#1
For my final year I have to complete a research project and so far the title is roughly what I'll be looking at. It might need more nuance I dunno.

So I'll be looking at works that are involved with microsound and granular synthesis etc and talking about how granularity has been presented, what are the overarching themes and what do they tell us about the nature of granularity. Then finally I'll be creating my own installation to provide a novel method of interaction with granular ideas.

As of this moment the main basis for this is to have the audience interact with a box of sand and then using a camera and Max have the resulting structures create meaningful processes in sound and visuals. Sand is perhaps the most obvious place in which the granularity of structures are apparent and provides an opportunity for the audience to consider the nature of granularity.

This idea of considering what we traditionally think of as continuous in granular terms challenges many things but sticking with music it might raise the question, what is analog sound? We think of continuous waveforms and say "This is analog sound" but of course we experience sound through the air, through the excitement of a granular system. Surely we do not experience sound as waveform drawings so really, does analog sound exist? Are there any sound structures which are continuous? Is there a hierarchy between analog and digital sound? Is there even a distinction to be made when it comes to experience?

What are your thoughts about my project?
#5
Quote by willT08
Is there even a distinction to be made when it comes to experience?

What are your thoughts about my project?


I haven't put much thought into it but I came to the conclusion a while ago that the answer to this is no. Seems like an artificial divide to me.

I will admit that this is one aspect of music that I've always struggled to grasp.
#6
well if you're looking at individual data then I would look into random generation - vibrating or shifting plates. Look up what Ryoji Ikeda has done with his installations for inspiration. maybe visual representation of such, too?

For micro sound, turn to people like Steve Roden: he used the manipulated sounds of handling paper. Each sheet could be counted as such, or each movement, perhaps?
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#7
What's your angle with this? You studying art, music, ...?
Even digital transmission (of music, voice, TV ...) is carried over a continuous medium. You'd have to get down to the atomic level of observation and then you're in trouble (quantum ....). Good luck!
#8
Ryoji is a definite influence on all this

Never heard of Steve Roden before so I will look him up. Microsound makes me think Roads, Roads, Roads.

And jez I study music tech. I'm not sure which continuous medium you mean.
#9
Quote by willT08
Ryoji is a definite influence on all this

Never heard of Steve Roden before so I will look him up. Microsound makes me think Roads, Roads, Roads.

And jez I study music tech. I'm not sure which continuous medium you mean.


Now music tech is a good thing to study!! By continuous medium, I meant our dear old analogue radio waves and sound waves.

Your thread reminds of a "rockOmeter" someone built at work. It was a small area with pressure pads in the floor, and audience were given hats with accelerometers in them. As different music was played, the amount of pressure on the floor (dancing) and the accelerations in the hats (head banging) were continuously measured, in response to different styles of music. Obviously tongue in cheek, but fun.
#10
Quote by willT08
Are there any sound structures which are continuous?


We can never hear nothing.

Didn't know about Steve Roden. Good stuff.
#11
Quote by MapOfYourHead
We can never hear nothing.

Didn't know about Steve Roden. Good stuff.

I mean continuous in structure, not as in constantly happening. although i should probably think more about what constantly happening means. I should have thought about radio waves, need to consider them more. i'd been thinking about light but hadn't got there

as for steve roden. it's not microsound as i think roads would have it. it does however have all these similar ideas as in the glitch movement, hence Kim Cascone coming up in Lowercase's wiki i guess
#12
Quote by willT08
I mean continuous in structure, not as in constantly happening. although i should probably think more about what constantly happening means. I should have thought about radio waves, need to consider them more. i'd been thinking about light but hadn't got there

as for steve roden. it's not microsound as i think roads would have it. it does however have all these similar ideas as in the glitch movement, hence Kim Cascone coming up in Lowercase's wiki i guess


Yea, I mean, its obviously a good question and we've been trying to answer it at least since Democratis.

But, given the choice between waves and particles, I chose that waves are the "continuous" form.