#1
This basically hit me when I swapped out a set of 9's in my LP for a set of flatwound 11's and I started playing a bit better, and it felt easier, although the strings were heavier. I always found 9's to be a bit "wobbly", if you will. Am I a bit heavy handed (I did play acoustic for a year before buying my electric, almost solely with 12's...), or is there something I'm missing? Just some thoughts to discuss...
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#2
Not that uncommon. The idea that thinner strings are easier to play is an oversimplification.
#3
Yup. Nice tones, better sustain, makes bending harder (in a good way), and makes popping/heavy dynamics much better. And drones.
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#4
D'Addario 52-10 (their version of the Skinny Top Heavy Bottoms). I really like beefy strings on the bass side for rhythm oriented strumming. The top side not so much for delicate individual string picking.
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#5
I think 10s will be the highest I will ever play in standard tuning.

I just really hate 3 semitone bends on the high E string. I just feel the string pyshing back onto me, and I really feel like it'll snap.

So yeah, 9s for me. 10s if I tune down.
#7
Anyone else notice how light strings pull up with your fingers and subsequently ring if you're doing very fast chord changes? Drives me mad...
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#8
I love thick strings. Couldnt stand anything smaller than a 54 for my 6th when I used to own a 6 in drop A#, now I use a 74 for my low F#. I'd prefer to go 80, but can't find them anywhere

Currently, going 10/13/17/30/42/54/64/74 in F#BEADGBE.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 7, 2014,
#9
Quote by TheStig1214
D'Addario 52-10 (their version of the Skinny Top Heavy Bottoms). I really like beefy strings on the bass side for rhythm oriented strumming. The top side not so much for delicate individual string picking.


This exactly. Love the Skinny top Heavy Bottom gauges. I play in D Standard, and used EB 52-10s for years, used the Cobalt version for a while, just recently switched back to the DR Dimebag Sig set, which is 52-10 and what I used for a bit way back before switching to the EBs. Now I don't know why I ever switched, because I LOVE the sound and feel of the DR Dimebags.
#10
10-52 needs to be the new 10-46. It's the best compromise of having a thick tone on the lower strings, and still being able to easily bend notes on the higher strings.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 7, 2014,
#12
I use 9-42 on 10 out of 13 electrics, exceptions are Esp Eclipse, and two Gibson Les Pauls.

Owning many guitars and playing for a couple of years I have learned to recognize things that come in phases. String gauges are definitely one of those. Sometimes I think I should go for 9's on everything and sometimes I feel 10's are just perfect on my Les Paul. I will probably try 9's sooner of later, but really, string gauges isn't something that feel the same all the time. It is all about what you are used to at a particular time.

My reason for using 9-42 is that they're a common gauge I can easily buy in boxes of 10 sets even here in Sweden, they are the easiest on my fingers - which is always a good thing and something that is often overlooked, playing can lead to serious injuries and I do not want to put in more stress than necessary - while I don't often suffer breakages.

Done, I do not put more thought into it than that.
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#13
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
10-52 needs to be the new 10-46. It's the best compromise of having a thick tone on the lower strings, and still being able to easily bend notes on the higher strings.


Indeed. I use them for D Standard and sometimes drop C tuning, and I love that the low strings still feel very chunky and not floppy at all. The other guitarist in my band uses 10-52 now, as well, and he plays E Standard. Just loves that chunk.
#14
I use a 13-56/58 set. Which ever I want at the time.

I definitely prefer bigger gauges
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#16
I play Ernie Ball 52-11s. That being said, my guitar is usually tuned to either D or dropC. I use 50-10 or 48-10 (i think) for standard and half step down. Its much better, since you can really dig into the strings. I guess the 46-9 are good for beginers, since you dont have the strenght to play yet, but other than that, thicker strings are better in every way.
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#17
I've always played .009-.042 strings, but since I have a custom superstrat being built exclusively for drop-C tuning, I'm going to throw a .011-.056 set on it.

I'm really looking forward to see how it feels such a drastic difference in string gauge.
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#18
My picking hand likes tight strings but my fretting hand does not. Now, I have strong hands and all but with tight strings I find myself squeezing the strings too hard. However my picking hand likes the tight strings, they just feel so much more responsive.

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#19
Quote by MaaZeus
My picking hand likes tight strings but my fretting hand does not. Now, I have strong hands and all but with tight strings I find myself squeezing the strings too hard. However my picking hand likes the tight strings, they just feel so much more responsive.

I have this problem too.

With heavier strings I really dig into the fret wire when bending, which eventually results in little notches being carved out under the strings too quickly.

I have tried to train myself to play a bit more delicately using 8-38 gauge, and it seemed to work until I started using 11-52s again.

I much prefer the way heavier strings respond - the extra tension makes them sound a lot more punchy, to me - particularly the wound strings. I've been using 10-46 gauge for the last year or so and that has helped to keep the fretwire from getting torn up so quickly. I might try some 10-52s, since it was bending the unwound strings from heavier sets that was eating up my fretwire, and it's the wound strings in lighter gauges that i think suffer the most tonally.
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#20
Quote by MaaZeus
My picking hand likes tight strings but my fretting hand does not. Now, I have strong hands and all but with tight strings I find myself squeezing the strings too hard. However my picking hand likes the tight strings, they just feel so much more responsive.


This. Although for me, both my hands like the heavy strings.
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Dunlop Stubby 3.0mm picks
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#21
I use 9-42 on my PRS, 10-46 on my LP/G&L,tele and 10-52 on my G-400

I actually like the 10-52 alot tuned to E standard, it suprised me.
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