#1
Hi all, newbie here. I need some help. I have a basement studio put together for my project and I'm trying to develop my rhythm tone. (Sample Below) How can I give the tone more edge and presence without it getting fizzy and crackly? I have no outboard gear, just an 003 rack and pro tools 10. Is there some plugs in there that would help me make this tone more mean or edgy without the hiss. Thanks in advance.


https://soundcloud.com/user230661498/tone-test-9-21-14
#2
Possibly more gain, definitely more highs, possibly more presence.
If it gets fizzy use a second or third order HCF and remove the fizzy high frequency part.

Also did you double track the thing or you only applied a spreader or sample delay to the guitar track?

'cause real double tracking makes wonders.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
Quote by Spambot_2
Possibly more gain, definitely more highs, possibly more presence.
If it gets fizzy use a second or third order HCF and remove the fizzy high frequency part.

Also did you double track the thing or you only applied a spreader or sample delay to the guitar track?

'cause real double tracking makes wonders.


Double tracked. When i bring the low pass up it gets noisy fairly quickly. Sorry, but what is a third order High Cut? Just the same filter multiple times?
#4
Quote by 1GoVols1
Double tracked. When i bring the low pass up it gets noisy fairly quickly.
Then don't bring it that high, or use a different cab simulation.
Quote by 1GoVols1
Sorry, but what is a third order High Cut? Just the same filter multiple times?
You also can make a third order one with three first order ones, yeah, but with digital EQ's it's easier.

First order means a 6dB per octave cut, second order is 12dB per octave, third order 18dB per octave and so on.

Basically, the higher the order the steepest the filter.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
Quote by Spambot_2
Then don't bring it that high, or use a different cab simulation.
You also can make a third order one with three first order ones, yeah, but with digital EQ's it's easier.

First order means a 6dB per octave cut, second order is 12dB per octave, third order 18dB per octave and so on.

Basically, the higher the order the steepest the filter.


OK, so I would first install a mild angle filter @ -18db, test the sound and if needed add a second with a steeper angle @ -12db and so on?
#7
You need more highs. I'd drop in a HFC at 14k or so. Remember, the bass brings the rumble; guitar brings the punch.
#8
Quote by 1GoVols1
OK, so I would first install a mild angle filter @ -18db, test the sound and if needed add a second with a steeper angle @ -12db and so on?
No.

A 6dB per octave filter is a filter applied at a certain frequency that lowers the volume of the signal by 6dB at each octave increment.

It's a high cut filter applied at 10kHz it will lower the level of your signal by about 3dB at 10kHz, then it will lower the level by 9dB at 20kHz, by 15dB at 40kHz and so on.

The higher the order, the higher the dB per octave cut, the steeper the graph showing what you're cutting.

You though don't need to apply more than one first order filter if you want a different, steeper filter - you can simply choose "18dB per octave", or 12dB or 24dB, in the filter settings.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
You need more highs. I'd drop in a HFC at 14k or so. Remember, the bass brings the rumble; guitar brings the punch.


Here is the scratch track for the first tune. Drums are basically good, as is bass and vocals. The guitars are all pieced together building the tune, but I can't get any further along because of a lack of finding a good guitar tone. It isn't mixed or anything, but you will see why I'm stressed about finding something that works. These tones are a mic'd cab with different mics but they all suck. At any rate, any tips would help... and what do you guys think about the concept of the tune?

https://soundcloud.com/user230661498/slt-9-20-14
#10
Quote by 1GoVols1
Here is the scratch track for the first tune. Drums are basically good, as is bass and vocals. The guitars are all pieced together building the tune, but I can't get any further along because of a lack of finding a good guitar tone. It isn't mixed or anything, but you will see why I'm stressed about finding something that works. These tones are a mic'd cab with different mics but they all suck. At any rate, any tips would help... and what do you guys think about the concept of the tune?

https://soundcloud.com/user230661498/slt-9-20-14

The concept is fine. But honestly your issue is that it isn't mixed.

Also, I'm fairly certain you're not mic'ing the amps correctly. Read this article, if you want to keep mic'ing amps:
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/aug07/articles/guitaramprecording.htm
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 27, 2014,