#1
Hello, I'm currently new at guitars, I've been using my FX370C Yamaha for about 4 days now. I've been looking tutorials using it allday for chords and such. Though I have 1 question that I'm not sure if it's serious problem that I should stop.

One of the chords that I use to practice is D major. Looking at the tab, swap the 1 and the 2 finger positions, I pretty much do that instead, being used to it.

Is this a bad habit I should stop now? Or just stay with it, not a big deal do whatever is comfortable for me?

-Jon
#2
I think it's probably better to switch it how it is in the tab. But, I find there's an even better way. Barre the one and 2 positions with index, and then play other with second finger. You can even add one more note, like the whole top part of Bm7, and you could add on that D root on A string as well.

I find all of those options are good at different times.
#3
Start by doing the chord the traditional "right way"( open D, index(A note),ring finger (D note) and middle finger (F#note) in that order) . The reason you want to do it like that is that it leaves your pinky and index fingers some freedom to catch other notes ( this becomes useful with fills etc.). It also makes pulling of to the open high E string easier. It's also an easy voicing to move around, which you'll find happens in some tunes. It's the default voicing for a reason - it's efficient and lends itself well to chord changes.

Then practice the partial bar method as mentioned above, which is useful for adding other notes, but is really a more advanced voicing that should be focused on later. You don't want your default D voicing to be a partial bar - it'll slow you down for tunes that jump from chord to chord quickly and it's rare that people would use that for a D chord, unless there is some specific reason to do so ( like certain fills or bass lines).
Last edited by reverb66 at Oct 7, 2014,
#4
Quote by reverb66


You don't want your default D voicing to be a partial bar - it'll slow you down for tunes that jump from chord to chord quickly
I disagree. its just as easy as any other barre chord or any chord. you have to practice enough to be fast, in any voicing you choose. some voicings are more flexible, and can hold advantages for when you get better. I personally wish I would used that one from the get go. If I did, I'm not sure I would ever use the classic grip. I'd have to think it through. There are times though, when I'm playing, that I use the classic grip, and wish I hadn't, because it is limiting.

I find that there are 2 main approaches for non classical guitar. There is the more blues style, with the thumb more wrapped underneath. This is more common of a style, especially for electric guitar, and guitar with distortion.

Another main method, I call the barre technique, which is much more barre chord based. More barre sort of shapes. Jimi hendrix used a hybrid of these. Joe Pass was more of a barre kind of guy. With a clean tone, you can play thicker chords. If you will play just rhythm guitar with distortion you will want more clean basic chords. If you want to play more free and dance around more, playing with chords, not just single tones in a solo, then I find the barre technique far superior. It's a very powerful way to play. But most guitarists don't take advantage of that, and don't really play a style that lends itself well to that barre technique. You probably won't play an A7#5b9 in a metal band.

The barre system uses a thumb pressed to the middle of the back of the neck more, whereas the bluesy style wraps the thumb more. Switching between these can be a bit slow.


it's rare that people would use that for a D chord.


This is true, but it's an easier, more flexible grip I find. As always, it depends what style you play.
#5
Quote by fingrpikingood
I disagree. its just as easy as any other barre chord or any chord. you have to practice enough to be fast, in any voicing you choose. some voicings are more flexible, and can hold advantages for when you get better. I personally wish I would used that one from the get go. If I did, I'm not sure I would ever use the classic grip. I'd have to think it through. There are times though, when I'm playing, that I use the classic grip, and wish I hadn't, because it is limiting.

I find that there are 2 main approaches for non classical guitar. There is the more blues style, with the thumb more wrapped underneath. This is more common of a style, especially for electric guitar, and guitar with distortion.

Another main method, I call the barre technique, which is much more barre chord based. More barre sort of shapes. Jimi hendrix used a hybrid of these. Joe Pass was more of a barre kind of guy. With a clean tone, you can play thicker chords. If you will play just rhythm guitar with distortion you will want more clean basic chords. If you want to play more free and dance around more, playing with chords, not just single tones in a solo, then I find the barre technique far superior. It's a very powerful way to play. But most guitarists don't take advantage of that, and don't really play a style that lends itself well to that barre technique. You probably won't play an A7#5b9 in a metal band.

The barre system uses a thumb pressed to the middle of the back of the neck more, whereas the bluesy style wraps the thumb more. Switching between these can be a bit slow.


This is true, but it's an easier, more flexible grip I find. As always, it depends what style you play.


I completely agree that the partial bar technique is useful, especially for chords other than D major, and for more advanced styles, like Hendrix, Classical, jazz etc. I play classical, Hendrix tunes a plenty, and some jazz, folk, bluegrass etc, so I'm not unfamiliar with what you're talking about here.

The point is that if you're a beginner playing basic chords - the basic D shape needs to be learnt because it's the easiest and most efficient way of voicing a D on the guitar. Bar chords are not efficient for jumping from chord to chord on a traditional acoustic guitar repertoire, which tends to lean heavily on open chord voicings, because they are easier and sound better and most strumming tunes were written that way.

I'm all for people expanding their chord voicings, but to suggest to a beginner to do a D major with a partial bar without mastering the traditional approach, used by essentially everyone, is simply not solid advice. Got a call a spade a spade here.
#7
Quote by reverb66
I completely agree that the partial bar technique is useful, especially for chords other than D major, and for more advanced styles, like Hendrix, Classical, jazz etc. I play classical, Hendrix tunes a plenty, and some jazz, folk, bluegrass etc, so I'm not unfamiliar with what you're talking about here.

The point is that if you're a beginner playing basic chords - the basic D shape needs to be learnt because it's the easiest and most efficient way of voicing a D on the guitar. Bar chords are not efficient for jumping from chord to chord on a traditional acoustic guitar repertoire, which tends to lean heavily on open chord voicings, because they are easier and sound better and most strumming tunes were written that way.

I'm all for people expanding their chord voicings, but to suggest to a beginner to do a D major with a partial bar without mastering the traditional approach, used by essentially everyone, is simply not solid advice. Got a call a spade a spade here.


Not saying he should.

I didn't learn that first, but I'm not convinced it wouldn't be a good habit to start with. I think the only time I really find the traditional way superior is if I want to add a note on the low E with my thumb. Actually that's not true. I don't think I can think of any time the traditional D grip is objectively better. But maybe there are cases I would come across while I was playing.

I think I would prefer to have learned the barre way first and foremost, and have had that my default. Sometimes I find myself playing and I went to the standard grip, and I get annoyed because it makes me kind of stuck. Every guitarist is different and has to choose their own path. Planning for the future, lets you be more efficient.

So, again, not saying he should learn that first. Just letting him know it exists, and I find it a superior grip. I don't really see the downsides about it you're talking about though. It's the easiest and most efficient and most versatile. But that's me. Other people can do whatever they want I won't try to get them to do anything. I can only speak about my own experience, and what I learned for myself.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Oct 7, 2014,