#1
So I've been making some serious progress in my speed development, and I want to share why this finally started happening after 6 years of only dreaming about such a thing. You see, my brain decided when I first started learning that the left hand was the star of the show. My left hand would play and my right hand would "keep up." Well recently, I decided to reverse the roles. I decided to turn my right hand into the "gas pedal" and make the left hand keep up. I knew that when I played single notes really fast, my picking technique was different than it normally was. It was tight and my thumb and forefinger didn't move, letting my wrist do the work. I didn't move far from the string after striking it before reversing direction. I always considered tremelo picking to be one of those things that I'd practice after I could already shred because it's a little gimmicky by itself. What I've learned is that it is a "gateway" to the speed picking mindset. I've been practicing this one (non tremelo picking) lick for about a month and a half, and I've gone from being stuck at 110 bpm for nearly 3 years to almost being able to play it at 140 (8th notes). What I do is "rev up the lick" by picking the first note of the lick along to the metronome (like Sonic the Hedgehog) and then letting the left hand take off. If I mess up, it won't be because my picking wasn't tight. Muscle memory for the left hand is vital for this, so repetition at very slow speeds over time is very important. When playing slow, try to make your pick move exactly like it would look if you recorded yourself playing one note really fast and slowed it down. I know when I play slow, I tend to "scoop" at the string rather than attack it in a straight back-and-forth line like you should. I am very excited because I feel like I've overcome a serious barrier to finally being able to play the kind of music I love, and I feel an obligation to share this insight in case it would help another struggling student of the speed academy.
#2
Hey,
Im in the whole "Left hand fly's but the right lags behind" .... Im gonna try this !! any examples tho??
cheers
#3
in all seriousness, speed is all technique, and you're right, your picking hand drives it, not your left hand, you just have to learn to sync the two, this is the same for tremolo picking, sweep picking, and legato playing, once you have that down the speed limit tends to disappear
#4
There's some picking exercises that will give you some serious speed. Building speed is easy when you understand how to practice both your hands have to be synced if not you won't be able to breach speed barriers if anything practicing scales is both a good left, and right hand exercise, but to really develop speed you need dead on accurate picking or it won't ever happen. It's good to see that you've breached that barrier that you've been stuck on for 6 years, but I'd advise you to take it slow with the metronome, and not play as fast as you possibly can that just leads to bad sloppy habits. Slow down then build up practice a lick you're trying to get up to speed with a metronome slowly for exactly one minute straight then when you can do that lick at whatever "Said" speed you're at then bump it up 5 BPM.


A lot of people just tend to make things harder than they should be I also notice your post about your left hand flying? That's a more than common problem which really handicaps you the only way you can really play fast is by making small precise movements your left hand fingers flying off the fret board won't lead you to building any really speed. Look on the youtube for the "minimum movement" exercise that should fix your left hand problem if anything practice that for a minute straight each day.

If you don't fix that problem you'll just end up getting stuck at a certain speed again good luck dude!
Last edited by Black_devils at Oct 5, 2014,
#5
Holy lack of punctuation/legibility batman.

The analogy you're using is best described by Paul Gilbert (imo) where you develop legato technique in order to steer, then bring your picking up to speed (the gas pedal)

But all this technique is absolutely worthless if you can't express ideas over chord changes.


But we're here for technique:

TS, try the PG Intense Rock licks. Count upstrokes in a syncopated picking pattern and gradually increase speed. Then make the intervals larger and larger but stop just short of massive claw hand, tension inducing, triads (shawn lane shit). Shredding shapes in octaves will make you so damn fast you'll surprise yourself.

Try all the picking techniques, yet articulate the same idea with your left hand.

alt Pick 1 note per string arpeggios ala Steve Morse

Then chickin pick the same arpeggio ideas

Then sweep them

Then incorporate more notes per string and economy pick them

Then swybyrd pick them

Then change notes and repeat the picking cycle again with syncopation variations depending on your level of comfort.

Then take a roman shower, to loosen the absurdly tight neuro muscular tension you'll probably have. Seriously Steve Morse developed tendonitis because of yadayadayada stretch and apply heat guise. I really hope this post isn't as condescending as it seems when I preview it.
Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

DJENT!!
ಠ_ಠ
#6
So the gas pedal analogy isn't mine, damn. Well it's good to see my mind is on the right track now. I've actually been watching Paul Gilbert's Intense Rock sequences. I've only been practicing the first three licks or so. What do you mean by: "Count upstrokes in a syncopated picking pattern and gradually increase speed. Then make the intervals larger and larger but stop just short of massive claw hand, tension inducing, triads (shawn lane shit)."

And no, it didn't seem condescending to me.

Look on the youtube for the "minimum movement" exercise that should fix your left hand problem if anything practice that for a minute straight each day.


I know all about that stuff and use it. I just think it's important to play as fast as you can sometimes because it kinda preps you for being able to play properly at that speed. I know my playing at these speeds are sloppy, but it's the first time I've been able to play anything remotely shredtastic. It's like I've finally achieved super saiyan, but it is very unstable.
Last edited by Sample246 at Oct 6, 2014,
#7
Quote by Sample246



I just think it's important to play as fast as you can sometimes because it kinda preps you for being able to play properly at that speed. I know my playing at these speeds are sloppy, but it's the first time I've been able to play anything remotely shredtastic. It's like I've finally achieved super saiyan, but it is very unstable.



Actually that's a bad habit to get into you're doing more harm than good slow down dude building speed takes time. If anything there's no point in playing fast, and sloppy it sounds horrendous.. What's the point of playing fast if it's already hard to comprehend as it is by doing it sloppily? Now you're just making it even harder to understand than it already is because it has no "clarity". I know it's fun to play fast, and what not but you my friend are taking a completely bad approach. Just remember this quote "You play how you practice" so if your practicing is sloppy then your playing will be..


Focus on being as accurate as you can speed comes second nature to that there's nothing worse than a guy that can play at high speeds, but can't even articulate what he's playing. All the best guitar players with speed are extremely clean they understand how to practice well, and that's why they've gotten so fast. Like I said you really need to look up some picking exercise if your right hand is further behind than your left hand this will fix your problem.


I can't find the picking exercise video so I'll try to describe it through text. Basically you're working on three things here your down strokes, up strokes, and down up strokes. You can choose which ever order to work in, but I'd advise you to work on the down and up strokes first because it'll prepare you for your down, and up strokes. Get a metronome out, and mute all your strings with your left hand remember you're working solely on your right hand. Once you have the metronome out work on your down strokes first select a speed that you can do this exercise on perfectly maybe 8th notes at 100 Bpm would be a good start for you.


Alright so start on the high E string do all down strokes for a bar each on the E string then move onto the B string Etc. Once you hit the low E string work your way down to the A string then D string Etc. I think you get the point do that for 1 minute with complete focus. Once your done with the down strokes move onto the up strokes, and do the same thing I described with the down strokes except you're using up strokes this time. Once you're done with the up strokes move onto the down, and up strokes. If you want you can include string skipping with this exercise (look up string skipping exercises, and implement with this picking exercise).


Just remember this once you're doing these picking exercises you must be extremely focused do them for a minute straight for each stroke. This will improve your picking massively. Once you get 8th's you can move onto 16th notes once you get 16th notes you can move onto sextuplets once you get sextuplets you can move onto 32nd notes. This will help with developing speed, and accuracy your right hand will make quick improvements. If you get a certain exercise down perfectly at "said" speed bump the metronome up 5 Bpm then continue this process for as long as you want until you hit your desired speed.


EDIT: I was looking around youtube, and I found a video that explains this exercise pretty well here's the link to said video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1ETtvhPqdQ

Last edited by Black_devils at Oct 6, 2014,
#8
Quote by Black_devils
Actually that's a bad habit to get into you're doing more harm than good slow down dude building speed takes time.


I don't think you're getting what I'm saying. I do all of those things. They have been the core of my practice for years now. I just think it is important to SOMETIMES play faster than you can cleanly to at least get your mind familiar with the feeling of playing fast, and because it's fun as hell when it's new. I still spend about 80% of my practice playing well within my abilities, and even hyper slowed down many times for extra focus.
#9
Quote by Sample246
I don't think you're getting what I'm saying. I do all of those things. They have been the core of my practice for years now. I just think it is important to SOMETIMES play faster than you can cleanly to at least get your mind familiar with the feeling of playing fast, and because it's fun as hell when it's new. I still spend about 80% of my practice playing well within my abilities, and even hyper slowed down many times for extra focus.
Quick question did you just get into building speed? Or have you been trying to build speed for years?
#10
This is for alternate picking, which is probably the most important technique if you want to play typical shred. I'm going to assume you're familiar with:

Picking with the wrist, not the fingers, elbow or whole arm.

Minimizing tension in your body; hands, wrists, arms, shoulders (difficult), anywhere else.

Minimizing movements in the picking and fretting hand. This mainly comes with relaxation but should be practised, just don't use tension to keep your fingers from flying up - relax them off the string instead.

Holding the pick without squeezing or otherwise causing tension, and angling the pick depending on the tone you want.

Playing both up and down strokes cleanly with dynamics, and playing them in time.

If you can't do something listed here, you should read the pinned posts on this forum regarding technique and look at some of the picking threads that have already been posted here.

If you can do that then you should be able to alternate pick with fairly good technique, regardless of whether you can pick fast or not. To build speed you just need to practice picking with this good technique while minimizing tension and motion. The whole reason behind playing slowly is so you can reprogram your muscle memory to play with more efficient (and thus faster) technique.

Most people then seem to be able to practice any kind of picking licks with decent technique (as detailed above) and get to a speed of around 120bpm 16ths on simpler stuff like 3nps and perhaps pentatonic licks. I got stuck at around this area too for a while, even when my technique seemed to be pretty decent.

The way to improve from here to is keep grinding and improving your technique, especially minimal motion and relaxation, but also to practice harder picking licks. I found that practicing very tough string skipping licks at very slow speeds made my picking much, much more controlled and this in turn improved my picking on the easier 3nps shred stuff. I'd highly recommend the string skipping picking exercise in Freepower's pinned post, as well as the picking exercise that uses every combination of picking motions.

If you do all of that right, then within a few months you'll probably make more progress than you have in the years you've been practicing before, especially if you're playing at 140bpm 8ths at the moment. It can be very frustrating to learn how to practice but once you figure it out you will make progress faster than you can dream of.

I wouldn't really play faster than you can at the moment though - Playing faster than you can cleanly in short bursts can be useful once your picking gets to a certain point, but at the speeds you say you are playing at currently I don't think it will be that helpful. I only found it to be useful after I really got my picking technique tight, otherwise when you play the fast burst you'll probably revert to tensing your elbow or other bad habits.
#11
Quote by Anon17
This is for alternate picking, which is probably the most important technique if you want to play typical shred. I'm going to assume you're familiar with:

Picking with the wrist, not the fingers, elbow or whole arm.

Minimizing tension in your body; hands, wrists, arms, shoulders (difficult), anywhere else.

Minimizing movements in the picking and fretting hand. This mainly comes with relaxation but should be practised, just don't use tension to keep your fingers from flying up - relax them off the string instead.

Holding the pick without squeezing or otherwise causing tension, and angling the pick depending on the tone you want.

Playing both up and down strokes cleanly with dynamics, and playing them in time.

If you can't do something listed here, you should read the pinned posts on this forum regarding technique and look at some of the picking threads that have already been posted here.

If you can do that then you should be able to alternate pick with fairly good technique, regardless of whether you can pick fast or not. To build speed you just need to practice picking with this good technique while minimizing tension and motion. The whole reason behind playing slowly is so you can reprogram your muscle memory to play with more efficient (and thus faster) technique.

Most people then seem to be able to practice any kind of picking licks with decent technique (as detailed above) and get to a speed of around 120bpm 16ths on simpler stuff like 3nps and perhaps pentatonic licks. I got stuck at around this area too for a while, even when my technique seemed to be pretty decent.

The way to improve from here to is keep grinding and improving your technique, especially minimal motion and relaxation, but also to practice harder picking licks. I found that practicing very tough string skipping licks at very slow speeds made my picking much, much more controlled and this in turn improved my picking on the easier 3nps shred stuff. I'd highly recommend the string skipping picking exercise in Freepower's pinned post, as well as the picking exercise that uses every combination of picking motions.

If you do all of that right, then within a few months you'll probably make more progress than you have in the years you've been practicing before, especially if you're playing at 140bpm 8ths at the moment. It can be very frustrating to learn how to practice but once you figure it out you will make progress faster than you can dream of.

I wouldn't really play faster than you can at the moment though - Playing faster than you can cleanly in short bursts can be useful once your picking gets to a certain point, but at the speeds you say you are playing at currently I don't think it will be that helpful. I only found it to be useful after I really got my picking technique tight, otherwise when you play the fast burst you'll probably revert to tensing your elbow or other bad habits.



You hit the nail right on the head! I know people that got up to 200 BPM at 16th notes with a certain set of scales just because of all the advice you, and I have posted. It's not really that hard to develop technique people just make it that way. The OP's current max speed is at 70 BPMs at 16th notes if he practices correctly he can get to 150 within 4 months.
#12
Quote by Black_devils
Quick question did you just get into building speed? Or have you been trying to build speed for years?

I've been trying for years, and using the minimum movement exercises. Problem was I didn't do it correctly for the picking hand all this time. I would use the "scooping" motion with pick when playing slowly (like a U shape movement going down, through the string, then back up), instead of the extremely small linear movements I needed to make. I only had this realization recently when I noticed that my picking technique was completely different when I picked one note really fast (which I hardly ever did because... it's nothing special). My brain and/or picking hand knew subconsciously that in order to pick that string fast, I had to make tiny movements and only in a straight back and forth line. I decided to try and apply that same picking technique in slowed down form to my minimum movement exercises for more advanced licks and tremelo picking. My left hand's minimum movement is pretty decent already because I HAVE been practicing minimum movement exercises, but I've always been discouraged from lack of solid improvement that I never gave it a lot of consistent practice. But now that I've found my mistake, I've been making rapid progress. I could have avoided ALL THIS CRAP if I had just paid for a teacher to look over my technique years ago, haha.

Also, I'm gonna need you guys to quit raining on my parade about playing faster than I can properly. I KNOW it's not good for practice, but it's not like I spend even a quarter of my practice time doing it. Like I said, I just turned super saiyan and it's not the most stable ever. Let me have my bedroom shredder glory lol I spend the vast majority of practice time focusing on minimum movement at slow tempos.
Last edited by Sample246 at Oct 7, 2014,
#13
Quote by Sample246
I've been trying for years, and using the minimum movement exercises. Problem was I didn't do it correctly for the picking hand all this time. I would use the "scooping" motion with pick when playing slowly (like a U shape movement going down, through the string, then back up), instead of the extremely small linear movements I needed to make. I only had this realization recently when I noticed that my picking technique was completely different when I picked one note really fast (which I hardly ever did because... it's nothing special). My brain and/or picking hand knew subconsciously that in order to pick that string fast, I had to make tiny movements and only in a straight back and forth line. I decided to try and apply that same picking technique in slowed down form to my minimum movement exercises for more advanced licks and tremelo picking. My left hand's minimum movement is pretty decent already because I HAVE been practicing minimum movement exercises, but I've always been discouraged from lack of solid improvement that I never gave it a lot of consistent practice. But now that I've found my mistake, I've been making rapid progress. I could have avoided ALL THIS CRAP if I had just paid for a teacher to look over my technique years ago, haha.

Also, I'm gonna need you guys to quit raining on my parade about playing faster than I can properly. I KNOW it's not good for practice, but it's not like I spend even a quarter of my practice time doing it. Like I said, I just turned super saiyan and it's not the most stable ever. Let me have my bedroom shredder glory lol I spend the vast majority of practice time focusing on minimum movement at slow tempos.


By no means am I bragging or trying to discourage you i'm just laying down some solid advice it's nice to know that you've noticed the problem which is a good thing. A lot of guitarist tend to ignore these bad habits. My question to you as of now is do you pick with your wrist?

If you don't I'd advise you to learn how to pick from your wrist it requires the most minimum movement required as all you're doing is turning or for better words flicking your wrist. If you pick from your wrist you'll have better control over everything. Then you'll really start to make some gains also another thing I wanted to ask you. Do you angle the pick when playing, and or practicing?
#14
Quote by Black_devils
By no means am I bragging or trying to discourage you i'm just laying down some solid advice it's nice to know that you've noticed the problem which is a good thing. A lot of guitarist tend to ignore these bad habits. My question to you as of now is do you pick with your wrist?

If you don't I'd advise you to learn how to pick from your wrist it requires the most minimum movement required as all you're doing is turning or for better words flicking your wrist. If you pick from your wrist you'll have better control over everything. Then you'll really start to make some gains also another thing I wanted to ask you. Do you angle the pick when playing, and or practicing?


Yeah, I've been forcing myself to use my wrist. At first, it felt odd but now it'd becoming more natural and I've noticed the improvements. I angle the pick extremely slightly.
#15
^ Ha it's 100% better right? You'll be a speed demon in no time at all! By the way I'd like to ask how your practice schedule looks if you don't mind I could lay down some tips to really get you shredding in no time at all. Also keep angling that pick don't ever forget that it might be hard right now, but the more you keep practicing it the more natural you'll be at it. Just by doing that you'll definitely get your speed up pretty fast. It's like slicing through butter the less resistance the better you'll be off.

Last edited by Black_devils at Oct 8, 2014,
#16
Quote by Black_devils
^ Ha it's 100% better right? You'll be a speed demon in no time at all! By the way I'd like to ask how your practice schedule looks if you don't mind I could lay down some tips to really get you shredding in no time at all. Also keep angling that pick don't ever forget that it might be hard right now, but the more you keep practicing it the more natural you'll be at it. Just by doing that you'll definitely get your speed up pretty fast. It's like slicing through butter the less resistance the better you'll be off.



I don't really have a schedule because I'm horrible at sticking to one. But for the past month and a half or so, I've been focusing the majority of my practice on minimal movement, playing about 3 different shred licks over and over again. I'm also working on a few Paul Gilbert exercises, using strict alternate picking on the 3 note per string scales, and trying to get down the faster picking parts of "Killing is my Business" by Megadeth. The VARIETY of stuff I'm playing isn't very big, but I'm being diligent and focusing really hard on playing slowly to minimize all movements.
#17
I ran across a vid on some syncing exercises by Steve Stine, one of which is terribly simple, yet seems to dramatically improve your ability.
All you do is simply pick as fast as you can, using both alternate and single picking. It really seems to work. In fact, all those "Absolute Fretboard Mastery" vids seem very helpful, though he tends to move a bit fast.
This may not be the correct vid in the series, but browse through them all; it can only help.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfGq2tHEbaE
Last edited by pointnplink at Oct 16, 2014,
#19
It took me 6months to get from not being able to alternate pick to be able to play at 14.666666 notes per second. i think i did a damn good job. Just want to share how i got there.
the first month all i did was play 3 notes per string alternate picking on 3 to 4 strings, then going back up then down again, man it was slow, use a metronome, didnt bother, used my foot by tapping, very helpful. the first step is sync i reckon before anything else. play really slowly. thats all i played for the first month. well not really i was practicing modes and scales offcourse.

next step that i did was speed, i wouldnt recomend it but im sharing what 'I' did so eyah i went to speed. i was playing fast the usual 3note per string shredd type thing. man it was sloppy as hell. but i was getting there, then i did some circular picking i was already good at that, i do it at the bottom 2 strings.
i did that for the last 2 months, my picking was getting faster, my other hand was alredy fast so no problem.

then i decided to challenge my self to play a hard solo, so started to learn after life. i got frustrated, i got the first bit afer hours and hours then gave up. but that fast bit at the start gave me speed at legato, and i dunno really.

so i decided to learn sweet child of mine solo. learnt it in 2 days after hours and hours. i was proud of myself. then i just continued playing the usuall 3note per string shit and circular picking watever. for the next 3 weeks. then i got back to after solo. then i got better and took me 2 weeks to learn it and play it but not properly. the end is still sloppy but the solo made me so much much better at sweeping and made me more accurate which was weird, i guess i used a metronome and played it slowly at first. still cant play the end properly so moved on. But this time, this solo expeanded my creativity i supose its like my brain just opened up. Now i started to make cool complex shredd patterns on the phrygian and minor scale. i got better sudenly fast more accurate. that is about 4 months in i think. then i had to play afterlife song for my school solo music assesment. so i learnt the whole song and practiced the solo. to my surprise i could play it almost perfectly except for the end. all is accurate and fast but i keep hiting the b string as i alternate pick, gets anoying its like a misplaced note. I got an excellence grade which is good

then i moved on again leraning another hard solos, i looked so steve vai, slash, and synystaer gates solos which i found interesting, and john petrucci. i got faster and better. now i could easily play 3 notes a string damn accurately, i look up to paul gilbert at this i do what he does sometimes play the 3 notes again before going up, sound cool, and fast. i also have been practicing 2 notes per string which was hard, but now i could play it fast and smooth, not as quick as 3 notes per string. 4 notes is easy. now im making complez patterns using other scales and modes, man it sound cool, i like the lydian mode, so mysty.

no im practicing economy picking, not sure if its worth it, it is damn hard, im also practicing sweeping combined with tapping, which is weird but it sound cool. oh and im also trying to make sweep patterns that arent the usuall arpegios, sweeping really became easy and fluent for me when i learnt afterlife, aftetr those hours of practice i supose. now im onto economy picking which i just said, and more scales. i know a lot of theory so no probs with that, ive learnt playing with soul, as my favourite guitarist is david gilmour, my style is influenced by him, i dunno what him and a shredder would be like combined, prob wont work but ill see.

well thats where i am rite now,
#20
These are really good and great suggestions. I hope this will help to improve my speed. Sure I am going to try this.
#22
I dunno didnt have a metronome I used my foot, tapping, vey slowly, not even a speed, just trying to sync my two hands together, then I just played as fast as I can wih no metronome whihc is wrong. Sloppy. I started using the metronome when I learnt afterlife, im sick of the song, yeh slowly at first about 80bpm at 16th notes, really slow, then 1month later I could play it at normal speed with 110 16h notes, he end is hard still hit the b strig ocasionaly with he circular picking.
#23
Quote by Sample246
So I've been making some serious progress in my speed development, and I want to share why this finally started happening after 6 years of only dreaming about such a thing. You see, my brain decided when I first started learning that the left hand was the star of the show. My left hand would play and my right hand would "keep up." Well recently, I decided to reverse the roles. I decided to turn my right hand into the "gas pedal" and make the left hand keep up. I knew that when I played single notes really fast, my picking technique was different than it normally was. It was tight and my thumb and forefinger didn't move, letting my wrist do the work. I didn't move far from the string after striking it before reversing direction. I always considered tremelo picking to be one of those things that I'd practice after I could already shred because it's a little gimmicky by itself. What I've learned is that it is a "gateway" to the speed picking mindset. I've been practicing this one (non tremelo picking) lick for about a month and a half, and I've gone from being stuck at 110 bpm for nearly 3 years to almost being able to play it at 140 (8th notes). What I do is "rev up the lick" by picking the first note of the lick along to the metronome (like Sonic the Hedgehog) and then letting the left hand take off. If I mess up, it won't be because my picking wasn't tight. Muscle memory for the left hand is vital for this, so repetition at very slow speeds over time is very important. When playing slow, try to make your pick move exactly like it would look if you recorded yourself playing one note really fast and slowed it down. I know when I play slow, I tend to "scoop" at the string rather than attack it in a straight back-and-forth line like you should. I am very excited because I feel like I've overcome a serious barrier to finally being able to play the kind of music I love, and I feel an obligation to share this insight in case it would help another struggling student of the speed academy.


That guy on Youtube, he does studies into the picking techniques of yngwie malstrum etc

search youtube for Troy Grady, cracking the code

edit... here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLiSyhmJaik&utm_source=troygrady.com&utm_campaign=264b3f4c41-MM_Steve_Morse_REMAILER&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6cbb965356-264b3f4c41-132527749
Last edited by wiggedy at Jun 23, 2015,
#24
Hey guys, this might be an older thread, but I just joined the forums. I've got some books out on speed picking and sweep picking, but here's some good advice in a nutshell: Think of it like weight lifting.

1. You need to have good form first, or you won't get anywhere.
2. You need to have a schedule, and keep track of your tempos, or else you won't be consistently pushing yourself.
3. Don't worry about perfection, find your edge. If you bench pressed 100 lbs perfectly for your whole life, you won't get any stronger. Adding 10 lbs on every few weeks will get you the gains, but of course you won't be able to put up the weight perfectly or easily when you first add it. Who cares? Do as many reps as possible, but push yourself. Most guitarists don't look at speed building this way, but they should.

I've got a 60 min. audio, 20 page PDF speed course available for free at the GuitarFoundry.com, it covers building speed in four areas: legato, picking, sweep picking, and tapping. It's a good resource if you use it. Good luck!
#25
Quote by GuitarFoundry

3. Don't worry about perfection, find your edge. If you bench pressed 100 lbs perfectly for your whole life, you won't get any stronger. Adding 10 lbs on every few weeks will get you the gains, but of course you won't be able to put up the weight perfectly or easily when you first add it. Who cares? Do as many reps as possible, but push yourself. Most guitarists don't look at speed building this way, but they should.


That is not how getting better at guitar works.

Weightlifting and guitar playing have very different training methods.