#1
Hi all,
I'm in a band thats playing club dates every weekend and the occasional outdoor gig. Right now I'm playing through a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe that I love, but never really can crank it past 3 or 4 and I feel like I'm never able to coax its true tone out live. It's 40w so more than loud enough for this stage of gigging.

Im thinking about getting this Fender Princeton Reissue not only for the groovy looks but I loved its tone when I heard a friends. Do you guys think this amp will push enough for me to play small club gigs with a 5-piece (2 electric, bass, drums, keys)? Most of the time the amps are mic'ed up but sometimes not ya know...
(any other amp suggestions are greatly appreciated as well)

Also, for future large gigs, could I buy a cab and plug the Princeton into that? Not too sure how cabs work, I've only had combos.

Thanks in advance UG!
Last edited by ImSiler99 at Sep 23, 2014,
#2
To pay 1.2k to be able to do what you want just doesn't seem that worth it to me... If your volume was at .5 on the Hot Rod I would say you might want to downsize, but at 3-4 your tone shouldn't be suffering. You could turn down the overall volume of your pedals or pre-amp pieces and then turn the amp up. Turning down your guitar, though, can cut your tone.

Hooking up a combo amp to another speaker requires an output port on the amp, or using a mic (although you'll loose tone using a mic). Neither the Hot Rod or Princeton have an output port that I can see in the specifications listing. You would have to use a mic, and you might also have to worry about powering the speaker and deflecting the combo amp's sound. If you were going through a PA system, micing your amp wouldn't be too much of an issue. However, if one of the amps does have an output port, all of this is useless to say :p

If you absolutely want a new amp that you can turn up some more without overpower, and being able to send the amp's signal through a cab speaker or a PA, get an amp with an output port.
#3
You can get get a cab for the Princeton Reverb and you'll probably need one since it only has a single 10" speaker. You also won't have much headroom since it's only 12W. The HRD has 3 volume controls and is probably capable of doing what you want to do better than the PR. With the HRD, you have a bunch tonal options with the master, volume, and drive controls. The PR just has a single volume control and you're limited by how loud you're playing. If you need to play loudly, you lose cleans. If you can't play loudly, you won't have drive. It's tough to gig with NMV amps because you're tone is really in the sound guy's hands. PRs are great and they have their purpose but I don't think they'll solve your issue. I don't even think you have an issue. If you wanted to push your HRD a little more, I would just get an attenuator like the Dr. Z Brake Lite to get the volume down a few dB. But if you really want a PR, I would get one if it's bigger brothers with an attenuator. A '68 DR would be a good choice. You get a little more headroom, a bigger speaker, and you still get that lush reverb and vibrato.
#4
Quote by ImSiler99
Right now I'm playing through a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe that I love, but never really can crank it past 3 or 4 and I feel like I'm never able to coax its true tone out live. It's 40w so more than loud enough for this stage of gigging.
That's an impression many people have.

And it's plain wrong unless you want power tube distortion.
To get power tube distortion at lower volumes you'll need a hella smaller amp though, and that princeton reverb is still fairly big.
Quote by ImSiler99
Do you guys think this amp will push enough for me to play small club gigs with a 5-piece (2 electric, bass, drums, keys)? Most of the time the amps are mic'ed up but sometimes not ya know...
If you have spare money get a PA system.
The thing will probably be able to be heard just fine, but it's not like it will sound clear or anything, and it's not like it'll start feeding back itself as soon as you turn towards it.
Quote by ImSiler99
Also, for future large gigs, could I buy a cab and plug the Princeton into that? Not too sure how cabs work, I've only had combos.
Yes you can plug that in a bigger cab, but a bigger cab won't give you a sound that much louder.

Which is one of the reasons why you want a PA system if you're playing live in a place bigger than your home's living room.
Unless of course you have an enormous living room.
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#5
You'll probably have to mic it to hold up with the rest of the band. Another option is to get an extension cab so you can push more air. This won't exactly make it louder as it's sill putting out the same power, it's just more efficient at it and disperses the sound more. Also, to be heard with the rest of the band you'll have to crank it and won't have crystal clear cleans. This may or may not be a bad thing depending on the sound you want. Amps on the edge of breakup sound great. Anyway, you'll have to use your guitar's volume knob to get a cleaner sound.

If you keep your amp you can try using an attenuator like a thd hotplate. You can also replace the amp's speaker to a less efficient one (the hrd has a 98db speaker I believe... not sure what speakers are rated lower though). That will make the amp work harder to reach the same volume, meaning you can turn it up a bit more to reach what is now 3-4.

If you can try and borrow your friend's amp to see how it does in a band context. I've seen it work very well but only in quiet genres like country. Personally I'd look for something around 20-30w and with at least one 12in speaker (preferably 2) so I have enough headroom and some bass. Actually, I've got an Egnater Rebel 30 running into two 1x12. Try looking for one if you can. Should be able to find one for cheap. The cleans are pretty good (second only to Fenders imo) which I'm guessing is what you're after. Good luck!
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#6
im not sure you need that drastic of a change, but in general a hot rod is a fairly nuetered, generic, lifeless fender amp. good fender cleans, but not really like the cleans or dirties that otehr fender amps give. it really has no famous fendery qualities about it. nobody makes a "hot rod deluxe" sounding pedal.

its a quality amps a solid working mans amp. but it seems to me like your wanting something with a bit more character.

honestly, you probably would like a blues junior a lot better. or something between a blues junior and the princeton.
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