#1
Hey guys, this is my first post in a long time so I'll give you as much information as I can.

RIG:
Peavey 6505+ 112
MXR 10 Band
ISP Decimator 2
Boss TU-2
PRS Guitars (in Drop B, A#, Drop C, and Standard/Drop D)

Now, I used to use dedicated pedals for my effects (flange, delay, chorus, phase, wah) but recently my friend bought the Line 6 M5 and I'm honestly wondering why I even bother with all these pedals and cords? It honestly sounds pretty good and I'm thinking about just throwing one in the FX Loop of my 6505+ 112 and being done with it.

I have done lots of research and found nothing but good reviews for the Zoom effects pedals and I prefer the aesthetics of them over the Line 6. What do you guys think? I appreciate personal experiences and preferences. Should I be looking at other pedals? I don't want to spend more than $500 on this, but I may consider it seeing as it's an all-in-one solution.
#2
I prefer the Zoom as well. I have a G3 in my amp's effects loop for all the modulations & delays etc I use, it does a great job and the interface is excellent. Just like having a few individual stompboxes.

The other advantages the Zoom has over Line 6's M series is all the extra features. It includes amp/cab sims, looper, drum sequencer (that auto-synchs to the looper) and a USB interface, so as well as being a great pedal to have on your board, it's also good for silent practice & can be hooked up direct to a PA in case of emergencies at gigs etc.

Don't get me wrong, the Line 6 is a great pedal too, probably equal to the Zoom in terms of quality, but IMO the Zoom wins on useability & extras. Trouble is, this is one of those subjective things where just as many people will have the opposite opinion.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
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#3
Quote by GaryBillington
I prefer the Zoom as well. I have a G3 in my amp's effects loop for all the modulations & delays etc I use, it does a great job and the interface is excellent. Just like having a few individual stompboxes.

The other advantages the Zoom has over Line 6's M series is all the extra features. It includes amp/cab sims, looper, drum sequencer (that auto-synchs to the looper) and a USB interface, so as well as being a great pedal to have on your board, it's also good for silent practice & can be hooked up direct to a PA in case of emergencies at gigs etc.

Don't get me wrong, the Line 6 is a great pedal too, probably equal to the Zoom in terms of quality, but IMO the Zoom wins on useability & extras. Trouble is, this is one of those subjective things where just as many people will have the opposite opinion.

I'm glad to hear some love for the Zoom since that is what I am leaning towards.

Anyone else?
#4
The Zoom is great. About the only thing it struggles with is Fender clean tones in the amp modeling.
#5
Quote by fly135
The Zoom is great. About the only thing it struggles with is Fender clean tones in the amp modeling.

Ah ok, which is fine because I just need it for effects, not modelling. Thank you
#6
But the amp models on the zoom are great for headphone practice.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#7
Quote by lucky1978
But the amp models on the zoom are great for headphone practice.

I have a practice amp already. Yamaha THR10X. Thing is an absolute beast.

Looks like the Zoom wins!
#8
The G3 is in Ace Frehley's gear list for effects....

http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/21374-ace-frehley-cosmic-space-invasion?page=2

How about effects?
The only pedal I used was the Zoom G3 [pulls pedal out of duffle bag]. I’ve been using Zoom stuff for a long time. It’s quick and you can dial up sounds fast. It’s like having three boxes in front of you. I was using Echoplexes, but I got sick and tired of the tapes breaking and the noise.

What sounds are you using from the G3?
I like the tape delay effect and the Big Muff sound, because I used a Big Muff years ago. In general though, I try to stay away from effects as much as I can. With Pro Tools now, you get a good sound, and you can play with it using plug-ins. Sometimes it’s better to go that way when you’re recording because you’re never married to the effect. You get more flexibility in the mixing process. If you record the effect into the mic, you can’t get rid of it.
Last edited by fly135 at Oct 1, 2014,