#1
Okay so I just got my Onyx Blackjack and I'm having troubles setting it up correctly.
I'm using it to record guitar by the way, connected with a cable into the interface.

When connected my guitar directly to the Blackjack, it sounds... nice. It could be better. Also, I think there's a slight hum in the background while playing. Doesn't bother me too much though.

When I'm connecting guitar > pedals > Blackjack it sounds.. worse. The clean sound is a little worse than before (even though the clean sound is way better with my pedals, rather than without, when playing through an amp). And when I use my overdrive it sounds completely horrible. It sounds like I'm playing a classical guitar using a $20 amp on the overdrive channel.

Also, I asked a question a couple of weeks ago here on the forum if the following chain could be used:
Guitar > Pedals > Amp > Preamp out > Timebased pedals > Blackjack.
The answer was yes, but it does not work for me. My amp is acting as if the FX loop isn't in use (understandable. But I was expecting it to not make any sounds at all.) and the Blackjack receives no signal.

So what I'm really asking for is:

1. Can the sound the Blackjack produces be altered to fit my liking more?

2. How do I get my pedals to properly function?

3. If it's possible to use my amps FX loop together with the Blackjack, I'd love to get the answer to this aswell.

Thanks!
Last edited by Visual382 at Oct 8, 2014,
#2
1. yeah but you don't have to do anything about the interface, you gotta read the amp sims sticky.
What you're hearing is the raw sound of your guitar, which can be nice and can also be not, so if you want to sound like you're playing through an amp you're gonna need some amp simulation software.

2. they are functioning properly, your problem still comes from the fact that you're missing the amp simulation part, which avoids distortions to sound that fizzy and so on.

3. It should be possible, yeah.
What amp do you have and how are you connecting everything.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
I see. So if I use Guitar Rig 5 for example, all those problems are solved? Sweet.

Here is my full chain:

Guitar (Taylor T5) > Polytune > Whammy DT > Empress Compressor > Pollyanna Octave > Klone V2 > NS-2 > Amp input > Preamp out > Timefactor > RC-300 > power amp in.

The amp is a Hot Rod Deville 212.
#5
Yes, guitar rig would work.

Anyway if I was you I would skip the pedals thatt are easily replacable with software (compressor, looper, nioise gate and so on) and stick to the simulations - apart from most sooftware being bettter than most guitar pedals, amp sims don't take pedals really well usually.

Also guitar rig isn't much good for anything that's not mostly clean, so look at other stuff as well if mostly clean stuff is not what you're after.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#6
Unless any of them are particularly rare or they are expression pedals. You'll have better luck running directly into the interface and not using them.
#7
I kind of need all my pedals though. Except my compressor and overdrive, I guess.

Is it a better idea to mic up my amp instead of plugging my guitar directly to the interface then?
#8
Quote by Visual382
I kind of need all my pedals though.
Pedals do stuff that can be done better by software most of the times.

The klon isn't the case, but everything else is.
Find a software compressor, tuner, pitch shifter, noise gate and/or noise suppressor, delay and if you want also other stuff.
Quote by Visual382
Is it a better idea to mic up my amp instead of plugging my guitar directly to the interface then?
Not at this level.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
Quote by Spambot_2
Pedals do stuff that can be done better by software most of the times.

The klon isn't the case, but everything else is.
Find a software compressor, tuner, pitch shifter, noise gate and/or noise suppressor, delay and if you want also other stuff.
Not at this level.

Screw off, of course it's a good idea to mic his amp. It's a skill any amateur recording engineer should be practicing. He should determine FOR HIMSELF if it sounds good or not, not take someone's word for it online.

It's a Fender amp with light OD and heavy modulation - it will sound WAY better through a 57 into a blackjack than DI'ed trying to replicate those sounds.

This forum gives me ulcers.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#10
Quote by Sid McCall
Screw off, of course it's a good idea to mic his amp. It's a skill any amateur recording engineer should be practicing.
'cause it's cool?
'cause I don't see any other reason here.

Mic'ing up an amp takes time, space, possibly a good sounding room, and in this case also a good mic and a mic stand.

It's also harder to make it sound good, and you have a lot less control on the result.

Also with that setup, one could argue it won't sound better than a good amp sim until to the point where TS gets a different (read - more expensive) mic and a good sounding room if he also likes himself an acceptable reverb.

Mic'ing up amps is better if you have equipment and facilities good enough to make it sound better.
This doesn't seem the case to me.
Quote by Sid McCall
This forum gives me ulcers.
Yeah, I also can't stand people saying 2i2's sound fine
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#11
Quote by Spambot_2
Pedals do stuff that can be done better by software most of the times.

The klon isn't the case, but everything else is.
Find a software compressor, tuner, pitch shifter, noise gate and/or noise suppressor, delay and if you want also other stuff.


Sounds hard to use a whammy effect with software while playing. Also, I want to loop, not just record tracks individually. But I'm guessing that is impossible without using a mic to the amp anyway since there's latency when listening live through the interface.

Also, mic'ing up the amp would be trouble to me since I'm having this horrible static from the amp, which I have no clue why. I'm guessing there's something wrong with the electrics in the building.

I get static when using a lot of overdrive with the guitar rig 5 aswell. I'm guessing that's because of the high gain and my guitar though.
Last edited by Visual382 at Oct 10, 2014,
#12
Quote by Visual382
Sounds hard to use a whammy effect with software while playing. Also, I want to loop, not just record tracks individually.
I'm getting that you're using your computer instead of your amp 'cause you wanna record stuff, and if you're gonna record stuff you wanna record everything separately to get the max precision.

Loopers overlapping tracks are to avoid when recording.
Live changes in fx parameters are to avoid unless they're not reproducible later.

Why?
'cause in the first case you're not gonna be right on time, so you'll have to record (or program virtual instruments) following that track, which isn't ideal 'cause your timing will also likely change, and in the second case you can fix an error without re-recording a 5min track.
Quote by Visual382
But I'm guessing that is impossible without using a mic to the amp anyway since there's latency when listening live through the interface.
Have you tried lowering your audio buffer size?
That reduces latency, for both the input and the output.
Quote by Visual382
Also, mic'ing up the amp would be trouble to me since I'm having this horrible static from the amp, which I have no clue why. I'm guessing there's something wrong with the electrics in the building.
Is your guitar grounded?
What kinda cables are you using?
Is it still there when you turn the pre gain fairly low?
Quote by Visual382
I get static when using a lot of overdrive with the guitar rig 5 aswell. I'm guessing that's because of the high gain and my guitar though.
Again, 'cause amp sims don't take pedals well and guitar rig isn't much good for anything that's mostly clean.

And you could try and use a noise gate and/or a noise suppressor.

You sure you read the amp sims sticky?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
Last edited by Spambot_2 at Oct 10, 2014,
#13
Quote by Spambot_2
Have you tried lowering your audio buffer size?
That reduces latency, for both the input and the output.


I lowered it, and it's close no latency now. Thanks!

Quote by Spambot_2
Is your guitar grounded?
What kinda cables are you using?


I.. guess so? Some pickups give more buzz than others. (3rd and 5th position on the T5)
Sorry for being unskilled, as usual, hah.

I've heard that I have good cables. Klotz as patch cables and Fender cables for the rest.

Quote by Spambot_2
Is it still there when you turn the pre gain fairly low?


The noise increases the more gain I have, which is understandable. But even when I run my guitar straight to the amp, with no pedals between, I get the buzz.

Quote by Spambot_2
Again, 'cause amp sims don't take pedals well and guitar rig isn't much good for anything that's mostly clean.


I mean without pedals. Just the overdrive the amp sims create. I'll try other amp sims for overdrive.


Quote by Spambot_2
You sure you read the amp sims sticky?


Not.. all of it. Busted.
#14
Quote by Visual382
I.. guess so? Some pickups give more buzz than others. (3rd and 5th position on the T5)
Sorry for being unskilled, as usual, hah.
Well we all gotta learn somewhere.

So, check for yourself if the thing is grounded.
Does the noise reduce when you're touching one of the metallic parts on the guitar (bridge, strings...)?
Quote by Visual382
I've heard that I have good cables. Klotz as patch cables and Fender cables for the rest.
Well fender's nice, klotz not much, though if you're hearing that noise even when you're going from guitar to amp then you're probably right about the problem being partially caused by the power line.

Then again though, the HDR isn't known for being particularly low noise...
Quote by Visual382
I mean without pedals. Just the overdrive the amp sims create.
Then you know half of the reason why I don't like guitar rig for mid to high gain sounds.

When using a distorted amp sim you also may wanna try and put the noise gate right at the beginning of your chain, and then possibly one right after the amp.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#15
Quote by Spambot_2
'cause it's cool?
'cause I don't see any other reason here.

Mic'ing up an amp takes time, space, possibly a good sounding room, and in this case also a good mic and a mic stand.

It's also harder to make it sound good, and you have a lot less control on the result.

Also with that setup, one could argue it won't sound better than a good amp sim until to the point where TS gets a different (read - more expensive) mic and a good sounding room if he also likes himself an acceptable reverb.

Mic'ing up amps is better if you have equipment and facilities good enough to make it sound better.
This doesn't seem the case to me.
Yeah, I also can't stand people saying 2i2's sound fine

I don't know anything about cool vs not cool. I also don't know why everyone hates the idea of spending time learning a real life skill in the studio. I have used sims extensively, and NONE of them sound half as good as my amp with a mic on it.

I have recorded my amp with a $100 sm57 in an untreated brooklyn living room, and it sounded better than any sims I've ever used. I've recorded the same amp with the same mic in my fully treated home studio in Nashville, and it sounds better but not a whole heck of a lot.

Mic'ing an amp is NOT rocket science. Grab a 57, stick it like 14" from the grill just within the edge of the cone. Boom. You're anywhere from 100% to 80% of the way there.

I don't know, maybe it's different with heavy metal, but even then I can't see how it's too different from my clean amp. All I know is: you are not going to get accurate spring reverb drip from an emulator, only from sticking a mic on an amp.

If people around here spent half the time they spend trying to learn how to master their tracks (don't get me started...seriously, pay somebody else) learning how to place mics on their amps, they'd be fine. I swear half of you guys do it because you don't want to pay for anything and it's cheaper to download a free simulator than it is to buy a $100 microphone and plug it into your interface.

On that note, I will be making some sound clips tonight for all of you to determine whether or not simulators sound as good as my mic'ed amp.

Also, specific to this topic: the TS has a damn Klon, he can afford an SM57 and spend all of two hours learning how to place it against his amp and record it and see how it sounds. Dear TS: please go to a local store and buy a mic and stick it against your amp and see what happens. If it sucks, return it.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
Last edited by Sid McCall at Oct 10, 2014,
#16
Quote by Sid McCall
I have used sims extensively, and NONE of them sound half as good as my amp with a mic on it.
Just out of curiosity and on a totally unrelated note, what have you used exactly?
Quote by Sid McCall
Grab a 57, stick it like 14" from the grill just within the edge of the cone. Boom. You're anywhere from 100% to 80% of the way there.
Damn all these engineers spending all that time placing different mic's in different places really must do that 'cause they don't have anything better to do.
Quote by Sid McCall
All I know is: you are not going to get accurate spring reverb drip from an emulator, only from sticking a mic on an amp.
Second question, same as the first: what have you used exactly?
Quote by Sid McCall
I swear half of you guys do it because you don't want to pay for anything and it's cheaper to download a free simulator than it is to buy a $100 microphone and plug it into your interface.
I myself do it because it's hella more convenient and it doesn't sound better enough.
Most of the times it doesn't sound better at all for what I do.
Quote by Sid McCall
On that note, I will be making some sound clips tonight for all of you to determine whether or not simulators sound as good as my mic'ed amp.
While good or bad is much subjective, please do that, and I'll be more than happy to play stuff with amp sims and post everything here for comparison.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#17
Amp sims can be good, but I think most people will agree that a real amp always sounds better. This is coming from the guy who wrote the damn sticky, I've used the majority of amp sims available.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#18
Amp sim vs real amp debate again?

Amp sims can be great, so can real amps.

Personally, for me, I prefer to mic amps. I think it sounds better, and it's more fun for me.

TS, do what you want. Both ways are valid. If you do go the micing way, do what Sid said and get a 57. Play around with some different positions and see what you get.
#19
Quote by Spambot_2
Just out of curiosity and on a totally unrelated note, what have you used exactly?
Damn all these engineers spending all that time placing different mic's in different places really must do that 'cause they don't have anything better to do.
Second question, same as the first: what have you used exactly?
I myself do it because it's hella more convenient and it doesn't sound better enough.
Most of the times it doesn't sound better at all for what I do.
While good or bad is much subjective, please do that, and I'll be more than happy to play stuff with amp sims and post everything here for comparison.

I've used amplitube, waves GTR, and ableton's built-in stuff. Amplitube was the best, and I continue to use Ableton's cab impulses on my bass guitar for every track I record. Cab impulses are amazing for electric bass, especially with an outboard pre-amp.

For a long time, I used amplitube's princeton patch (custom edited) for my demos. It doesn't sound as good as my real princeton, but it sounded close enough for my tiny apartment where I couldn't mic at all times of day. In my new home studio, I have a permanent 57 hooked up to my interface and parked in front of my amp. It's actually faster to open a new audio track set to input 2 and boom, there's my guitar. I understand that not everyone has 'luxuries' like this, but it's not too far-fetched.

Engineers can and should places tons of mics on everything. I'm just saying that an ultra-basic approach to mic'ing will yield favorable results nine times out of ten - especially on a fender amp with low gain and heavy modulation.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#20
Quote by ChemicalFire
Amp sims can be good, but I think most people will agree that a real amp always sounds better. This is coming from the guy who wrote the damn sticky, I've used the majority of amp sims available.

Thank you!
Quote by chaosmoon
Amp sim vs real amp debate again?

Amp sims can be great, so can real amps.

Personally, for me, I prefer to mic amps. I think it sounds better, and it's more fun for me.

TS, do what you want. Both ways are valid. If you do go the micing way, do what Sid said and get a 57. Play around with some different positions and see what you get.

I agree both have their place. That's why I hate when someone comes around here and answers a 'should I try mic'ing?' question with 'no that's a waste of time don't bother'

My studio philosophy is to try EVERYTHING once. Try that mic once, try that plugin once, try the drummer's terrible harmony vocal idea once. Try it all once, or you're not being fair to your music, your bandmates, your clients, or yourself.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#21
Quote by Spambot_2
So, check for yourself if the thing is grounded.
Does the noise reduce when you're touching one of the metallic parts on the guitar (bridge, strings...)?


Okay, so I tried this with the Blackjack and Guitar Rig 5. Can not try with the amp at the moment.

I heard that I have two different noises. One of them, however, might be caused by the overdrive of Guitar Rig 5, once again.

When using pickup position 1 (Neck humbucker and body sensor), position 2 (Neck humbucker only), and position 4 (Neck and bridge humbuckers in parallel), Only one of the noise is heard.

But when using position 3 (Bridge humbucker) and position 5 (Neck and bridge in series) I get this second, added noise. Which, as you mentioned, disappear when I touch the bridge pickup.


Also, I'm actually thinking of getting a vocal mic, but it would be good if I could use it to mic my amp as well and I heard that the SM57 is good for vocals too. Is this true?
Last edited by Visual382 at Oct 10, 2014,
#22
Quote by Visual382
Okay, so I tried this with the Blackjack and Guitar Rig 5. Can not try with the amp at the moment.

I heard that I have two different noises. One of them, however, might be caused by the overdrive of Guitar Rig 5, once again.

When using pickup position 1 (Neck humbucker and body sensor), position 2 (Neck humbucker only), and position 4 (Neck and bridge humbuckers in parallel), Only one of the noise is heard.

But when using position 3 (Bridge humbucker) and position 5 (Neck and bridge in series) I get this second, added noise. Which, as you mentioned, disappear when I touch the bridge pickup.


Also, I'm actually thinking of getting a vocal mic, but it would be good if I could use it to mic my amp as well and I heard that the SM57 is good for vocals too. Is this true?

Good for live vocals, not so good for 'keeper' studio vocals. I run scratch vocals with mine all the time, though. People will disagree, like always, but I'd recommend against it.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#23
Didn't read the thread past the first few posts cause I'm really confused on one thing in particular, and why people are suggesting you don't do it:

1. Why aren't you just micing your amp?

You have perfectly good gear, many of which are ONLY going to respond correctly when plugged into a real amplifier. Why you're being told to just replicate this sound with a software amp is completely baffling to me

You're already completely bypassing any advantages you get from not micing the amp, by using your pedals in the DI chain, so it makes literally no sense to not just put a mic in front of it, instead.

1. Unless you're wanting to mic your amp with a condenser, or at very low volumes, the room actually doesn't come into play much at all.

2. A GLS ES57 costs $30, a small stand for micing a cab can be as low as $10 and a 5ft XLR cable will cost you $20 or less, depending on how high end you want to go. Not a very significant investment, especially considering the money you've spent in your pedalboard and amp. Even if you want the real deal - the Shure SM57 isn't that expensive and is a mic that professionals use every day.

3. If you've got a foot of space in front of your amp, you have enough room to mic it.

4. Micing an amp really isn't that hard. Put on a pair of headphones, blast some power chords and move the mic around until it sounds good. With a good amp, like you have, it would actually be pretty difficult to get a bad sound of it.

*sigh*
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#24
Quote by MatrixClaw
Why you're being told to just replicate this sound with a software amp is completely baffling to me
That's because you didn't play with the good software.
Quote by MatrixClaw
1. Unless you're wanting to mic your amp with a condenser or at very low volumes or you want a natural sounding reverb in your recording, the room actually doesn't come into play much at all.
FTFY.
Quote by MatrixClaw
the Shure SM57 isn't that expensive and is a mic that professionals use every day.
To do other stuff, mostly.

I mean they use them 57's a lot, but they rarely use 57's to mic up mostly clean sounding amp's in recording studios.

Though TS if you decide you wanna go down that route, the SM57 is definitely the most versatile mic you can find for that and up to 5 times the money.

To everybody else, my point is that mic'd amp's can sound better indeed, but it's not like every amp mic'd up with whatever mic will sound better than every amp sim, and this is one of these cases in which the bigger setup won't sound better imo.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#25
Thanks for the answer Luca. I'll probably use both mic'd and amp sims depending on the situation, when I decide to get a SM57.

Could you figure out the solution regarding the buzz, judging from my latest post, Luca?
#26
Quote by Spambot_2
I mean they use them 57's a lot, but they rarely use 57's to mic up mostly clean sounding amp's in recording studios.

Spoken like someone who has not spent much time in actual recording studios. I'm not trying to be rude, or get off topic, but you just plain have zero idea what you're talking about at this point.

The only thing studios use 57s for more frequently than amps would be snares. Obviously there are tons more amp mics that can be used (e609, md421, etc) but the 57 is right there in thousands of professional studios on tons of amps, ESPECIALLY clean ones.

Source: I work in the music industry in Nashville, TN. What do you do for a living that gives you such valuable insight as found in the above quote?
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#27
Quote by Sid McCall

The only thing studios use 57s for more frequently than amps would be snares. Obviously there are tons more amp mics that can be used (e609, md421, etc) but the 57 is right there in thousands of professional studios on tons of amps, ESPECIALLY clean ones.


Not trying to start a big thing here, but I can attest to that. I interned at Blackbird, and 57s and 121s were used on like 75% of guitar recordings.
#28
Quote by Spambot_2
That's because you didn't play with the good software.

I own every commercial amp simulator on the market, as well as most of the high end effects packages, and have owned the Axe-FX Standard, Axe-FX Ultra, Axe-FX II and Kemper. Pretty sure I've played with good software

Quote by Spambot_2
FTFY.

His amp has a decent reverb built into it, plus the fact that he's using a TimeFactor tells me that room reverb has little to any difference to the tone he's going for.

Quote by Spambot_2
To do other stuff, mostly.

I mean they use them 57's a lot, but they rarely use 57's to mic up mostly clean sounding amp's in recording studios.

Though TS if you decide you wanna go down that route, the SM57 is definitely the most versatile mic you can find for that and up to 5 times the money.

To everybody else, my point is that mic'd amp's can sound better indeed, but it's not like every amp mic'd up with whatever mic will sound better than every amp sim, and this is one of these cases in which the bigger setup won't sound better imo

Wat?

SM57 is probably the most used mic for any kind of guitar micing. Most studios use the 57 as a base to their tone and will add in a second mic as a reinforcement for a fuller sound or to add more room into the recording, if needed. The SM57 is perfectly fine for cleans, the only other mic I might prefer more, as a single mic, is the Sennheiser e609, as mentioned, or maybe a Beyerdynamic M201TG, depending on the sound you're looking for...
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#29
Quote by Sid McCall
Source: I work in the music industry in Nashville, TN. What do you do for a living that gives you such valuable insight as found in the above quote?
I'm more than sure you see lotsa power/alt/black/thrash/death metal in nash.

I don't work in recording studios though.
Quote by MatrixClaw
I own every commercial amp simulator on the market, as well as most of the high end effects packages, and have owned the Axe-FX Standard, Axe-FX Ultra, Axe-FX II and Kemper. Pretty sure I've played with good software
I understood you were concerned about me suggesting TS to use software fx instead of pedals.

Not the AXE nor the kemper have really high quality fx.

Some high quality fx for reference - the lexicon native PCM reverbs, u-he satin and waves nls for vintage style relatively subtle distortion, antares for pitch shifting, the softube FET compressor or the CL-1B for compression.
Quote by MatrixClaw
SM57 is probably the most used mic for any kind of guitar micing.
I can't really disagree with it 'cause there's no list or statistics, though my experience has taught me otherwise.

While it's something you see lotsa times, for clean stuff I mostly see ribbons and sometimes condensers, or rarely higher tire dynamics.

I though see 57's used on high gain amps more than 9 times out of 10, yeah.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#30
Quote by Spambot_2

Not the AXE nor the kemper have really high quality fx.


This kinda stuff is on a whole new level from you disliking the Scarlett series. There are videos that compare both of these to real amps and while they're close to real amps they're not exactly the same. They are the CLOSEST you can get to pure digital emulation.


For example:

http://youtu.be/-EtxHlJ2FPo?list=UU-f76NUQN5M-Z0cd0MOP5xw

Unless you can objectively prove otherwise I'm gonna have to call bullshit on this.

As for FX, well you're really being VERY picky here. Can you prove that some other OD is better than the OD clone on an AxeFx or Kemper? Or is this just one of those "I'm being difficult" moments again?

And anyway, wasn't the conversation about amp sims v real amps. Not amp sims v stand alone vsts?
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Oct 12, 2014,
#31
Quote by ChemicalFire
This kinda stuff is on a whole new level from you disliking the Scarlett series. There are videos that compare both of these to real amps and while they're close to real amps they're not exactly the same. They are the CLOSEST you can get to pure digital emulation.
No, I didn't mean amp emulations, I meant fx.
Compression, reverb, pitch shifting...

As for the amp emulations, if an axe didn't cost that much here I'd have one myself.
Quote by ChemicalFire
As for FX, well you're really being VERY picky here.
I AM very picky.
Why wouldn't I be anyway?

Now go and download the trial versions of the software fx I listed and hear what I mean.
Quote by ChemicalFire
And anyway, wasn't the conversation about amp sims v real amps. Not amp sims v stand alone vsts?
The discussion more or less was about whether or not micing up the amp would have held better results than using good amp sims.

Then Derek said he was baffled by the fact that I suggested to use software fx and amp sims instead of the pedals and the mic'd up amp, and my response to that led to this point

How are you on copying and pasting the edited interfaces sticky from google doc's to the forum anyway?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#32
The only reason I've not done it is because I'm lazy and haven't got around to it yet.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#33
Here is a sound clip of some slapping (even though I'm not that good at it)

http://vocaroo.com/i/s00f12ZhcsdD

I'm using Guitar Rig 5. The sound is quite.. nice? Right?
I've not yet mixed anything with the different possibilities that GR5 has, this sound is a preset that already existed.

The latency is still a problem, though. so I kind of have to play "unplugged" and listen to the recording afterwards. So it's hard to get into the right mood and play correctly when not hearing the actual sound while playing.

^ One of the main reason I want to try mic'ing the amp.

Also, I'm using one of the pickups which doesn't cause any static. If I would use another pickup I would get a horrible buzz, which you still hasn't commented on, Luca?
Judging from what you wrote earlier, my guitar isn't grounded. So how do I fix that?
Last edited by Visual382 at Oct 13, 2014,
#34
Quote by Visual382
Here is a sound clip of some slapping (even though I'm not that good at it)

http://vocaroo.com/i/s00f12ZhcsdD

I'm using Guitar Rig 5. The sound is quite.. nice? Right?
I've not yet mixed anything with the different possibilities that GR5 has, this sound is a preset that already existed.

The latency is still a problem, though. so I kind of have to play "unplugged" and listen to the recording afterwards. So it's hard to get into the right mood and play correctly when not hearing the actual sound while playing.

^ One of the main reason I want to try mic'ing the amp.

Also, I'm using one of the pickups which doesn't cause any static. If I would use another pickup I would get a horrible buzz, which you still hasn't commented on, Luca?
Judging from what you wrote earlier, my guitar isn't grounded. So how do I fix that?

If you're getting a crazy buzz, it could be interference from your computer. I know when I have single coils, they can't be facing my laptop without getting a bunch of buzz. Try pointing your guitar around at different parts of your room and see if there's a difference.

Quote by Spambot_2
I'm more than sure you see lotsa power/alt/black/thrash/death metal in nash.

I don't work in recording studios though.

I'll give you a pass on this one since you're apparently from Italy, but Nashville is definitely not just for country music. There's plenty of metal music, loads of weird rock bands, and tons of bands that come to our prestigious studios from around the world to record here. Cities like LA see much more metal production, but there's still some down here.

I passed J.Mascis walking down music row the other day (where I work). I'd list some of my company's clients, but I need to draw the line somewhere in terms of personal info on the internet. Let's just say that some of the most prolific metal acts of every decade are clients of ours, I have a CD of black metal viking-themed music in my car that I got at work, sooooo yeah.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
Last edited by Sid McCall at Oct 13, 2014,
#35
Quote by Sid McCall
If you're getting a crazy buzz, it could be interference from your computer. I know when I have single coils, they can't be facing my laptop without getting a bunch of buzz. Try pointing your guitar around at different parts of your room and see if there's a difference.


I get the buzz when playing through my amp as well.
#36
Quote by Visual382
I get the buzz when playing through my amp as well.

Me too! It will come out of whatever you're plugged into if you're facing something broadcasting signals/with a certain type of screen. It may not be the problem you're having, but whatever your guitar is plugged into would not change the symptoms of that problem if you were having it.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#37
Ah, I see. I have my amp and everything close to the computer, so that might be the problem then. I'll check it out later. Thanks!