#1
I lack the money needed to get lessons from a teacher. Can anyone give me tips on what specifically I should practice (and how long for) to develop my guitar skills the quickest? Is it more important to learn scales/arpeggios, pieces or exercises? I've tried to make a practice plan before, but I can never seem to find the right balance.
#2
Are you sure you can't get a teacher? I don't mean the type you pay, if you have any friends that play the guitar for some time you could ask them to take a look at your playing every now and then. They shouldn't charge . I had a friend checking my playing out every couple weeks when I was starting out, so he could point out any mistakes and then I'd work on that. I'd find them myself sooner or later yeah, but it would have taken me much longer.

I can't give you tips on what specifically you should practice, because you didn't say what style you want to play. Something on the level of pop, punk, or more like jazz or metal? Also, what is your skill level (play any songs yet?) and how long have you been playing? Then we can give better advice
#3
Kind of depends on how 'seriously' you're taking it, or what you want to get out of it.

When I first started, I just picked a song I wanted to learn, and then tried it. If there was some technique I wasn't able to do, I'd look up exercises for that and work on it. And then I'd keep working on the song. Once I did that one, I found another song. Then another, etc.

I'm not saying my method is the 'best' method or whatever, but for a casual guitar player, I'd say it's pretty fine.
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#4
Quote by Baby Joel

When I first started, I just picked a song I wanted to learn, and then tried it. If there was some technique I wasn't able to do, I'd look up exercises for that and work on it. And then I'd keep working on the song. Once I did that one, I found another song. Then another, etc.


^This. I did this too, it kept me motivated more than sets of exercises and scales ever could in the beginner stage.
Last edited by Navi_96 at Sep 22, 2014,
#5
justinguitar
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#6
I'm an aspiring professional guitarist and the styles I play want to play the most would be jazz, blues and rock. I've been playing for a number of years but never really took it seriously (as in I've never sat down and properly practiced, mostly because I don't really know what to practice!).
#7
Quote by housebounce
I'm an aspiring professional guitarist and the styles I play want to play the most would be jazz, blues and rock. I've been playing for a number of years but never really took it seriously (as in I've never sat down and properly practiced, mostly because I don't really know what to practice!).


You get the most bang for you buck with books. Figure out specifically what you want to work on, ask for book recommendations on that particular topic. If you're struggling to figure out what you want to work on, post some examples of music that you wish you could play. "I want to be able to do this, I'm a relative beginner, how do I get there."

Another good source of lessons for the value-conscious is places like Jamplay, where you get a wide variety of lessons for a monthly fee. If you can't afford that fee, I'm skeptical as to whether or not you're serious about getting good at guitar - it's very reasonably priced. You'll still have to do some self-direction, but it's a good source of information and lessons if you're can't afford a private teacher.

This is assuming, of course, that you've worked through everything on JustinGuitar, which is the best source of free lessons on the net, IMHO.
#8
Quote by housebounce
I lack the money needed to get lessons from a teacher. Can anyone give me tips on what specifically I should practice (and how long for) to develop my guitar skills the quickest? Is it more important to learn scales/arpeggios, pieces or exercises? I've tried to make a practice plan before, but I can never seem to find the right balance.



At the start you need to spend some time tackling songs and spend some time on basic exercises.

Learn simple songs you like by ear and play along with the music. If you want to be good at guitar you should practice 2 hours a day minimum for a few years. If want to be adequate on guitar, than you can practice less than that.

There is no "quick" way to get good at guitar. The only route to greatness is playing A LOT. Great players practice a lot - there are no real shortcuts.
#9
After giving it some thought, I've sorted out my priorities based on what I want to get out of guitar and I came up with this plan:


1. Practice each guitar exercise for 5 minutes each.

http://www.jazzguitar.be/guitar_technique.html


2. Practice your piece you're currently learning for at least 30 minutes.


3.Get to know the fretboard by improvising over a backing track for 20 minutes.
Don't stick to scale shapes, learn the notes and know which ones to play to sound in key.


4. Spend the last 20 minutes revising scales and arpeggios, 10 minutes each.


I wouldn't necessarily do this all in one go, I would probably need a break in between. But does that sound like a decent plan for becoming a good guitarist?
#10
It's a start, but remember that scales and chords are only tools, not rules. Try to avoid getting stuck to a single scale shape or a single chord progression, experimentation and "rule breaking" are very important in jazz music.

And yes, taking a break is a good idea. Almost necessary, actually.
Last edited by guitar/bass95 at Sep 24, 2014,
#11
I am playing guitar for 10years and lack of a teacher and guide I could not join any classes can you please help me to play the blues music? thank you .
#13
Practise what you want to practise in order to play what you want!

Always look at your weak spots and improve those. This could be anything from lack of songs, sloppy skills, knowledge of notes, etc.

Make sure get basics down whatever that is but my take is like chords and song structure rather than lead.

The fun part of guitar is you are free to play whatever you want. When you get to playing with other people that is when the freedom gets less then you got arrangement, song writing and social people skills.

I started in the early '90's with TAB books of Metallica and my ears. Pretty soon I could follow along a record, cd or cassette tape in a TAB book knowing how it should sound. Then finding it on guitar later. Like palm muting, slides, power chords, bends etc.

Developing your ears is one of the most important things to make you stand out as a player and simply put on your favorite music and play along to got what you want out of it. This should be one of the early things to ever learn.

But what are the goals? Fast shred lead guitar or general metal leads: Troy Stetina Speed Mechanics. Tip get going from day 1 not 2 decades later though it still works at that time.

Blues? Listen to your favorite artists and play along.

Find what works for you and your goals.

Lastly guitar playing is a habit. In order for your mind to correctly store the practise keep doing it. The piece you are learning until it feels natural. Now if you are sloppy it might get stored as a sloppy habit and you will struggle with it forever.

Always practise with a metronome. Even the simple stuff benefits doing it regardless of tempo or if its a rhytm/lead piece.

Find the books, youtube etc. videos that speaks to you and take some serious study to make some headway.

Also remember this. The more you put in the more you get out!
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Nov 15, 2014,
#14
Quote by housebounce
I'm an aspiring professional guitarist and the styles I play want to play the most would be jazz, blues and rock. I've been playing for a number of years but never really took it seriously (as in I've never sat down and properly practiced, mostly because I don't really know what to practice!).



Meh I would say blues is less about the technique involved, and more along the phrasing. I think Hendrix said something along the lines "The blues is easy to play, but hard to feel". You could get started right now learn a couple of licks from your favorite blues artist. Experiment with the phrasing of the notes that you're playing.


Repeat the same lick over, and over again with different phrasings. This is what a lot of blues artist do. Stevie Ray Vaughan, and B.B King are prime example of this. They'll repeat the same lick over, and over again with different phrasings. If I had to choose which was one of the hardest styles to learn I'd choose the blues hands down. Sure if you have the technique you could easily play the licks, but if you don't have the ear it's not going to sound bluesy.


Also blues players have a very loose feel within their music I think Buddy Guy, and Jimi Hendrix are prime examples of this. Just listen to their sound they just sound nice relaxed, and loosened up. Jimmy Page is another good example too I think he has a really unique loose feel in his guitar playing. That's how you know they're playing from the heart.
Last edited by Black_devils at Nov 15, 2014,
#15
I don't thing this have been mentioned above but as a pro guitarist and guitar teacher the best advice i can give you:

You have to learn how to PRACTICE. sounds funny and obvious but it's not. practicing in the right way is an art! you will waste a lot of time and get yourself really frustrated and might not be able to achieve the level of playing you desire if you don't know how to practice. really! invest you're time into learning how to practice. buy good books on that topic. and than everything you want to become will be easier to achieve.
#16
Quote by JureGolobic
I don't thing this have been mentioned above but as a pro guitarist and guitar teacher the best advice i can give you:

You have to learn how to PRACTICE. sounds funny and obvious but it's not. practicing in the right way is an art! you will waste a lot of time and get yourself really frustrated and might not be able to achieve the level of playing you desire if you don't know how to practice. really! invest you're time into learning how to practice. buy good books on that topic. and than everything you want to become will be easier to achieve.



Agreed if you understand how to practice you'll know how to achieve your guitar related goals. As the old saying goes "Quality over Quantity". It's much better to have an organized practice schedule that's 2 hours long. Instead of working on the same things over, and over again for 7 hours straight. Learning how to practice is more of a trial, and error approach. Not everyone learns the same way just because something works for the next guy doesn't mean it's going to work for you.
#17
I am trying to teach myself too.

You can learn many ways. Bille Sheehan said that everybody he knows have learned by copying music from record.

One way is to divide things to small pieces. Left hand and right hand technique. Aural training and so on. You can check http://www.justinguitar.com/en/IM-000-IntermediateMethod.php, google Steve Vai 12 hour guitar training, Pepper Brown, Tom Hess. You get idea about trainigprogram. You can be very precise and use timer ja write down metronome beats you use. Record yours playing maybe one a week. Then you see your progress.

I am training more random. I have 3-4 book: funk rhytym, everybodys's jazz guitar rhytym, contemporary Travis picking and then songs. I do some thing from one book and then I change to another. I have been used library a lot. If I found something good book I usually order it from Amazon. More I've been doing that. I have learned to be more analytic. I see now what is good for me now, what is too easy and whats too difficult. I got tons books waiting for right moment. First method book I played was legendary Hal Leonard guitar method complete. I learnet reading notes, timing. There is little bit everything, but it is one good book to stars from. You get basics down or At least you can be sure that you got basic information to go on.

Then go to play with others. There you see what you can and what you have to train. Now I got 3 song to learn, I can't go there without knowing my stuff. It forces me to practice and to focus.

I boughted electric drums to isolaiting rhytymtraining and for fun. Its good way to learn sheet music rhytym and to leart to thing band arrangenemet. Then I sing song when I driving car and there is eartraining choir stuff in spotify, very good solfege stuff.

Now I started to learn to play harp, I am thinking about solfege when I try to find melody. It forces me to listening. And of course I want play harp also.

I should transcripe from the records, but for some reason I dont. Billy Sheehan and Eric Clapton did

When I got difficulties with something youtube helps. I watch lesson and good guitar heroes especially how they do it. For hand positions there are many variations.

Time is limited. When I started years ago to more focused to train I am while different level now.

I thinking we are very different and we have to find out own way to learn. You have to to what motivates you and after all it have to be mostly fun. It is fun to learn and when you notice that no you can do something that was imposible last week. I am into those method books+cd and training isolating different componets of music.

If you are into book+ cd amazon readercomments are big help to find good stuff.

After all music is to play songs and everything should serve to playing songs.

By the way, my first post here. Hope that we can help each others and share information, ups and downs, and have fun!

I have bee rambling with guitar playing for many years. Now for some years I have been going forward. I have been playing in some bands. I was already giving up bandplaying. Then I one night in Bar we did formed rocktrio. And finaly me and my band grooves. Everything just clicked.