#1
I sprayed my guitar body with a can of duplicolor acrylic lacquer.
It's been hanging in the basement for 3 weeks, and still scratches real easy.
Is there a way to speed it up?
#4
I never have a problem with the Duplicolor cure time, but I live in a very warm area
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#5
Lacquer doesn't "cure." It dries.

The distinction is important, in that it needs the solvents to flash off before it can solidify.
The number of coats, how they were applied and the environmental conditions when it was sprayed (and in your basement) all make a difference. Put it somewhere warm and dry. If it doesn't harden up in three weeks, strip it and start over.
#6
Quote by Invader Jim
With some types of lacquer (don't remember which kinds) you can shine UV lights on it to speed up the curing, but otherwise it can take a few months to fully cure.


Unlikely to find UV catalyzed lacquers. OTHER kinds of non-lacquer paint, yes.
#7
Would blowing a fan on it help?
Or bring it upstairs where its slightly warmer?
#9
Quote by Explorerbuilder
With lacquer, temperature and airflow dont really affect the way it dries. Since it has to gas off to dry, it just has to happen naturally.


Since the drying of these lacquers depends on evaporation of a solvent, I would have said that anything which aids evaporation, including ventilation and heat, would help speed up the process. - This relates to one of my professional interests - water loss from crops, which is a similar process.
#10
Quote by Tony Done
Since the drying of these lacquers depends on evaporation of a solvent, I would have said that anything which aids evaporation, including ventilation and heat, would help speed up the process. - This relates to one of my professional interests - water loss from crops, which is a similar process.

It seems like it, but it still isnt true. Heat or temperature doenst speed up or slow down the process unless you get over 100*, then it is still just barley noticeable.
#11
Quote by xocarek
I sprayed my guitar body with a can of duplicolor acrylic lacquer.
It's been hanging in the basement for 3 weeks, and still scratches real easy.
Is there a way to speed it up?


Depends how you applied it. If you did lots of very very thin coats and waited well past the manufacturers minimum drying time between each then it should dry hard in less time. Although i'd still wait about a month. However as its still really soft after 3 weeks it doesn't sound like you applied it this way.

If you did thicker coats it will take a lot longer. In the order of months.

If you did small number of really thick coats it will be soft for ages and possibly never really harden because the bottom layers will not have been able to gas off at the same rate as the surface layers which will harden faster and seal off the bottom layers from gassing effectively. I'd strip this and do it again if you did it this way.
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Last edited by Phoenix V at Oct 12, 2014,