#1
Like when you take a D shape and can play a all the other chords with just moving a fret how do you do this with other chords shapes? I have seen taking a A major shape and playing a D major or playing a D major with a Cmajor open shape? Can someone explain the concept of this i dont understand it. Or does anyone know of a video or article that explains it well? THANKS
#2
You've pretty much explained it. Move the whole shape to a different fret, get a different chord. The only catch is coming up with a new fingering that allows you to move the open notes. For instance. You can take the C major shape, x32010, and move it up to x54232 making it a D chord. The trick is, this requires a new fingering.
#3
Well, A good way to discover this, if you don't know the notes on the neck, or chords.

Take that D shape.

Then decide what chord you want. Let's say it's A

So you want to move the D shape till it's an A chord.

Google "Notes of the A Major chord"

Google "Notes on the Guitar Neck"

Use the information on both with your guitar in hand to find these answers.

If you know your notes on the neck and the notes of any chord, already, then you simply apply that knowledge to the guitar. Chords are played using those specific notes of the chord on the guitar neck.

Good luck, and have fun exploring.

Best,

Sean
#4
What about 3 note chord or 3 finger chords may be a better way to say it chords that are small and simple enough to play fills in between or slide into
#5
Well, this is kind of the point of barre chords, right? I mean, we're all familiar with the typical Emajor chord:


And the Fmajor barre chord:


If you look at both, they're the same basic shape, but the F is a fret higher. We can do this with just about any chord on the guitar (provided the fingering isn't too clumsy). Jazz guitarists are absolute geniuses with this kind of thing. I'd recommend you read the following basic lesson (from Jens Larsen) and gain some food for thought:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/jazz_chord_survival_kit_by_jens_larsen.html

The thing to notice in the above lesson (as it applies to your question, directly) is that most of the chords could be said to be the same shape as other chords of the same type. For instance, there's a common shape to many of the m7 chords and likewise to the maj7 chords. These aren't barre (not most of them); they're just different shapes that result in different chords, depending upon where on the neck they are played. Neat, huh?

Edit:
Quote by mattousley
What about 3 note chord or 3 finger chords may be a better way to say it chords that are small and simple enough to play fills in between or slide into

The same concept applies.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 29, 2014,
#6
Quote by mattousley
What about 3 note chord or 3 finger chords may be a better way to say it chords that are small and simple enough to play fills in between or slide into


Well, understanding the key of the piece helps, because those chords are usually part of that key.

It really depends upon you doesnt it?

If you learn basic diatonic harmony, you'll be able to find these most of the time. If you go beyond, you might be able to suss out the bVII when its used. It all depends upon you. You'll either get a good ear from lots of practice and immersion in pitch collections, or you'll learn some theory and logical deduction.

I'll take understanding a piece any day, given the two choices. It's much faster and immensely more satisfying, than always seeing music as an abstract that sounds good and works for some reason, but not know why.

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by mattousley
Like when you take a D shape and can play a all the other chords with just moving a fret how do you do this with other chords shapes? I have seen taking a A major shape and playing a D major or playing a D major with a Cmajor open shape? Can someone explain the concept of this i dont understand it. Or does anyone know of a video or article that explains it well? THANKS


THere's not much to it. Do you like the sound? Then play it.

This works when the open strings harmonize well with the strings you're fretting.
#8
A triad is three notes. A root, a third, and a fifth.

In the case of a major triad it's a root, major third, and perfect fifth.

In the case of a minor triad it's a root, a minor third, and a perfect fifth.

When the root note of the chord is the lowest note in the chord it is said to be in root position. When the third is the lowest note in the chord it is said to be in first inversion.
When the fifth is the lowest note in the chord it is said to be in second inversion.

When you play a major triad on the guitar and use more than three strings you have to double up on one or more of the notes in the chord. However if you play the chord on just three strings then you want to hit each of the notes of that triad at least once.

You can work out ways to do this on each set of three strings....

If you take the e b g strings strings for example then you can find different ways to play the root third and fifth on each of those strings.

If we just consider E major chord for example then we need a root (E), major third(G#) and perfect fifth(B). And if we start just looking at the bottom three strings then we want to find each of those notes on each string...

[B]E[/B]|---|---|---|-G#|---|---|-B-|---|---|---|---|-E-|---|---|
[B]B[/B]|---|---|---|---|-E-|---|---|---|-G#|---|---|-B-|---|---|
g|-G#|---|---|-B-|---|---|---|---|-E-|---|---|---|-G#|---|


If we want to get all three notes of the E major triad on the bottom three strings then there are three basic shapes that achieve this. One represents each inversion of the major triad.


e string ->|-1-|---|---|
b string ->|-5-|---|---|  <--Note this is the same "shape" as the E major open chord shape)
g string ->|---|-3-|---|    but limited only to the top three strings

e string ->|-3-|---|---|
b string ->|---|-1-|---| <--Note this is the same "shape" as the D major open chord shape
g string ->|-5-|---|---|    but limited only to the top three strings

e string ->|-5-|---|---|
b string ->|---|---|-3-| <--Note this is the same "shape" as the A major open chord shape
g string ->|---|---|-1-|    but limited only to the top three strings


Then all you do is slide the shape up or down to line the Root note (1) with the root note of the chord you want. So if you want an A major chord then you would slide that first shape to the place on the fretboard where the 1 lines up with an "A" note on that particular string.

For example the first shape shown above has the root note on the E string. The A note on the E string is found at the fifth fret. So we slide that shape up so that the 1 is on the fifth fret of the E string and we have an A Major chord in first inversion.

The second shape above has the root note on the B string. The "A" note on the B string is on the 10th fret. So slide that shape up so the "1" in that shape is on the 10th fret and you have an A major chord (second inversion)

The third shape above has a root note on the G string. The "A" note on the G string is on the 2nd fret (or the 14th fret) so you slide that shape so the "1" is on the 2nd fret (or the 14th fret) and you have an A major triad in first inversion.

If instead you want a minor chord then the difference between a major and minor triad is that the major third is lowered a half step. To do this you lower the 3rd in each shape by one fret. Thus you get...

|-1-|---|---|
|-5-|---|---|  <--Note this is the same "shape" as the E minor open chord shape
|-b3|---|---|    playing only the top three strings (e, b, g strings)

|-b3|---|---|
|---|---|-1-| <--Note this is the same "shape" as the D minor open chord shape
|---|-5-|---|    playing only the top three strings (e, b, g strings)

|-5-|---|---|
|---|-b3|---| <--Note this is the same "shape" as the A major open chord shape
|---|---|-1-|    playing only the top three strings (e, b, g strings)

Note how the shapes are the same as the major shapes with the third lowered one fret.


You can do the same thing with any three string combination.

If we use the B G D strings for example...This time we will find the notes of an A major chord on the D G B strings. The notes of the A major chord are Root=A, Major Third=C# and Perfect Fifth=E.

e|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
b|---|-C#|---|---|-E-|---|---|---|---|-A-|---|---|---|---|
g|---|-A-|---|---|---|-C#|---|---|-E-|---|---|---|---|---|
D|---|-E-|---|---|---|---|-A-|---|---|---|-C#|---|---|---|

So we have three basic chord shapes again (one for each inversion of the major triad). We do the same as above to find how to slide these shapes around to find different chords. If we move the C# down to a C then we get minor chord shapes.

Note that these three shapes are also part of a larger open chord shape. One is from the larger A major open chord shape, one from the larger open E major chord shape, and one from the larger open C major chord shape.

If there's anything here you don't understand just ask. If this doesn't quite explain what you're asking - then ask and I'll try again.
Si
#9
You can check CAGED systems

Basically, it stands for the chords "C", "A", "G", "E", and "D" which can be major, minor or whatever you want.
For the finger issue, you can try to use a capo (you'll be transporting here), or just playing some of the open strings, or avoid them. You don't need to play every note of the chord, you can play triads as somebody said above.
#10
With any shape, you'll have to bar the chord somehow. And E chord is actually an F chord minus the barring and down a step. A B chord is actually an A chord moved up 2 frets and barred. Capos remove the issue of barring.

Then again, the normal shapes of the chords aren't always how the chord is played chromatically.