech. On my epi the action is rather high and on my eastwood my action is low. When I do that riff on my epi the screech is loud as ****. On my eastwood its not so bad but still noticeable. Any suggestions on how to improve on this technique?
#9
Quote by Will Lane
You shouldn't have too bad of a screech if a note is being played on the string... Any chance you could record it?


I just got the galaxy 4 and haven't figured out how to send videos or upload them yet lol. So no but its when I slide.

I'll try to upload a video in the near future,
#10
Thanks i started playing the guitar recently and the tips helped me a lot
#11
Quote by ImDesigner
Thanks for the advice guys.

@HelltoKitty - I do play often with an amp and I play with distortion. Sometime when I play power chords you can hear that annoying screech as I slide or change chords.


Instead of lifting your fingers off when you change chords, relax your fingers so that they are still touching the strings but aren't fretting any notes. This will mute the string, you'll notice if you play the string you just hear an empty sounding pluck noise instead of an actual note. Then you fret and play the next chords, after you've muted the original chord. It will take practice to be able to do this comfortably and quickly.

You'll probably see a huge reduction in excess noise if you play with as much relaxation as possible in all your muscles (especially hands, arms and shoulders). Also don't press too hard with your fretting hand on the strings, since this will ever so slightly change the pitch of the fretted notes.
#12
Quote by Will Lane
You shouldn't have too bad of a screech if a note is being played on the string... Any chance you could record it?


Also I do not mean a harmonic

http://www.daddario.com/DADProductDetail.Page?ActiveID=3769&productid=13&productname=EXL110_Nickel_Wound__Regular_Light__10_46&sid=63848524-b7cd-4eb0-be33-f33779bd95f6

^Those are the strings I use, I only get the noise on my E(low)/A/D strings.
#13
I think it all comes down to your technique. The more your able to relax your fingers the less screeching you'll hear. What i mean exactly is as you relax your fingers on the neck without fully pulling off, it will effectively mute the strings. It doesnt matter which strings, pickups, amp, pedals, None of that. Good luck with it!
#14
Thumb muting is really effective, if your style is primarily picking fast. If you want to use palm muting for its sound, then you have to watch how well you stay in contact with the bridge, and how to reach out to pick the strings. Left hand wise, you first finger can mute the treble-side strings. Test yourself by picking those strings, to determine how hard you need to this (doesn't need strength). You can cheat by tying a rag around the neck below the area you want to play in ... can get very clean legato like that ... but I wouldn't recommend that as the solution!

When you take a fretting finger off a string, which direction does your finger go. Verticallyaway from the plane of the neck? Towards the floor slightly? Or what.

The biggest thing you can do is slow down to almost turtle crawl, and watch and listen for what movement is triggering the problem. I mean one note per click at say 40 bpm.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Oct 3, 2014,
#15
I understand muting now. This thread gave me good technique advice to handle that. Its just the sliding screechy sound that I need help with. Like say I slide on a power chord on my E and A string. In the midst of my slide you can hear my fingers sliding across through the amp. Maybe I play too quietly volume wise (15 watt line 6) or I'm doing something wrong I think lol. I've tried to play as light as possible but it still presents itself.

Like my goal is to keep the slide sound without the screechy
#16
Quote by ImDesigner
I understand muting now. This thread gave me good technique advice to handle that. Its just the sliding screechy sound that I need help with. Like say I slide on a power chord on my E and A string. In the midst of my slide you can hear my fingers sliding across through the amp. Maybe I play too quietly volume wise (15 watt line 6) or I'm doing something wrong I think lol. I've tried to play as light as possible but it still presents itself.

Like my goal is to keep the slide sound without the screechy


That's different. If you're playing A5 say (on bottom two strings), and then D5 (up 5 frets still on bottom two strings), then if you don't want the slide to be heard, lift your fingers off the strings, slightly, move, and then refret and play again.

If you do want the slide, then maybe you're taking too much pressure off as you slide? Now you want to be in contact with each fret as you slide.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Oct 5, 2014,
#17
I never thought about muting when I first started playing guitar.
I still don't.
It's all just comes with time (it will come quicker if you practice muting, which you are!).
But yes, it's the subtle movements with your hands that just come second nature.
#18
Quote by tomasujhelyi
I never thought about muting when I first started playing guitar.
I still don't.
It's all just comes with time (it will come quicker if you practice muting, which you are!).
But yes, it's the subtle movements with your hands that just come second nature.


You do realise how self-contradicting this post is, right?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.