#1
What could be the cause of this? I don't hear it through the amp, just from the guitar but it's still annoying.
Ibanez Art100 (DiMarzio Evo in bridge)
Epiphone Goldtop (SD Black Winters
6505+ Head
Avatar 2x12 (Eminence Gov/Swamp Thang)
Last edited by AsOneIStand at Oct 4, 2014,
#2
Your title answers your question somewhat - "Playing too hard". This will cause fret buzz.

You could try raising the bridge on the bass side a little (as far as i know, your guitars have tune-o-matic style bridge with height adjustments at either side rather than adjustments for individual strings?) - It is normal for the action to be noticeably higher for the thicker strings as they vibrate over a wider area - even more so if you pluck the strings very hard.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
If you don't want to change the way you play, get heavier strings - if you play on 10s, 10-52 is the obvious choice - and make sure the guitar is set up appropriately for that. The heavier strings are tighter and you'll have a better time playing heavily.
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#5
If you learn to vary the intensity of your picking, you'll suddenly find you can coax a much greater range of sounds out of your guitar, much like a pianist can manage by varying the way they hit the keys.

Fact is, most guitars are actually much more versatile than their owners.
#6
People are way too fussed over a bit of buzz. Unless you are in the studio you shouldn't be to worried over a bit of buzz and even if you are it is not the end of the world. A bit of fret buzz when you pick hard is to be expected unless you want to play with horrid action.
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#7
If it just started out of the blue then you may need to adjust your neck relief as it will change.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#8
Started after I got my guitar back from a set up, though when I play with a less aggressive attack, it doesn't do it. I'm guessing the guy set the playability to HIS liking. I'm an aggressive player. I don't use a lot of gain and I tend to rely on my attack for my tone. 10's are just fine for me and it works fine for what I do even with the 46 being a bit smaller than most people like.
Ibanez Art100 (DiMarzio Evo in bridge)
Epiphone Goldtop (SD Black Winters
6505+ Head
Avatar 2x12 (Eminence Gov/Swamp Thang)
#9
Sounds like it might have been good to talk with the tech about your playing style, picks, type of music etc.. A guitar tech is going to try and get the strings as low as you can get with out buzz coming through the amp. A little audible buzz while you play not plugged in is ok but if you have your amp on and on the clean channel it shouldn't be audible through the amp.
#10
It doesn't come through on the amp, but it's still something I can hear being that the guitar is so close. Before I had pickups installed, it had no buzz with reasonably low action. I like my action a little higher, because I like a little fight with my strings when it comes to fretting. Don't ask me why, I don't know.
Ibanez Art100 (DiMarzio Evo in bridge)
Epiphone Goldtop (SD Black Winters
6505+ Head
Avatar 2x12 (Eminence Gov/Swamp Thang)