#1
Hello,


I'm standing on the chosing between new accoustic amp for my Yamaha electro-accoustiq guitar. How do you think what would be better:
to use very cheap solid amp like Laney LG12 + preamplifier multi effet Yahama AG STOMP ( for me it will be cost of 20+80 euro) or alternatively to buy some accoustic AMP (I dont have any ideas here yet).

Kind regards,

James
#2
The best idea would be getting a small PA system 'cause acoustic guitar amps are a bad idea.

Look for a used powered wedge by mackie/yamaha/jbl/peavey on ebay or similar.
Or get a new one.

And stay away from behringer.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Hi,

could you specify what is PA?
Also what type of amp will be best for accoustic guitar having some pieso- electronics and preamp& why just not to plug it to the tubes electric guitar combo?
#4
Quote by James Starlight
could you specify what is PA?
"A public address system (PA system) is an electronic sound amplification and distribution system with a microphone, amplifier and loudspeakers, used to allow a person to address a large public, for example for announcements of movements at large and noisy air and rail terminals."

Wikipedia strikes again.
Quote by James Starlight
Also what type of amp will be best for accoustic guitar having some pieso- electronics and preamp
Quote by Spambot_2
acoustic guitar amps are a bad idea.
Also it's called piezo, not pieso.
Quote by James Starlight
why just not to plug it to the tubes electric guitar combo?
Electric guitar amps are designed to modify the sound of what you put through it, and acoustic guitars passed through them don't sound like acoustic guitars much.

You want a PA system.

If you absolutely wanna get an acoustic guitar amp, invest all your money in that and skip the fancy fx pedals.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
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#5
There are some good acoustic amps out there but they are kind of like finding Bigfoot. Stay away from running your acoustic through an electric guitar amp.

A lot depends on the guitar. If your guitar sounds good acoustically, then try to run it through the PA system. If not try an acoustic guitar preamp first then into the PA. I have a Taylor 414 that I run through a 31 band EQ and then into a Boulder acoustic amp ($600) or straight through a condenser mic and into the PA.

I used to play an Epiphone EJ200 and would run that through an acoustic preamp, EQ, and into a Fender acoustic amp. That worked OK for stage use.

As a general rule of thumb, most acoustics sound better run through the PA system than through an acoustic amplifier.
#6
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
An acoustic guitar actually has a wider range than most electrics, and to get them to sound right, the speakers have to have a wider range as well. They'll be capable of reproducing lower lows and higher highs, and they won't have the pronounced midrange bump that most guitar amplifiers have. Most guitar amplifiers won't reproduce much below 110Hz, nor much above 4000Hz, so an acoustic guitar played through an ordinary guitar amp will be boomy at one frequency and muffled at others.

Here in the US, I'd direct you to companies like Carvin that have great amps that are designed specifically for acoustic amplification.



The one illustrated has two 6.5" woofers and a tweeter, and there's another version with a 12" woofer and tweeter. Both amps are closed back and ported to reproduce the bottom end with clarity. You can see some of the other features.

Another possibility, one mentioned previously, is to find a powered speaker (like the acoustic amplifier, the amplification is built into the speaker) like the kind ordinarily used for Pro Audio and band monitors.

Again, Carvin for an illustration. A small mixer built into the back of the speaker allows a modest EQ and the ability to run several different kinds of instrument into the speaker, but it's essentially designed to simply reproduce whatever's fed into it. These are increasingly being used *instead* of a traditional guitar amp by people who use modelers to shape their tone. In the bottom photo, the player is using the green guitar, the modeler on the floor on the right and the PM12A Carvin speaker on the amp stand as his amp, and the old X100B tube amp and vintage 2x12 speaker on the left are unused:




The PM12A Carvin speaker shown actually has 400W RMS of power, but is lightweight enough (just under 30 pounds) to one-hand into any gig.
#8
thanks alot for the suggestions!

btw how do you think what kind of sound could be expected in I plug my Yamaha accoustic guitar to the Yamaha AG atomp external pream and then directly to FX return (avoiding of the amp preamp) of my tube Night Train combo? Two questions: i) is it a good idea to connect 2 preamps (yamaha's guitar self + tonelab) which might has mismatching in impedances ii) connect tonelab with AMP and again impedance problem
#9
1. chaining pre's results in distortion most of the times, though with levels THAT low you might as well do it, 9 out of 10 it'll work just fine.

2. no impedance problems connecting a pre output to a power amp's input.

Also yeah the EVM12L cab is a nice idea.
Then get another one if you gotta gig and you're set.

I mean you could as well gig with only one cab, but IMO two cabs make a difference in a live setting.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#10
I've told about
that

yamaha's guitar native pream has output impedance 1 Kilo oM
yamaha AG STOMP has input impedance 1 meha Ohm

this is big mismatch between them so the signal from the guitar's pream (on some frequencies) will be seriously dampled by AG stomp pream wil not it?
#11
Quote by James Starlight
this is big mismatch between them so the signal from the guitar's pream (on some frequencies) will be seriously dampled by AG stomp pream wil not it?
In audio applications, impedance mismatch is a good thing.

Ideally, the input you're sending signal to would have 10 times the impedance of the output you're sending the signal from.

So if specs are to be trusted, the impedance values are just about right.

They likely aren't to be trusted, as more or less every spec provided by the manufacturer, though the difference from the specs will not be much and you'll not have any problem with that.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.