#1
Calling all, not just leftys...
Im looking for a left handed electric around the £250 mark but cannot find anything i like out there... its hard after falling for a PRS SE that is way out of my league.
Any suggestions of makes or models that are good for a lefty like me would be sweet...
Thanks dudes
#2
Learn To Play Righty!


Okay, okay -- check in with Rondo Music dot com and see what they have. http://www.rondomusic.com/electricguitarleft.html

This is why guitarists like Neal Schon (also a lefty) learned to play righty; there just aren't a lot of instruments out there that have a left-handed model.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 23, 2014,
#3
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
Thanks guys, and I have attempted right but it just feels so wrong.. My playing would take dramatically longer to improve and for me itz not worth it. Cheers for the help!
#5
I'll see you my Epiphine dot.

Peter Cooks, GAK, Andertons & Guitar Guitar generally have the best lefty selections in the uk. Also, the 2nd hand market is pretty bad for sellers so check ebay.

What music do you want to play?
#6
Check sites like eBay or Reverb.com for lefty axes. Here's a sample search I did:
https://reverb.com/marketplace/electric-guitars?query=Left&product_type=electric-guitars&price_max=450&sort=price%7Cdesc

Their filter isn't as good as it should be. Some righty guitars are still in there, but that could be listing errors due to sellers. And not all sellers ship to where you are.

...but some do.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
Quote by jack24593
Thanks guys, and I have attempted right but it just feels so wrong.. My playing would take dramatically longer to improve and for me itz not worth it. Cheers for the help!


This is always interesting to me. I'm a righty, but for the fun of it tried playing lefty on a borrowed guitar for a while. Took me about three months of concentrated practice before it felt normal. But I think that's largely because I've played righty so long. I think if I didn't have so many years going the opposite direction, I'd have done it even more quickly. So I'm a proponent of it being more than possible the opposite direction.

Remember that no other instrument gives you a choice; everything from piano to oboe to violin is played just one way. And folks of either handedness are able develop the same level of proficiency with them.

The frustration you're facing now in trying to find lefty guitars will continue for the rest of your life; there just isn't the market or the interest available for most manufacturers to build any quantity of left-handed guitars.
#8
I'm right handed but I always thought guitars were backwards in that you strum with your more dominant hand and play chords with your least dominant hand.

In my mind strumming is easier than making chord shapes or doing scales...etc. So why does my weak hand do that complicated stuff??

Then I just shut up and learned.
Last edited by ken styles at Sep 24, 2014,
#9
Quote by ken styles
I'm right handed but I always thought guitars were backwards in that you strum with your less dominant hand and play chords with your least dominant hand.

In my mind strumming is easier than making chord shapes or doing scales...etc. So why does my weak hand do that complicated stuff??

Then I just shut up and learned.


I'm sort of the same way. I've been playing keyboards all my life. On piano, the left hand was bass and rhythm, the right hand was melody. On classical pipe organ, I was playing bass with both feet, heel and toe, on the pedals. On something like the sax, fingering was equally complicated with either hand and you had the additional task of developing the reed embouchure.

To hear someone whining that "it feels funny" to play one handed or the other on a guitar is, to me, a bit goofy. Like you, I just shut up and learned.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 24, 2014,
#10
I am keen on the dot, it looks lovely but i haven't been able to find one for what i would consider a reasonable price. Plus i hear they don't make them for leftys anymore..
I play all kinds of styles, from blues to rock and inbetween. Not much metal.. Thanks dude
#11
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Sep 24, 2014,
#12
Quote by ken styles
I'm right handed but I always thought guitars were backwards in that you strum with your less dominant hand and play chords with your least dominant hand.

In my mind strumming is easier than making chord shapes or doing scales...etc. So why does my weak hand do that complicated stuff??

Then I just shut up and learned.


This is actually EXACTLY my approach - my only benefit being that I'm actually a lefty so I learned to play the guitar right-handed. My left hand just has a lot more precise movements (it's my writing/coordination hand after all) so fretting with that hand to me makes a lot more sense than strumming/picking with it.
#13
Quote by dspellman
This is always interesting to me. I'm a righty, but for the fun of it tried playing lefty on a borrowed guitar for a while. Took me about three months of concentrated practice before it felt normal. But I think that's largely because I've played righty so long. I think if I didn't have so many years going the opposite direction, I'd have done it even more quickly. So I'm a proponent of it being more than possible the opposite direction.

Remember that no other instrument gives you a choice; everything from piano to oboe to violin is played just one way. And folks of either handedness are able develop the same level of proficiency with them.

The frustration you're facing now in trying to find lefty guitars will continue for the rest of your life; there just isn't the market or the interest available for most manufacturers to build any quantity of left-handed guitars.


This post is almost offensive to me as a left handed player. People play all instruments in different ways because it's more comfortable to them. Hell, I doubt you play guitar in a classical style/position. I'd never consider playing right handed because manufacturers don't see the point inaking lefties. There's tonnes of great guitars out there.

Regarding the dot- you can buy mine for a fair price if you want. I'm based in London, but can pack for a courier if you wanted.
#14
Pay someone to cut off both your hands and then sew the left hand onto your right stump and your right hand onto your leftstump. Buy a right handed guitar. Problem solved!
#15
Quote by matthewa
This post is almost offensive to me as a left handed player. People play all instruments in different ways because it's more comfortable to them. Hell, I doubt you play guitar in a classical style/position. I'd never consider playing right handed because manufacturers don't see the point inaking lefties. There's tonnes of great guitars out there.

Regarding the dot- you can buy mine for a fair price if you want. I'm based in London, but can pack for a courier if you wanted.



I totally agree with you on this.. i'm not going to spend months making righty feel normal just to appease some right handed know it alls. It feels great to play left handed, and the fact it's the only instrument in left hand versions makes it obvious the demand for leftys is there...
In regards to your dot, would you be able to send pics? i'm in newcastle at the moment but travel south occasionally. What would you consider a fair price? Thanks for offering it mate, appreciate it.. Also reasons for selling and opinion on the dot?
cheers
#16
Quote by matthewa
This post is almost offensive to me as a left handed player. People play all instruments in different ways because it's more comfortable to them. Hell, I doubt you play guitar in a classical style/position.


Actually, I do. I was taught classical/flamenco guitar by Candelas Delgado before I ever picked up an electric. What does that have to do with handedness?

That post was no more offensive than any teacher explaining to a student the difference between techniques. I don't care how you play the guitar, but I will note that it's not *necessary* to play guitar left-handed just because you write that way. And if you're having a "lefty dilemma" (after the title of this thread and the original poster's post) finding guitars and price range, and especially if you're still a relative beginner, then it's worth *considering* swapping hands. You may THINK it's going to take you longer to get good, but that's highly unlikely to be the case. There are just too many really good guitar players who write lefthanded who play righthanded. I've taught some of them. There is NO reason to learn the guitar lefthanded if you have two fully functional hands. Given the paucity (if there were "tonnes", there'd be no reason for the OP's post OR this thread) of left-handed guitars, there's ample reason NOT to learn the guitar lefthanded.

My point was that nearly all other instruments require that you play them as designed, and that it's not a restriction or offensive in any way. Look at any orchestra and tell me again that "people play all instruments in different ways because it's more comfortable to them." That's bunk. Bow in the right hand, violin in the left. Computer keyboards are run with both hands and aren't (usually) available in righty and lefty versions (no YTREWQ versions?). Cars ARE available with the steering wheel on different sides (only some of them, thanks largely to the Brits), but even lefties learn to drive a stick shift with the right hand on the stick and the left foot on the clutch in the US, and if I drive in the UK, I have to learn the opposite (and I don't get offended). No one makes the controls of a fork lift available in righty and lefty. Pilots learn to fly airplanes from both chairs (with the controls in the center), etc.

And please note that while the comment was originally meant light-heartedly, I did provide one good source of guitars in left-hand within the OP's price range. A Google search would have revealed more, had the OP done one.

In any case, good luck selling your dot. Didn't mean to cockblock your sale hijack.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 24, 2014,
#17
Carvin makes quality Left Handed Guitars too! Just another option for you to think about.

Good luck in your search!

Peace! X-Mann \m/
#18
Quote by jack24593
I totally agree with you on this.. i'm not going to spend months making righty feel normal just to appease some right handed know it alls.

The issues you are having are of your own creation.
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#19
The issues you are having are of your own creation.[/QUO

the only issues for me are right handed people telling me i ought to play their way. I have no issues playing left handed
#20
Quote by dspellman
Actually, I do. I was taught classical/flamenco guitar by Candelas Delgado before I ever picked up an electric. What does that have to do with handedness?

That post was no more offensive than any teacher explaining to a student the difference between techniques. I don't care how you play the guitar, but I will note that it's not *necessary* to play guitar left-handed just because you write that way. And if you're having a "lefty dilemma" (after the title of this thread and the original poster's post) finding guitars and price range, and especially if you're still a relative beginner, then it's worth *considering* swapping hands. You may THINK it's going to take you longer to get good, but that's highly unlikely to be the case. There are just too many really good guitar players who write lefthanded who play righthanded. I've taught some of them. There is NO reason to learn the guitar lefthanded if you have two fully functional hands. Given the paucity (if there were "tonnes", there'd be no reason for the OP's post OR this thread) of left-handed guitars, there's ample reason NOT to learn the guitar lefthanded.

My point was that nearly all other instruments require that you play them as designed, and that it's not a restriction or offensive in any way. Look at any orchestra and tell me again that "people play all instruments in different ways because it's more comfortable to them." That's bunk. Bow in the right hand, violin in the left. Computer keyboards are run with both hands and aren't (usually) available in righty and lefty versions (no YTREWQ versions?). Cars ARE available with the steering wheel on different sides (only some of them, thanks largely to the Brits), but even lefties learn to drive a stick shift with the right hand on the stick and the left foot on the clutch in the US, and if I drive in the UK, I have to learn the opposite (and I don't get offended). No one makes the controls of a fork lift available in righty and lefty. Pilots learn to fly airplanes from both chairs (with the controls in the center), etc.

And please note that while the comment was originally meant light-heartedly, I did provide one good source of guitars in left-hand within the OP's price range. A Google search would have revealed more, had the OP done one.

In any case, good luck selling your dot. Didn't mean to cockblock your sale hijack.


Honestly. Try using a kettle with your left hand. We get shit on a lot, and commercial decisions which force me to do something that feels unnatural is ultimately frustrating when in a right-centric world.

#21
Quote by Eryth
This is actually EXACTLY my approach - my only benefit being that I'm actually a lefty so I learned to play the guitar right-handed. My left hand just has a lot more precise movements (it's my writing/coordination hand after all) so fretting with that hand to me makes a lot more sense than strumming/picking with it.



^^THIS^^

As a lefty myself, a left handed guitar never an option for me when I was 14 and wanted my 1st guitar (waaaaaaaaaaay back in 1987ish). I got a regular one and learned to play it. Just feels natural to me.

To this day, the guitar and a golf club are the only things I do right handed. That is the way I learned.
#22
Quote by matthewa
Honestly. Try using a kettle with your left hand.


?? I do that. Probably a poor example. Or maybe I have an easier time working with either hand. I'm ambidextrous with all my pots and pans.

We get shit on a lot, and commercial decisions which force me to do something that feels unnatural is ultimately frustrating when in a right-centric world.


I get all that.

In school my left-handed friends griped about the school chairs with the writing areas that connected to the RIGHT hand of the chair (as you sat on it). If you're a boxer, you usually get trained with your dominant hand, but the advanced martial arts trainers will force training that will balance you pretty much side-to-side no matter which is your dominant hand. I also understand that there are some left-handed children that claim they were abused because their parents forced them to learn everything right-handed. And some that are grateful for it.

With an instrument, however, it's often not a matter of choice. When learning pipe organ after having some piano training, I first learned to play bass notes with the left foot, heel and toe (try this while playing guitar with either hand some time) and then had to learn the right foot as well. Talk about "feeling unnatural."

Lefties aren't handicapped in the right handed direction, nor are righties handicapped in the left-handed direction. Like anything else, it's a matter of practice and development of the neural pathways (and in some cases, the muscle strength). All of this happens in the learning of the instrument. That's why Jeff Healey was able to learn how to play the guitar flat on his lap, fretting strings like someone playing a piano and picking with the other, and that's why people are able to play instruments like the Chapman stick, in which both hands do exactly the same things.

I understand the alienation that some lefties feel, but I don't buy into it.
#23
I'm not so sure about the idea that a left-handed person will be able to play right-handed if only he practices well enough. Even besides the fact that I'm a lefty and play guitar right-handed, I honestly couldn't imagine that if I started playing as an actual lefty I'd get to the point where I'm at right now as a right-handed guitar player within the same amount of time (playing a little over 6 years now, certainly not a beginner anymore). This is not even bearing in mind the fact that I've already been playing right-handed to begin with. Had I started out as a lefty, it would still have taken me a lot longer, I'm sure.

Which brings us to a dilemma. The dexterity of one's hands independent of each other may vary greatly both between your separate hands as well as between people in the first place. I write left-handed (and couldn't even write out my own name with my right) but I play right-handed, use scissors with my right hand, hold my knife in my right hand, am right-eye dominant, etc. etc. I know people who can write cursive with both left and right hands without ever having consciously practiced this, and I know right-handed people who wouldn't be able to properly hold a coffee cup in their left hand if their lives depended on it. I don't want to say "it's all genetics man" since there's no way to prove this (and I won't say that it's impossible to learn to play guitar with the 'wrong' hand) but you can't say "stop whining" either. It's just a simple fact that some people are left-handed. The fact that this group is a minority in the world doesn't mean they should be taken less seriously.

Besides, if it IS a case of conditioning then you have to start this conditioning at a VERY early age. I personally started playing guitar at 16 (I held one a few times before that of course but when I was 16 I got my first own guitar and actually started learning how to play). The moment you have a certain way of doing things there's no real use in going against this flow, even though it might be 'more practical' to do so. Playing right-handed feels natural to me, so I do just that.

One might say that everyone should just write right-handed no matter what your dominant hand actually is 'just because everyone else is doing it' - which to me feels pretty absurd (just think of the analogies you can draw from and with this situation!). The practical side shouldn't be ignored, and a lot of you make good points, but that doesn't mean that learning to play with the hand opposite of your dominant hand will always be as GOOD as just playing with the dominant hand in the first place.
Last edited by Eryth at Sep 28, 2014,
#24
Quote by jack24593


the only issues for me are right handed people telling me i ought to play their way. I have no issues playing left handed


Of course you don't have any issues playing left handed. You're left handed, and that's how you've learned. The issue you're having is the lack of availability of left handed guitars. And that's not going to change, because, like it or not, lefties are a small minority, made even smaller by the fact that many lefties do actually learn to play guitar right handed, making them righties, as far as the market is concerned.

And there's not anything wrong with going "backwards", either. Tons of people do it. Especially if you get started early, going one way, it becomes just as natural. Some of the best guitar players I know are actually left handed, but never even attempted to learn lefty, because they knew they'd spend their whole life having a hard time finding guitars. They started right handed day one, and it wasn't any more difficult or awkward than a guitar always is for a day one beginner, regardless of dexterity.

And Dspellman's point, comparing it to other instruments, is spot on. The vast majority of instruments are played exactly the same, by both righties and lefties. You don't have to play guitar lefty just because you write lefty, or do anything else lefty. If a left handed person started out playing guitar right handed, they can develop chops and whatnot just fine. It's not like there would be a skill threshold they would hit, which they wouldn't be able to break without playing the other way, or anything like that. I've talked to people who thought that would be an issue eventually.

Anyway, back on the subject of lefty guitar availability, Schecter makes tons of lefties. Almost (not quite, but almost) all of their guitars are available in lefty. Problem is, not many stores bother stocking them, for the same reason that so many companies don't bother making them. Still though, any dealer should be able to special order something for you.
#25
Quote by Eryth
I'm not so sure about the idea that a left-handed person will be able to play right-handed if only he practices well enough.


I get that you're not sure about that idea.

But in the entire rest of your explanation, you notice that you didn't deal with the fact that for nearly all other instruments, both lefty and righty learn to play them exactly the same way; there's simply no other choice. The same percentage of righties and lefties show up in the orchestras of the world that exist in the rest of life. In short, there seems to be no advantage OR disadvantage in reality.
#26
Actually, lefties are statistically overrepresented in music.

From Wikipedia,
In his book Right-Hand, Left-Hand, Chris McManus of University College London argues that the proportion of left-handers is increasing and left-handed people as a group have historically produced an above-average quota of high achievers. He says that left-handers' brains are structured differently (in a way that increases their range of abilities) and the genes that determine left-handedness also govern development of the language centers of the brain.

Writing in Scientific American, McManus states that,

"Studies in the U.K., U.S. and Australia have revealed that left-handed people differ from right-handers by only one IQ point, which is not noteworthy ... Left-handers’ brains are structured differently from right-handers’ in ways that can allow them to process language, spatial relations and emotions in more diverse and potentially creative ways. Also, a slightly larger number of left-handers than right-handers are especially gifted in music and math. A study of musicians in professional orchestras found a significantly greater proportion of talented left-handers, even among those who played instruments that seem designed for right-handers, such as violins. Similarly, studies of adolescents who took tests to assess mathematical giftedness found many more left-handers in the population."
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#27
It's the same with most creative arts- left-handers have a much bigger representation than vs normal population. This creative drive could arguably be what led left-handers to challenge the norm and modify/flip their instruments in the first place.

As an aside, there's quite a people playing left-handed string instruments in orchestras these days.

for me, I learnt the violin & percussion the standard way. I learnt piano. Even as a child, with toy guitars though, I turned them lefty according to my parents. Growing up seeing pictures of McCartney & Hendrix, and later Cobain, it was a perfectly normal idea to re-string my first acoustic left-handed, and continue in that vein ever since.

I've never found a huge problem with the limited range of left-handed guitars. I prefer classic styles and I'm not afraid of modifying things. I obviously understand the argument that if you want the full range of guitars, play right-handed, but surely the fact we have a choice should be celebrated and supported?
#28
Quote by matthewa
I obviously understand the argument that if you want the full range of guitars, play right-handed, but surely the fact we have a choice should be celebrated and supported?


I agree completely.

Except that what *usually* happens is the complaint regarding lack of selection. "Manufacturers oughta..." And that leads to threads titled "Lefty dilemmas..."
#30
I have some lefty friends, one is a bit of a renaissance man. He is left hand dominant but plays all (cello, bagpipes, violin, guitar, etc, plenty more) instruments righty. So what if you are confused for three months, music is a lifetime of fun and you will save yourself a hell of alot of trouble if you just take a couple months and learn it right handed.

I'm not being "righty" elitist, its just simple logic for YOUR own convenience.
Last edited by JGM258 at Sep 29, 2014,
#31
Quote by JGM258
I'm not being "righty" elitist, its just simple logic for YOUR own convenience.

+1
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#32
Quote by dspellman
I get that you're not sure about that idea.

But in the entire rest of your explanation, you notice that you didn't deal with the fact that for nearly all other instruments, both lefty and righty learn to play them exactly the same way; there's simply no other choice. The same percentage of righties and lefties show up in the orchestras of the world that exist in the rest of life. In short, there seems to be no advantage OR disadvantage in reality.



(Tl,dr of the following: the notion that 'convention' should be the leading motivation for playing left or right handed is absurd).

In which case YOU seem to completely skim over the fact that playing guitar is a very different thing than playing drums, piano or tuba as well as the fact (since we're playing around with BB anyway) most of these instruments can (and in reality have been) mirrored much like the guitar. Haven't you ever seen a drummer switch his snare with his high-hat (basically mirroring his kit) because he's a lefty? I sure have - on multiple occasions.

The point I was trying to make is that the notion that 'just because it's the norm you should simply adapt' is absurd - and that point still stands. Because where would you draw the line? Should everybody simply start writing right-handed, start playing football or whatever other sport you might play right-handed?

Let me expand on that analogy. There are sports where what side of your body is dominant doesn't matter, much like you suggest is the case when playing an instrument. And I will not question the fact that some sports may be practiced to such an extent that you can actually have a 'full-dominant' body, so to speak. A case that comes to mind are a lot of soccer players: many of them will practice shooting with their less dominant foot - often with great success. Case in point: Messi has a mean shot in his right foot, even though he's a natural lefty.

HOWEVER - I can tell you a little anecdote about that. I practiced archery for a couple of years when I was younger. Shooting right or left-handed is about as far from 'convention' as you can get in archery (side note: this is why I mentioned being right-eye dominant in the post you quoted in the first place). This is because, by birth, you are either left or right eye dominant. If you shoot with the wrong eye aiming your arrow, you won't hit anything. Sure, it's possible to adapt to shooting with the wrong eye, adjust your sights etc. but none of this will get you any closer to shooting as well as you would when you're aiming with your dominant eye.

To get to the point - just because in 'sports' it is possible to excel as a lefty when you're a righty and vice versa, doesn't mean that in ANY sport you can basically 'choose' to be left or right, or that in any sport you can simply 'be' a righty when you're a lefty. The same goes with music versus separate instruments. The argument of "it's just convenient" is a fallacy. Even though the words are very much alike, people seem to link the idea of 'convenience' to the idea of 'convention' far too easily.
Last edited by Eryth at Sep 29, 2014,