#1
Well the headline makes this pretty obvious...I'd really like to be able to sing so I could get more depth into my recordings. The problem is that the internet is full of tutorials and guides and I 'm very skeptic since pretty much all of them offer different advices for different things and some of them are probably just dead wrong. If you're a singer or know about this stuff,(can't afford a vocal couch and I don't think we even have one here) could you please give me some tips or links? What should I practice first and what should I learn next?
I'm really into progressive metal like Dream Theater,Symphony X,TesseracT,Periphery and DTP. Especially Devin Townsend's diverse vocal style really appeals to me and I could really use same kind of approach in my own material,y'know,clean and raspy vocals with a bit of growls thrown in sometimes.

Help is greatly appreciated and I hope my english was clear enough...
#2
From what I've learned its BEST to start with clean vocals, then slowly incorporate a grittier rock sound. Focus on your range and what you can do, everyone has the ability to sing in a few octaves if they practice enough. If you rlly focus on what singing is, think of it like a stringed instrument like a chello. WHen you want to hit a low note, your throat has to incorporate for the pitch by adjusting its radius (getting tighter or looser) and your chest has to provide the air. Breathe in with your stomach, I learned how to do this quickly since I played trumpet for 8 years. Then, try and learn how to use your head voice which kind of starts off with a chest sound and then it cuts off, and your throat has to become tighter and match the pith perfectly. Try singing up and down scales as much as possible to get your range down.

Try to find your singing type, whether you are a baritone bass or tenor. I happen to be....bi sectional....im a bass with tenor qualities. I'm not great but I'd like to think I have a higher range than some. Hope this helped a bit, if not, just focus on singing all of the time and practice like its your main instrument for a few months.
#3
Quote by owen556
From what I've learned its BEST to start with clean vocals, then slowly incorporate a grittier rock sound. Focus on your range and what you can do, everyone has the ability to sing in a few octaves if they practice enough. If you rlly focus on what singing is, think of it like a stringed instrument like a chello. WHen you want to hit a low note, your throat has to incorporate for the pitch by adjusting its radius (getting tighter or looser) and your chest has to provide the air. Breathe in with your stomach, I learned how to do this quickly since I played trumpet for 8 years. Then, try and learn how to use your head voice which kind of starts off with a chest sound and then it cuts off, and your throat has to become tighter and match the pith perfectly. Try singing up and down scales as much as possible to get your range down.

Try to find your singing type, whether you are a baritone bass or tenor. I happen to be....bi sectional....im a bass with tenor qualities. I'm not great but I'd like to think I have a higher range than some. Hope this helped a bit, if not, just focus on singing all of the time and practice like its your main instrument for a few months.


Sure it's best to start with clean vocals, but I'd say singing extreme growls and screams would be the next step, when doing the gritty sound it's extremely easy to get too tense and that's the thing we want to avoid the most when singing.

Definitely should not think about the throat doing anything, that can lead to uncountable problems, also the throat doesn't get tight or loose. Your vocal chords work as strings in an instrument, they vibrate when air passes through it producing a note, and as in any string instrument, the thicker the strings, the lower the note, the thinner they are, the higher it goes. Your vocal chords are flexible, so they can get thicker or thinner and the muscles you use for doing so are pretty small, so when singing properly your throat will not get tighter or looser, it will remain relaxed all the time.

Even though breathing with the stomach is not the correct term it's the simplest way to explain. The correct term would be singing using the diaphragm.

If by cut off you mean that for a moment your produce no sound in a glissando you're doing it wrong. There should be no break when going from chest to head voice, if there's any it's probably because your larynx is raising the higher you go and that's a very bad thing (it's actually used a lot for tone purposes, but if you need to raise your larynx to reach a certain note you're probably going to strain a lot).

Finding the singing type is definitely not important, it's actually useless unless you're going to sing in a choir or something like that. By the way, there's no thing such a bass with tenor qualities, you're probably just a tenor. The vocal range helps finding the singing type, but it does not determine it, only because you can sing low notes does not mean you're a bass or a baritone.

The most important stuff to begin with would be:
-Stay relaxed- don't force yourself, the learning curve is pretty slow for most but trying to rush it won't make it any better. You can find very good exercises on the subject and knowing the right singing posture is a great way to begin with.
-Learn to take the most out of your diaphragm- breathing and more breathing exercises.
-Sing in pitch- you don't need to go too high or too low to begin with, just try to sing pitch.
-Try to keep a neutral larynx position- if only I knew it when I was starting, this is one of the most important steps, it helps you find which muscles you really need to use to reach the notes you want. You'll latter decide if you prefer a lower or a higher larynx (in your style you're definitely going for a higher larynx) but starting to sing in any of them will make you limited and, of course, make you strain a lot.
-Only go for head voice when you're comfortable with chest voice- it's actually already covered in the first topic, but I think it's important to put emphasis to this since you'll find lots of people encouraging you to go for your head voice.
#4
Quote by GuitarManiac110
Well the headline makes this pretty obvious...I'd really like to be able to sing so I could get more depth into my recordings. The problem is that the internet is full of tutorials and guides and I 'm very skeptic since pretty much all of them offer different advices for different things and some of them are probably just dead wrong. If you're a singer or know about this stuff,(can't afford a vocal couch and I don't think we even have one here) could you please give me some tips or links? What should I practice first and what should I learn next?


Take lessons.

I honestly don't think singing can really be taught from books or youtube videos.