#1
Hi all,

Today I'd like to talk a little bit about wireless units. Most of them are pricy, but I am wondering if it's worth the money. Is there such thing as a cable?

How good is a 100$ unit (like the Joyo ones) compared to some others? Do they transmit signal and pedalboard well usually?

I picked up a wireless unit today, just because I like to walk around the house while playing, or simply sit on the couch and watching TV and with cables it's kind of a hassle sometimes.. It's an Audio-Technica 700 serie. Any good for shows? Seems like I'm getting a little bit of lagging (on bass, could not try on guitar tonight). I'll probably stick with cables anyhow, but still good to know what it can do.

Thank you!
#2
I used to say, "Buy any wireless you want as long as it's at least $500 and says Shure on the label."

These days, you can get a serviceable wireless if you spend a couple of hundred and buy a Line 6 G30 digital. You can get a professional grade wireless if you spend another hundred and a half and get the G50.

There are other brands, to be sure (no soundalike pun intended), and Shure is back in the game with a very good digital wireless. You can certainly spend more (Lectrasonic comes to mind), but the G50 is sort of a benchmark (I have a G90) in the industry at the moment.

There are certainly wireless units available below the G30's pricetag, but they're all missing things, like range/noise, RF suppression/clear reproduction, etc.

What do you mean by "is there such thing as a cable?"
#3
I'd love to know how those Joyos perform. Undoubtedly you'd have to inspect it for ****s ups caused by the work of dyslexic monkeys on meth - but if you sort out their assembly **** ups and they work ok, they'd be a mighty cheap option. Joyo stuff needs to be treated as a repair job. If it's the sort of price you'd part with for a faulty unit you'd have to repair then they're acceptable, and often that is the case. They're usually cheaper than the cost of the parts.

But yeah, I agree - Line 6 Relay.
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#4
I've had this low grade AKG SR40 wireless for a while, and I have even done some gigs with it.
Considering reliability, it has never put me down, even if we played in centre of town it did not pick up any interference, there was just signal from my guitar.
Considering sound quality, at first I was not impressed but if you mess with the gain knobs (both on transmitter and receiver) you can squeeze quite a nice sound out of it, especially with distorted guitar.
I didn't expect anything special but this overcame my expectations. I am satisfied.
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#5
These days, you can get a serviceable wireless


Right. But how do you compare units to know wich is best? Plug and listen? There is no sounic difference (or close to no) between cheap and expensive cables. Same game?

the work of dyslexic monkeys on meth


they must be really badly assembled!

Considering sound quality, at first I was not impressed but if you mess with the gain knobs


That is one thing I'm still learning how to set up to optimum performance.
#6
Quote by Taz9
Right. But how do you compare units to know wich is best? Plug and listen? There is no sounic difference (or close to no) between cheap and expensive cables. Same game?


No, it's easier and much more practical. To ascertain working range, you walk away from the amp. When it gets sketchy, you're at the outer edge of its range. Range can vary quite a bit depending on other factors, but the more range it has ordinarily (even if you don't USE all that range), the more reliable it will be at the ranges you DO use. The G30 does NOT have the same range as the G50, for example.

Bad wireless will often pick up radio stations, hissing, pops, random wandering radio frequencies generated by neon signs, etc. Good wireless will eliminate that stuff automagically.

Bad wireless will make you say bad words when they don't work correctly. You won't notice good wireless, because they're simply doing their job. Unless they run out of battery of course -- but that's because the human who was supposed to charge (or replace) the batteries wasn't doing HIS job. In that case, you'll be directing the bad words to the human, and not the wireless.

Cables are easy to spot. The expensive ones are sprinkled with fairy dust and unicorn farts, even though they may sound pretty much identical to each other.Everyone knows that.

Wireless units are one of those areas where you usually get what you pay for.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 29, 2014,
#7
I was tossing up one of those Joyo units, went for a Line 6 g30, only problem I have is remembering to turn off the receiver on my strap. The g50's more sturdy, being made of metal and all, but the g30 is fine if you're just after a wireless system for kicks. Never had an issue with the gadget itself, the main complaint I saw about the g30 was the receiver was a bit cheap and the battery compartment door isn't the best mechanism, but hey, it's a great unit for the money.