#1
First off, a salute to my comrades guitar players from around the world.
So i`ll explain my case a little bit, i´m playing out of argentina, started playing at 11 years old, in 2008 i got my first electric guitar, a strato konckoff from somewhere in China (wich i still play to this day), this rusted axe has taken a beating since the moment i discovered dragonforce . So here i am looking for a new guitar within my price range (taking in consideration that someone right out of school makes about $2500 in their fisrt job at best, and E.G. a gibson les paul is $40 000 -yeah, 4 zeros-), wrapping it up: im in between an Ibanez grg170 dx (and hardtail that bitchy tremolo), or save me some screwdriver issues and get an ESP LTD M 10 (ten). It is the same ? It´s the tremolo still go out of tune even when blocked off (such as my strato) ?

P.D.: I play tons of power metal from oldies (Helloween) to new stuff, and looking to put together a band with a mix of power and thrash
P.D.: i can not move far from those two models
HELP WILL BE APPRECIATED.
#2
Blocked trem and hardtail both stay well in tune if you lube and tune the nut and wind your strings properly. Even a trem guitar will stay in decent tune with the same treatment and a careful setup.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
A blocked vibrato bridge is pretty much a fixed bridge, but you're spending money on functionality you're not actually using, because the bridge is blocked. Therefore buying a vibrato just to block it is nonsensical.

If you only have enough money to buy something like an LTD M10, then forget about floating bridges altogether. No vibrato bridge on a guitar that cheap is any good. Stick with fixed bridge guitars, or you're wasting money on hardware that doesn't work how it's supposed to.
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Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 29, 2014,
#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
A blocked vibrato bridge is pretty much a fixed bridge, but you're spending money on functionality you're not actually using, because the bridge is blocked. Therefore buying a vibrato just to block it is nonsensical.

If you only have enough money to buy something like an LTD M10, then forget about floating bridges altogether. No vibrato bridge on a guitar that cheap is any good. Stick with fixed bridge guitars, or you're wasting money on hardware that doesn't work how it's supposed to.


+1

Also on a side note $2500 a month is not bad money?
Phrases Label
The Bohemes
---
The White Strat w/Dimebucker
Tokai Explorer Korina
Ibanez RG570 Purple Neon
Gibson Les Paul Deluxe Ebony
Fender Telecaster Apple Red
Dano '59 Burgundy
Ibanez Artcore AM-73
#5
The thing is, I wouldn't get a guitar like an Ibanez grg170 dx. T00Deep already covered why you shouldn't bother buying a guitar with a floating trem to block it off, but I'll tell you why I wouldn't buy a cheap guitar that has a floating trem. (Also, Cajundaddy is correct.)

See, the materials the trem is made out of are important, to prevent the trem from flexing and warping over time. With these cheaper guitars, you generally get trems made out of cheaper materials. This means they're more of a pain to deal with than higher end floating trems. Furthermore, because of the trem, there's usually a sacrifice made in the qaulity of the electronics. So, not only will the trem be problematic over time, the electronics also won't be as good.

For the price range of under $500 (new), I would just stick with hard tail guitars.
#6
Thank you very much guys, i´m definitely sticking with fixed bridges, hope i find the axe i want here.

PD: on my country $2500 (argentinean current money), is a MEH amount of money to earn per month