Why do so few people take their irst two years of college in community college?

#1
Hey UG, remember me? Well, I'm a little, smarter than I was in my last college thread. Farther along enough to have just looked back on my last college thread and cringe from how whiny I sounded and be able to laugh along with what half of yall said because, it held some truth to it. I'll admit though, I'm still pretty naiive becuase I still can' let go of wanting to teach Japanese or do something with the lanuage. Hmm, maybe I should look into animating. Well, in any case, I have a job and it pays enough that I can pay for college all out of pocket, and once I can file my taxes aloe this year, I can fill in my own FASFA and maybe get help, maybe -_- Like I said, I'm pretty naive and have a lot of research to do.

Also, my biggest improvement is that I'm not going to some big university, yet. Right now I'm going to community college to get general education out the way. (Soo, the first two years of a BA) Soo my question to you is Why don't more people get their irst 2 years out the way at a community college?

It's way cheaper for taking the same classes. You may be able to argue that the same class at a 4 year university might teach you more, but then you really have to wonder if that little more you learn is worth all of the extra money you pay. Not to mention being possibly crammed in a lecture hall with hundreds of other kids. Smaller classes really help, especially wen you can't hear in one ear.

Soo you save a lot of money and the classes are smaller and less intimidating, as long as you plan your classes right, all of your credits will transfer to whatever university you go to.

Soo, why don't more people start in community college?

Maybe I'm missing something, that seems to hapen a lot and I'm willing to listen and consider what everyone says. A lot of the time I end u learning and taking your and other peoples' suggestions.
Last edited by NyakoBwazo at Sep 25, 2014,
#4
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
because it costs 6-10k a semester at public universities

edit: i cannot read, my apologies - I went to community college


In the community college I go to, near Orlando, i's around 1500 for tuitoion a semester, so 3000 a year (AAssumin you do not tae summer classes books are another two to six hundred dollars a year. Classes are all one semester though.

EDIT: Your edit was just cold man. Yes, community colleges tend to simplify stuff, A LOT . However, it's really not as bad as you think and pretty much everyone I've met here were far more intelligent and mature than some of the people in high school were.
Last edited by NyakoBwazo at Sep 25, 2014,
#5
Because teachers and parents still put more value on a university education rather than a community college education or a trade. That is why many people who aren't really geared towards university end up there first.
#6
That approach doesn't always work.

For example, my chemical engineering classes all compound on one another (i.e., one class is a per-requisite for the next) for the most part. It takes 8 semesters to complete all of the necessary classes. So, if I were to take two years at a CC for gen eds, I would still end up needing 6 years to complete my degree. Not exactly a money-saving option.
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#7
Quote by badfish_lewis
Because teachers and parents still put more value on a university education rather than a community college education or a trade. That is why many people who aren't really geared towards university end up there first.

^^this.
people are starting to realize it though. more and more people are going the community route.
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#8
I tend to agree. So long as your credits transfer, I don't see why you'd start your freshman year at a University.


Quote by NyakoBwazo
I still can' let go of wanting to teach Japanese or do something with the lanuage. Hmm, maybe I should look into animating.



Oh you're one of those people.
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Last edited by StewieSwan at Sep 25, 2014,
#9
Quote by StewieSwan
I tend to agree. So long as your credits transfer, I don't see why you'd start your freshman year at a University.



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#10
I like how you had a typo on 'irst' in both your thread title and in your post.
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#11
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#13
I did that for my first semester. I got to the four year school and was completely unprepared. It was a different world. And doing all basics then all major classes sucks. gotta space out a few basics
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#14
Let's just put it this way.

If you have no real genuine and economical reason to start out in a university from the get go, then DO NOT do it. Just start at a community college.

However, if you are truly serious, and I mean serious about education (and your world revolves around it) and wanting to interact with experts in the fields you are studying and have those types of connections and opportunities, then start out in a uni.

If you start out in uni and slug through it without putting forth much effort, you are in my opinion wasting a lot of money and energy in having to do more work they force upon you in unis than community colleges.
Last edited by Unreal T at Sep 25, 2014,
#15
I went to Wisconsin state universities for general studies.

I actually got an Associate's Degree (2 year degree) in general studies, and then 95% of that stuff transferred over as generals. (I now have a 4 year degree as well.) I saved boatloads of money; because, as a Wisconsin resident, I got a better rate at my 2-year school (which was cheaper than my 4-year school). I then saved, of course, at my 4-year school. Win-win!
#16
Quote by Unreal T
Let's just put it this way.

If you have no real genuine and economical reason to start out in a university from the get go, then DO NOT do it. Just start at a community college.

However, if you are truly serious, and I mean serious about education (and your world revolves around it) and wanting to interact with experts in the fields you are studying and have those types of connections and opportunities, then start out in a uni.

This sounds about right. The greatest thing I got from going to a four year school was being part of a department. I declared my major earlier than most since I was a transfer so I've met a ton of people in the field. My professors know me and I have a wide range of friends and acquaintances who are all in the same field. We all get into Facebook chats for class or bounce ideas off each other for papers.

It's a world of difference if you're in a specific field. I never got that stuff at community college.
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Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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#17
Because I wanted to leave home asap and because college (what you call community college) is a bigger joke than university. I doubt credits would transfer fully. Maybe 2 years in college would be enough to knock off half the requirements in the first 2 years of uni.

~edit~

Seriously, I can't even find a legitimate math course listed by my local college.
Last edited by Godsmack_IV at Sep 25, 2014,
#18
It can be more expensive in the end if you aren't careful with transferable credits. Some places have special requirements or rules. Like I never took a foreign language. Both my previous college and my current one offer native language. The one I took at the community college is a different language than what is offered at my current school but it still transferred since they both have a native language program.

^Not even college algebra?
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#20
Quote by Godsmack_IV
All the math descriptions sound exactly like what I took in the pre-university track back in highschool.

Is your local CC a "tech school"? Because those generally offer high school style math, for some reason. I had to go to a state community college to get legitimate math courses (that's pretty much why I drove an hour every day for 2 years...classes that were applicable to me, lol), such as College Algebra, Trig, Calculus, etc.
#21
Officially listed as a member of the association of community colleges. That list provides them the title of a 'College of Applied Arts and Technology'. Something they don't really advertise on their site.

~edit~

First year uni math here starts with linear algebra, discrete algebra, and calculus. You walk into calc and the assumption is that you already learnt your trig back in highscool.
Last edited by Godsmack_IV at Sep 25, 2014,
#22
Quote by Godsmack_IV
Because I wanted to leave home asap and because college (what you call community college) is a bigger joke than university. I doubt credits would transfer fully. Maybe 2 years in college would be enough to knock off half the requirements in the first 2 years of uni.

~edit~

Seriously, I can't even find a legitimate math course listed by my local college.

I know a girl that did something like this and it worked out but honestly how do you not get academic scholarships lol
#23
Quote by Godsmack_IV
Officially listed as a member of the association of community colleges. That list provides them the title of a 'College of Applied Arts and Technology'. Something they don't really advertise on their site.

That's why. That title is code for: "Come here to get a tech cert".

~edit~

First year uni math here starts with linear algebra, discrete algebra, and calculus. You walk into calc and the assumption is that you already learnt your trig back in highscool.

We start with college algebra generally (which can also cover Trig, depending on your school), then calculus, and then linear algebra. Discrete algebra isn't really a thing at most US universities.
#24
Quote by Godsmack_IV
Officially listed as a member of the association of community colleges. That list provides them the title of a 'College of Applied Arts and Technology'. Something they don't really advertise on their site.

~edit~

First year uni math here starts with linear algebra, discrete algebra, and calculus. You walk into calc and the assumption is that you already learnt your trig back in highscool.

So glad I only had to take college algebra.
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Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#25
>then linear algebra

buddy you need linear algebra for multivariate calculus in year 2

>no discrete algebra

buddy get your labeled graph and induction game on


you can do algebra on regular expressions. you can take the product between an automaton and a labeled graph. a whole world awaits you.
#27
Give me some rope, tie me to dream. Give me the hope to run out of steam. Somebody said "it could be here. We could be roped up, tied up, dead in a year."

I can't count the reasons I should stay. One by one they all just fade away
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#28
Quote by Godsmack_IV
>then linear algebra

buddy you need linear algebra for multivariate calculus in year 2

Yes, Linear Algebra is required for Calc 3, which covers multivariate Calculus.

>no discrete algebra

buddy get your labeled graph and induction game on

We cover that in College Algebra, lol.


you can do algebra on regular expressions. you can take the product between an automaton and a labeled graph. a whole world awaits you.

Yes, I know. I was a math minor; we did a lot of that.
#29
Ironically, reading the last thread over a year after making it has me actually reconsidering the Japanese thin, just because I'm not sure it's what i want to do, decisions decisions.

That prerequisite for chemical engineering sucks =/

Though, if that is not the situation (Which it isn't for most people, ) I hope more people switch to starting in community college, skip and SCREW the SAT!
#30
We take the ACT here so I guess that wasn't an issue for me. You need it to get into community college anyway.

I take the minimum amount of math class for my basics. Then I stayed away.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#31
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Yes, Linear Algebra is required for Calc 3, which covers multivariate Calculus.


We cover that in College Algebra, lol.


Yes, I know. I was a math minor; we did a lot of that.


ok just checking
#32
Because everyone is an idiot. Or if they aren't an idiot, they just like to waste their parents money or thoroughly enjoy being in debt.
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#33
Depends on the CC. If the credits transfer to the University you're looking to go to it works out. Plus, tuition can come off as much cheaper for classes that would otherwise be a lot more expensive at university prices.

AAAAAAAAAAAALLLLLSSOOOOOOOO

If you sucked at your SATS, it's a great way to push yourself back into the game and get yourself into something worthwhile.
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#34
Quote by RabidPikachu
Because everyone is an idiot. Or if they aren't an idiot, they just like to waste their parents money or thoroughly enjoy being in debt.

You left out an apostrophe.

I really only had a tech school instead of a real CC. The tuition was the same as the four institution. I just took a bunch of concurrent classes because there were grants for it.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
Last edited by BladeSlinger at Sep 25, 2014,
#36
Quote by Thrashtastic15
I know a girl that did something like this and it worked out but honestly how do you not get academic scholarships lol


I don't know what you're trying to say here but getting an academic scholarship will help but it won't really do much. Even if you are one of the few who win $10,000 scholarships (or multiple smaller ones, etc.) and such that's only a dent in how much it costs in the US.

I'm going to community college right now so whatever.

I know all of my credits will transfer so no big deal.
#37
Quote by slipknot5678
I don't know what you're trying to say here but getting an academic scholarship will help but it won't really do much. Even if you are one of the few who win $10,000 scholarships (or multiple smaller ones, etc.) and such that's only a dent in how much it costs in the US.

I'm going to community college right now so whatever.

I know all of my credits will transfer so no big deal.

i got so much

but then i didnt go

now im 22

i dont even want to look into it because i dont want to think about how much i probably threw away

welp
#38
The short answer: There is more to college than classwork. It is also very much about community and building relationships.

A tale of two generations:
My wife and I both went to CC, she got a tech degree in X-Ray and I went on to a state university for my BA. Both got good jobs.

One of my kids went to CC, got a AA degree in photography while volunteering at a national charity foundation. As soon as she graduated the charity hired her with good pay and benefits because she established strong relationships.

The other two kids were bright and gifted athletes. They were recruited to a top university but no full ride deals. Partial scholarships yes, it was still plenty out of pocket but they had an outstanding experience and both got very good jobs, houses, cars etc. upon graduation. The main difference is that they formed long term relationships with teammates and roommates that will last a lifetime. Some are Drs, Lawyers, scientists, pro musicians, engineers, university profs etc. and their experience and relationships far outweigh the classwork.

That is the main difference in my eyes. Having done both, I'd say the CC classes were every bit as rigorous as the State Univ and with smaller class sizes you might get a better education there the first 2 years. Classes are clearly numbered so you know going in if they will transfer to a 4 yr school. You do miss out on the long term relationship part though which has a lot of value. Above all, avoid student loans like the plague. Debt burden as a new grad can be absolutely crushing and hold you down the rest of your life.

Good luck in your college endeavor.
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Last edited by Cajundaddy at Sep 25, 2014,