#1
Hello. I am using Studio One 2.6 to record a heavy metal song. The song is in A minor and E minor. I used their loops to make a really basic drum track with bass and snare. Studio One lets you change the pitch of the drum track by changing the values in the transpose and tune fields in the "Inspector." I can obviously do this, but I don't know if I should be doing it.

From the best I could tell, the drums were in the key of G, though I am honestly not sure. I relied on my ear, I don't know how to get the software to tell me, and I have IMPERFECT pitch.

Thanks.
#2
Some people do like to tune the drums to the key of the song, but personally I never really heard much of a difference. As long as the drums are in tune with themselves, I think they sound fine.

But try changing the tuning and listen for yourself, and see if you like it.
#3
If you're not using concert toms (no reso heads) nobody will care.
Also if you do, nobody will care.

It's an exaggerated overthinking of the thing.
You don't need to do that.

I mean do it if you want to, but it will bring no noticeable change just because the pitch is changed.

Tune drums to sound good before tuning them to a specific note.
And then don't tune them to a specific note.

That's just me though.
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#4
just the toms can be tuned realistically, the BD/snare a bit maybe, but worth doing if you can IMO

I think it depends on the song, if there is a lot of toms interacting with the bass, might get some good melodies
Last edited by Tempoe at Sep 29, 2014,
#6
Honestly, I think they sound a little better than they did at first, though I honestly don't know if they are in the same key or not as I am relying on my ear. But I suppose that's a separate question. Thanks.
#7
Quote by Enry82
wont they get lost in the mix somehow?


In what way? If they are in tune or out of tune?
#8
Having everything tuned to the key of the song can sound wicked, but it's rare enough that no-one will care if you don't.
#9
yeah...why wouldn't you

this is like standard in edm to at least get your kick in tune come on lads
#10
Quote by willT08
yeah...why wouldn't you

this is like standard in edm to at least get your kick in tune come on lads

Because this isn't edm it's metal? Even if you're using software drums, you should treat them like a real kit. Most of the time, you won't tune a real kit to the key of the song because for it to sound good you need to have exactly the right sized shells with the skins uniformly tight at the right pitch and it's just a bitch of a thing to set up.
Also with the software drums it's probably just a pitch shift algorithm, which won't sound particularly realistic.
#11
oh yeah i forgot you guys have to deal with limitations rather than endless possibility like me

peak for you guys
#12
Oh look, its Will.

Chatter, I don't see any reason to treat software drums like normal drums. And in EDM you don't really want realistic sounding drums anyway.

As for TS, do whatever sounds good. I wouldn't waste time trying to get them in tune on purpose, but if you do and you like it, sure thats cool too.
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#13
Oh look, its Will.

Chatter, I don't see any reason to treat software drums like normal drums. And in EDM you don't really want realistic sounding drums anyway.

As for TS, do whatever sounds good. I wouldn't waste time trying to get them in tune on purpose, but if you do and you like it, sure thats cool too.
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#14
Quote by Danjo's Guitar
Chatter, I don't see any reason to treat software drums like normal drums. And in EDM you don't really want realistic sounding drums anyway.

Right you don't, but as was said in the OP this is metal

As for why you should treat them like real drums it's quite simple: To improve the realism. If you use software drums to do things you could/would never do on a real kit, it's an instant giveaway that you didn't have a real drummer/kit and it can absolutely ruin the sound of a song.
#15
At least tune your kick to the lowest bass note played (so long as its your route note) no harm done, EDM or not, its always going to sound better
#16
^Eww that's so many levels of wrong.

1. What if the bass is bashing away on the note 1 semitone above that? that's going to be so dischordant it's not funny.

2. You've now almost guaranteed that your bass and kick are going to be fighting even harder for space than they normally are (which is a lot) because not only are they sounding in the same range, but now it's the exact same frequency.

3. See above point about realism. If I have a song in D and a song in G I'm not going to retune my kick to the new root note, and neither is anyone else. I may not even be able to tune my kick to both those notes and still have it sound good.
#17
It works for me, I don't retune a drum before recording but nearly always adjust it a few cents sometimes a semitone or two when mixing it, things like parallel compression and side chain compression can manage this as well, also if you were playing one semitone above the root note you would be playing in a locrian of phygrian mode anyway which generally gives a bit of a dissonant effect anyway

Of course everybody works differently, definitely don't tune the drum for every song, but when mixing always try it if you want to experiment with how it sits in the mix, you might just end up liking it, this is a recording board after all
#18
Having kick and bass on the exact same frequency makes it way easier to deal with them being in the same range because you everything can be ducked out evenly. Makes kicks sound thick as hell as well
#19
Reasonable minds can differ!!! He he he!!!!!!

I promise to play w/ it a little and see how I like it.

Yes, it is metal.
#20
Will - behave. This is my (and Matrix/jof's) forum section, not Musician Talk, and if you want to have fun winding up regulars, this isn't your place to do it


Anyway, in metal tuning your kick and bass to the same note is probably much worse than leaving them as they are (not to mention having to automate a kick pitch to follow a bassline, or just relying on the effect only working on a certain note) because you'll affect both when compressing the same frequency bands in mastering, where pumping might be quite desirable to electronic music but not in rock and metal.

Also, you fill out a far greater frequency spectrum by keeping instruments in their own areas of the audible frequency range - it's actually common practice to EQ the kick and bass around each other, rather than aiming to combine them in any way, and sidechaining the bass to the kick is irrelevant to frequency anyway as it's relying purely on the presence of a signal, not the closeness to a particular frequency.


selftaught - I've never bothered to tune drums to a song and when you're using real drums you always tune up to what suits the kit best... not what key your songs are in. You also tune toms differently for different effects, and tuning the reso head looser than the beater head gives a completely different effect to having them in sympathetic range, or even the reso head tighter.
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