#1
There is a song that I am recording that plays at 200 bpm. There is a solo in the middle which I can play but a few notes don't ring out when I try to play it at that speed. I can play it perfectly at 160 bpm.
If I record it at 160 and speed it up using Pro Tools to 200 will it make it sound unnatural or diminish the quality in any way?
I know I will be able to play it at 200 if I keep practicing but I need to get this track out urgently.
#2
The pitch will get higher and you will be out of tune. I think there are some algorithms that do not increase the pitch, but you will get sound artifacts.
#4
You can increase speed without effecting tuning, but it gets somewhat compressed, that can sound good actually...but yeah...it's cheating...dragonforce
#5
It will not sound un-natural if you do it good, though you gotta be able to do it good, and since you're going to need to practice in order to be good at it you might as well practice playing it faster.
Name's Luca.

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#6
There is a way to change the tempo without effecting the pitch. I need to know if it will sound obvious that I sped up the track?
#7
No, it will not be obvious.
Name's Luca.

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#8
It won't sound obvious, but your tone will be altered. Sometimes I adjust the tempo of my demos, but I go back and re-track all of the non-midi bits after I find the perfect speed. The vocals and guitars get all messed up, even when they're recorded at a high quality and warped with Ableton's top-notch software, and only adjusted like 6-8 bpm. I would imagine that going from 160 to 200 would sound absolutely terrible.
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#9
Yes, and People who say different seem to have terrible ears! This question is a bit like asking will auto-tune effect my vocals
Last edited by HellToKitty at Oct 8, 2014,
#10
If you use a software with a good algorithm you may be able to do it so that people won't even notice what you did.

PaulStretch in Audacity can stretch your audio to hell and yet keep a smooth, artifact-free, sound. There may be something as good as this meant for speeding things up too.
#11
Quote by mp8andrade
If you use a software with a good algorithm you may be able to do it so that people won't even notice what you did...

Don't worry a lot of people won't notice if you speeded up the guitars. But that doesn't mean that they still sound the same. A lot of people can't tell a good sounding guitar from a bad one either.
Last edited by HellToKitty at Oct 8, 2014,
#12
Will it be less obvious if I have other tracks in the song and I mix it in well? I just don't want it to end up sounding robotic.
#13
Quote by ls2014
Will it be less obvious if I have other tracks in the song and I mix it in well? I just don't want it to end up sounding robotic.

Only one way to find out. At this point, you may as well just record a piece of it and speed it up and see what it sounds like, there's only so much speculation this forum can offer until you actually try it out. Shouldn't take you more than 10 minutes to figure out if it'll work.
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#14
Mike oldfield used to record a lot of his guitars at half speed I don't quite know what he did something about a. flat eq but if you Googled about that I know he said how in an interview somewhere
#16
The Beatles sped up the piano solo on "In My Life" and it didn't sound unnatural. They also sped up and slowed down vocals a lot, sometimes as a deliberate effect. But they used tape, and my experiences of trying to achieve the same effect with digital tracks have all sounded unnatural.

Experiment with it a little, maybe try it with tape (you'd have to play the notes lower since tape speeds up AND increases pitch simultaneously), and if you can't get a good sound then just play it faster, or get someone else to play the part for you.
#17
Do it and find out, but I'd be willing to bet that it'll sound off. Firstly, you're not just speeding it up a little, you're speeding it up 25%. Secondly I'm guessing you're not using some big fancy bit of expensive software to do it, so you're more likely to get artifacts.
I don't see what could be so urgent you can't spend a few hours practicing it, yet can spend a few hours asking a forum whether speeding it up would work.
#18
It depends on how drastic the change is.

Either way, don't do it. I would only use the speed changing tool for a sample or some other weird artifact that I wanted to have an obvious foreign effect.
#19
Try Amazing Slow Downer. I've used the demo before, but never paid for full. You can try searching for products like ASD.

Quote by HellToKitty
Yes, and People who say different seem to have terrible ears! This question is a bit like asking will auto-tune effect my vocals

Auto tune directly affects pitch, of course it will sound different. How that correlates to changes in tempo without altering pitch, I have no idea.
#22
^ won't change anything, really.
Quote by HellToKitty
Yes, and People who say different seem to have terrible ears! This question is a bit like asking will auto-tune effect my vocals
You sound like you've either never did that, or you've only used fairly low quality stuff to do that.

Also you would likely be surprised if you found a list of records which autotune was used on
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#23
I've done it - but only by 4% - and I think it sounded OK.

I realised the song sounded a little sluggish and didn't want to re-record it all. I made sure I was capable of playing it at that speed, otherwise it would have felt like cheating.

25% would be obvious, though, I think. Things like pick-attack time wouldn't sound correct.
#24
Quote by Spambot_2
^ won't change anything, really.


I think there's a difference, it's about making the change in the part of the signal chain where it produces the least unwanted effects, whatever your preferences are.

Quick test I just made.

https://soundcloud.com/miikakeskim-ki/test

-First track is the riff played at slow speed
-Second track, slightly to left, is DI guitars sped up
-Third track, slightly to right, is rendered guitars sped up

The riff goes from original real time to increase by
-25%
-50%
-100%
-200%

Other than the order where speed and pitch is changed, the signal chain is identical.
I think the difference is audible enough to consider one track over the other.
Last edited by Keskimaki at Oct 9, 2014,
#25
^^ Is it me or did the guitar lose a lot of weight the moment you sped it up? It's hard to tell if it's the pan you used or the speeding effect. May I ask why the hell did you pan the guitars?

Anyway, the more it speeds the less natural and more machine-like it gets so, for me, it's a no-go.
#26
Quote by mp8andrade
^^ Is it me or did the guitar lose a lot of weight the moment you sped it up? It's hard to tell if it's the pan you used or the speeding effect. May I ask why the hell did you pan the guitars?

Anyway, the more it speeds the less natural and more machine-like it gets so, for me, it's a no-go.


Well, the panning was just for making clear the pre and post pitchshift were different channels. And yes, in both cases the sound will be affected. Especially since the percentages here are quite radical.
#27
I used to do it on Reaper and my Singer found out how to do it on Pro Tools.
It does NOT raise pitch.

One of the biggest things not to do are those tight 16th note triplets or gallops while palm muting completely. They end up blurring together into almost one note once you speed it up. I leave my 16th note triplets/gallops a little open to keep the notes more segregated.

I would do my best to not make it a bigger BPM increase than 20+, and man up to almost everything below 140 BPM. That or just get way better, but not all of us have the drive to be perfect at 200 BPM with our tremelo picking, and then double track it, lol
#28
Quote by bdof
I used to do it on Reaper and my Singer found out how to do it on Pro Tools.
It does NOT raise pitch.


Technically the pitch lowered in this case.


When you speed up audio, the samples come through faster and have to be lowered back to the original pitch.
#29
If you've made recordings that people have listened to before, and you're suddenly making a 40 bpm jump seemingly overnight, it won't take them long to figure out how that was accomplished
#30
Les Paul sped up his solos so much that some of the high harmonies he is playing on his leads are literally higher than you could possibly achieve on a normal guitar neck. Did it sound un-natural? Yes but that was the sound he was looking for because in the early 50's guitar players had never heard a sound like that before and had no idea how he was doing it. On the other hand it was tape and he wasn't working in a digital domain and didn't have some of the digital conversion artifacts to worry about. I agree with those who say try it and see what you think. It might just sound un-natural and that might be an awesome sound. Do flangers, chorus effects, wah etc. we put on guitars sound natural?
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Oct 16, 2014,