#1
So I'm interested in messing around with running two amps at home, but I'll need a second amp head to go with my Laney IRT Studio.

Because it's a home thing, I'm trying to go as low-wattage as possible, so my list of options at the moment extends to a Blackstar HT-1 or 5/HT-Metal 1 or 5, a Randall RD1H or RG13, or potentially the 15-watt Ironheart head.

(I like the RG13 since it has EQ controls and would be easiest to fit into my limited space, but I know the IRT Studio sounds, but only need one channel on a second amp, so the IRT15H's shared EQ doesn't phase me. Also, the RG13's solid state, so make up your own minds on that debate.

I had an HT-5 before the IRT Studio, so I know its gain sounds weren't quite what I needed, but the HT-Metal does sound appealing. I don't reckon the 5-watt Blackstar's any louder than the 1-watt mode of my IRT, so the 5-watt BS with EQ controls sounds tempting too (although it's likely the biggest, heaviest unit of the contenders).

I'd go another Studio, but I don't have the rack space and the alternatives are a bit over half the cost on Thomann. A second amp would probably sit on top of my steel rack.)


Any ideas on which of these would be best to compliment the IRT Studio's gain sound?

Now, I don't really know a lot about bi-amping in terms of matching amps, is there anything I need to know about actual amp settings?

I'll probably get a Radial Bigshot ABY to switch amps with, since that has a ground lift feature (otherwise, there's a couple of cheaper name brand ABY's I was considering if the ground loop lift wasn't essential, a Fender ABY, the EH Switchblade or one of the Morley ABY's, for instance).

Excuse my ramble, hopefully some of that makes sense. Any constructive advice is always appreciated. Thanks!
#2
I'm a bit confused. What sort of sound are you after for the second amp?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#3
You're not "bi-amping."

You're just plugging into two different amps.

That term is usually reserved for speakers that have two amps internally with a crossover preceding them, that use one amp for the HF driver and one for the LF driver.

From Wiki:

"Bi-amping" is the use of two channels of amplification to power each loudspeaker within an audio system. "Tri-amping" is the practice of connecting three channels of amplification to a loudspeaker unit: one to power the bass driver (woofer), one to power the mid-range and the third to power the treble driver (tweeter).
#4
Quote by staceap
the IRT15H's shared EQ doesn't phase me.


As long as I'm being a nazi about this, the expression is "doesn't faze me."

faze
fāz/
verb
informal
verb: faze; 3rd person present: fazes; past tense: fazed; past participle: fazed; gerund or present participle: fazing

disturb or disconcert (someone).
"she was not fazed by his show of anger"

As for the whole two-amps thing; You need to first decide what you want to accomplish and if two amps are necessary to accomplish it and THEN pick out the appropriate gear to do it. You haven't worked out the first two yet. So advice on the appropriate gear won't be forthcoming except in the random.

There are a LOT of ways that people use two amps. One for dry, one for wet. One for cleans, one for gain. Stereo pair for special effects, and so on. Folks who have Pod X3s and HDs can set up two completely different virtual "rigs" and then pan one right, one left and run them out of a stereo PA system (or two sides of a stereo power amp and from there into separate speaker cabinets). This is an infinitely easier setup to work with than dealing with two truly separate amplifiers and the necessary switching, etc. That said, Clapton has had five or six amps, each one miked separately, stuffed under a stage with a tech doing the switching manually according to a scripted set list and instructions.
#5
Quote by dspellman
You're not "bi-amping."

You're just plugging into two different amps.

That term is usually reserved for speakers that have two amps internally with a crossover preceding them, that use one amp for the HF driver and one for the LF driver.

From Wiki:

"Bi-amping" is the use of two channels of amplification to power each loudspeaker within an audio system. "Tri-amping" is the practice of connecting three channels of amplification to a loudspeaker unit: one to power the bass driver (woofer), one to power the mid-range and the third to power the treble driver (tweeter).


Eh, I figured I was probably using the wrong phrase.
#6
Quote by dspellman
As long as I'm being a nazi about this, the expression is "doesn't faze me."

faze
fāz/
verb
informal
verb: faze; 3rd person present: fazes; past tense: fazed; past participle: fazed; gerund or present participle: fazing

disturb or disconcert (someone).
"she was not fazed by his show of anger"

As for the whole two-amps thing; You need to first decide what you want to accomplish and if two amps are necessary to accomplish it and THEN pick out the appropriate gear to do it. You haven't worked out the first two yet. So advice on the appropriate gear won't be forthcoming except in the random.

There are a LOT of ways that people use two amps. One for dry, one for wet. One for cleans, one for gain. Stereo pair for special effects, and so on. Folks who have Pod X3s and HDs can set up two completely different virtual "rigs" and then pan one right, one left and run them out of a stereo PA system (or two sides of a stereo power amp and from there into separate speaker cabinets). This is an infinitely easier setup to work with than dealing with two truly separate amplifiers and the necessary switching, etc. That said, Clapton has had five or six amps, each one miked separately, stuffed under a stage with a tech doing the switching manually according to a scripted set list and instructions.


You'd think, being the son of two English teachers, I'd have known that. Oh well, just one small part of a massive schooling.
#7
Quote by staceap
You'd think, being the son of two English teachers, I'd have known that. Oh well, just one small part of a massive schooling.


I usually just blame age and the massive amount of crap I've shoved into my brain over the years including four years of Latin, two years of Attic Greek, four years of German and a spouse that can't decide whether to use Mandarin or Cantonese (and thus mixes the two) when she's castigating me at high volume. That and, of course, the effects of an extreme oversampling of sex, drugs and rock & roll.
#8
So wot ARE you trying to do with two amps?

Cathbard might get testy if he doesn't get an answer.
#9
Correct
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#10
Dunno if there's a better way to put it, but essentially, I'm trying to get a bit closer to a recorded sound, same sort of effect as double-tracking, but obviously by running two amps for jamming purposes. I'm currently playing through a Harley Benton G212 Vintage, so I was planning to take two amps and play one through each speaker in stereo (which would basically be parallel, right?).

The cab's 8 ohm, but I can run the two speakers separate at 16 ohms each (I know my Studio can be adjusted for 8 or 16 ohm impedance). Now I think of it, it's probably not overly practical for just playing at home, and it'd probably be better if I were using a 412 rather than a 212, but ya know, G.A.S. 'n' stuff. What do you guys think?
#11
I'd call it a bit wanky, actually.

And that will not make it sound double tracked. Not at all. Not even close.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#12
ha, you're probably right, you can tell I have no idea what I'm talking about, hey.
#13
Quote by staceap
Eh, I figured I was probably using the wrong phrase.



I think you meant to say "phraze."


JK LOL WTFBBQBRB
#14
Quote by Fagmotron 3000
I think you meant to say "phraze."


Fraze.

"To bollix something so thoroughly that your grandmother wets her knickers laughing at you."
#15
explain him multitracking. he is confused.
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#16
OK.
Double tracking is playing the same thing multiple times onto different tracks and then mixing them together. It isn't the different tones that gives it the effect, often it's got the same tone on each track. What gives it that richness that you can't replicate outside of the studio is the variations in playing. Not tone - playing. Those minute timing changes and picking variations etc. - that's what does it.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band