#1
Just a quick question, would this be all I need?

Shure SM-57
Focusrite-Scarlett 2i4 (this is what I read was the best for its price, any other recommendations?)
Amplifier
Guitar
Computer + software
Last edited by Mezo at Oct 5, 2014,
#2
Focusrite definitely makes quality recording interfaces. I actually use the 2i2 myself. Are you using the 57beta to record your guitar? Cuz if so that's unnecessary... All you have to do is line out from your amplifier or headphone jack into the interface using a premium quality guitar cable. Now however the software you use to record will make a huge difference in the end when it comes to familiarization. What software are you using to record?
#3
I agree Focusrite make good interfaces, I have used a Saffire Pro 24 and currently use a Scarlett 6i6; they're simple to use and well built.

Regarding the mic, I'd say you can use the line out/headphone out of your HT-5 (which I'm guessing you're using) but I've never been a fan of the emulated speakers on amps. A microphone will give you more control over the tone you get based on placement, or even using the fx-send on the back of the amp into a line input on your interface would give you lots of flexibility as you can use a plethora of impulses available on the net.

Again, I'd agree familiarization with software is important, although most DAWs pretty much do the same thing, it's all down to workflow. I'd say try out a few and see how you get on.
Quote by Jackolas
edgespear, driving great ideas again. Sir, you pwn.

Gear:
Guitar: Epiphone Les Paul, PRS SE Floyd Custom 24 Floyd Amethyst
Amp: Peavey 6505, Eleven Rack
#4
Quote by Mezo
Focusrite-Scarlett 2i4 (this is what I read was the best for its price, any other recommendations?)
Mackie onyx blackjack or roland duo capture EX.
Quote by nathenpetit
All you have to do is line out from your amplifier or headphone jack into the interface using a premium quality guitar cable.
That is, if the line output from your amp doesn't suck, which is never the case with guitar amps.
Also you may wanna use a cab and a mic to get the sound of both.

Anyway TS, you may wanna go from the guitar to the interface directly and use amp sims.
If I'm getting this right and the amp you'd be using is an HT5, you'll get better results with good amp sims.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
Last edited by Spambot_2 at Oct 5, 2014,
#5
What are your aims with recording?

If you just want it for something to do occasionally as an additional supplement to playing music, you may find using a standalone multitracker as your DAW better.

If you're wanting to produce a demo album for your band, you will most certainly be better off getting it done in a studio.

If you want to get into recording & spend a lot of time learning how to make the best possible product, then equipment like you're considering is a good option.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#6
Thanks for all the answers guys!

Actually I've got a marshall dsl40c now. I've always used a direct line out to record and now I really feel like I want to mic it, even if it makes no difference (I'm sure it will though) just for the learning experience. Is that a good idea? And would I need any more or any less equipment than stated?

Also I'll be using reaper, I've got some experience with it already.

Is there any reason I should be/should not be using a mic to record?
#7
Quote by Mezo
even if it makes no difference (I'm sure it will though)
Just out of curiosity, how can you say you both are sure it will make a difference and not be sure it will make a difference?

Assuming stuff you don't know much about is often misleading.

It will make a difference for sure though, yeah.
Quote by Mezo
Is that a good idea?
If you got time and space and a rig you like the sound of, yeah.
It gives you options.
Options are always good.
Quote by Mezo
And would I need any more or any less equipment than stated?
If you have the money, I'd go for an MD441 or 421, and in any case I'd go for a better interface.

The setup you described would work though.
Quote by Mezo
Is there any reason I should be/should not be using a mic to record?
It's a lot less convenient than amp sims 'cause if you're not good at doing that you'll you'll spend more time and effort for a worse sounding result.

If you're willing to put time and effort in it though it's all good.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#8
It all depends on what you are recording. If you're recording a written song and you know the sound you're after, mic it up but try to reduce how much of the amp you can hear. IE put it in another room.
If you're writing songs it makes a bit more sense to just use amp sims. If you record into a DAW and run Guitar Rig or something on the track it essentially just records a clean sound and processes it at the end of the chain so you can go back and change the sound completely afterwards if you choose. I use a a zoom R24 as interface for DAW recording but have the freedom of a standalone 24 track when I need it. I have 2 different stacks but never bother micing them up for my noodlings. A Variax, a DAW, guitar rig and away you go.

Mark
#9
I'm definitely willing to put in the time and effort, but if done correctly, it will result in a better sound than going direct, right? At least the reason I convinced myself of that is because "why would people go through the hassle of micing if it won't sound as good?!"
#10
When I've done studio recordings with bands I always mic'd up, but that was back in the day. If you have the time I would try both. Di'ing is very unforgiving, micing is fussy. It's personal choice, I wish you luck.
#11
Quote by Mezo
I'm definitely willing to put in the time and effort, but if done correctly, it will result in a better sound than going direct, right?
Only if you have a setup good enough sounding, and sounding better than amp sims takes more than a DSL40c and an SM57 if ya ask me, especially for distorted stuff.

imo, a good amp sim would sound potentially better than that for whatever distorted stuff.
Quote by Mezo
I'm definitely willing to put in the time and effort, but if done correctly, it will At least the reason I convinced myself of that is because "why would people go through the hassle of micing if it won't sound as good?!"
People do all sorts of idiotic things y' know, and a big part of people who do this don't really have a clue about what they're doing, so don't trust "people".
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#12
Everything you have on there is fine, and will make fine quality recordings. You may want to add some good monitors to your list, though. At the very least some high quality reference headphones like ATH-M50 or similar.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite