#1
I use 13-56 gauge strings (wound third, tuned to A#,F,A#,D#,G,C) on my guitar and the 4th, 5th, and 6th strings keep breaking at the bridge. My guitar does have a new Fender standard tremolo bridge, but I had the top 3 saddles filed down for the thicker strings. I do have my action set very high to get rid of fret buzz and because I just prefer it that way. Is strings constantly breaking just something I'm going to have to deal with since my action is so high or might there be another reason?

I've had this problem with both Ernie Ball and D'Addario strings.
#2
First thing I'd suspect would be that after being filed down the saddles weren't smoothed out enough and there are burrs or rough spots causing the break.

Get the saddles looked at again and get a bunch of graphite in there after they've been polished up.
#3
Yeah I'd say the saddles are the likely culprit. You shouldn't be breaking .13's, especially the E, A and D strings!
#4
Yeah, I had the same problem on the A string of my SG. I asked a local guitar tech about it and he said to use incredibly fine sandpaper (the stuff that pretty much feels like paper) on it and it worked brilliantly. What sort of bridge is it?
#5
Hmm, okay I'll go see if I can get the saddles filed down again. Another thing I forgot to mention is that I use a capo quite often. As far as I understand it, capos do make the strings break faster, but I don't know if it makes them break down at the bridge.

Quote by ThrashingDeath
Yeah, I had the same problem on the A string of my SG. I asked a local guitar tech about it and he said to use incredibly fine sandpaper (the stuff that pretty much feels like paper) on it and it worked brilliantly. What sort of bridge is it?


Ah, I've got some automotive sandpaper (2200 grit if I remember correctly) back at home, so I'll be sure to try that next chance I get.
The bridge is just a regular Fender standard tremolo that you can buy for around 20 US dollars. I would have preferred a vintage, but they're so much more expensive and I didn't have the money at the time I needed it.
#6
Cratex. http://www.cratex.com/

See the icon that says "Small Wheels"? You can get those for a dremel, probably at most hardware stores.

Don't worry about the dremel itself, just use the Cratex by hand to smooth out the saddle grooves. It works great, I used it as a machinist for 8 years and I keep one of the 5 inch round sticks in my gear bag for doing...you guessed it, bridge saddles. A knife sharpens it to a v point, then of course I have to sharpen the knife, but it does the trick really well. I use the extra fine grit grey-green ones.

If you use sandpaper something in the 400 to 600 grit range will be fine enough, no need to go to the automotive grade 1500 to 2000 grit.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...