#3
"I have different theories and the only way for me to make sure, is if someone suggests the same key, I think of."

I read that as, "I have no idea what key its in but can't let JRF know that"

I concur, A minor.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
Quote by MapOfYourHead
Yes, we know it's a minor key, but which one????????



MapOfYourHead

Often sarcastic


Last edited by wolflen at Sep 27, 2014,
#6
Quote by MapOfYourHead
Yes, we know it's a minor key, but which one????????

You win.

Quote by Jet Penguin

I read that as, "I have no idea what key its in but can't let JRF know that"

Last edited by jazz_rock_feel at Sep 27, 2014,
#7
Do you know how to figure out the key of a song? Do you know what you need to listen to to find the key?

Listen to the chords. Try to figure out the "home chord", ie the tonic. You will feel pull towards that chord. And when you play that chord, it feels resolved. That is your key.

The chords in the song are F-G-Em-Am. The last chord of this progression is your tonic. Many times in chord progression the tonic is either the first or the last chord (because it just feels good to start/end the progression with the tonic). But of course that's not how it always goes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#8
All right, so I originally thought it was in E-Minor.

Not that it makes a huge difference, as I am only trying to find keys, in order to learn music theory in more practical manners. But! This site claims that the song is in C Major:

http://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtdFPE.asp?ppn=MN0135344

As this is a site, and anyone could probably have written something, I trust UG more. (As there are plenty of users confirming it's A-minor). But as I was totally wrong with my original assumption, what is the reason why you believe it's A-minor and for example not C Major or E-Minor.

Do you know how to figure out the key of a song? Do you know what you need to listen to to find the key?

Listen to the chords. Try to figure out the "home chord", ie the tonic. You will feel pull towards that chord. And when you play that chord, it feels resolved. That is your key.

The chords in the song are F-G-Em-Am. The last chord of this progression is your tonic. Many times in chord progression the tonic is either the first or the last chord (because it just feels good to start/end the progression with the tonic). But of course that's not how it always goes.


Oh, great.. We posted at the same time, so I didn't get to read your reply before I posted.

But you're totally right, didn't really even consider that. I just began humming, trying to find the one that sounds most natural between a few notes.
Last edited by ikouroshi at Sep 27, 2014,
#9
Quote by ikouroshi
All right, so I originally thought it was in E-Minor.

Not that it makes a huge difference, as I am only trying to find keys, in order to learn music theory in more practical manners. But! This site claims that the song is in C Major:

http://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtdFPE.asp?ppn=MN0135344


No, it doesn't. Or, at least, not really. I mean, yes, there's that little transposition thing there, but the key signature has no flats and no sharps, which means EITHER A minor or C major.

So then you've got to listen to it and see where it sounds resolved.

But you're totally right, didn't really even consider that. I just began humming, trying to find the one that sounds most natural between a few notes.


I find that this technique often lands me on the fifth in minor keys.

Better is to sing the melody line, and see where it feels resolved. Train your ear functionally and you'll hear that an E "sounds like a fifth" where A "sounds like a tonic."

Listening for clashes isn't great, because the difference between the diatonic notes between Am and Em is one note: F vs F#. But F# is a note you hear a lot when A is your tonic (because F# minor is the relative minor to A major) - the major sixth really only rarely clashes in minor contexts.
#11
Quote by HotspurJr
No, it doesn't. Or, at least, not really. I mean, yes, there's that little transposition thing there, but the key signature has no flats and no sharps, which means EITHER A minor or C major.


Actually, it does claim that. Scroll down the page and look at the right, and it says "Original Key C Major".

A music site being totally wrong in their description??

That never happens!

/sarcasm

Best,

Sean