#1
Sometimes I will be noodling around and I will create a rhythm that I like. Recently I created a riff that was just a power chord rhythm that I thought sounded bitching. I came up with a few different sections where the power chords changed and then made a few riffs that went with that I planned to record and overlay together. I liked what I was jamming on so much that I wrote down the tab so that I wouldn't forget. The problem is, when I started playing it the next day it just didn't "feel" right to me. The first time I was playing it felt musical and like the rhythm matched with what I wanted to play, however the next day it just felt like I was playing chords and I wasn't expressing what I wanted.

This happens to me all the time, I will be in the moment with a song and create a great expression of what I am feeling at the moment, however when I come back to it even though the notes are the same, it doesn't feel right anymore. Has anyone experienced this? It is holding me back because I know a good song probably takes more than a day to develop, but I hit a wall and everything just goes to shit after that initial time that I make a song.
#2
Record it first thing so you can go back to it.

If I come up with something on the guitar, I can guarantee that if I just try and remember it, or tab it out, it will completely different that the original.
#4
ALWAYS record the idea immediately. I use a simple app on my iphone that requires two taps to record. The slightest delay, even 5 minutes, sometimes changes an idea and you loose the groove.
#5
Personally, I view that as a sign that the song wasnt that good. But if you think you lost something worth keeping, then yea, incorporate recording or writing sheet music into your practice
#6
I know plenty of musicians who just have the recorder running whenever they're playing anything. They don't want to miss something.

Working on your ear will improve your ability to remember things.
#7
At first you may be excited because you came up with something new. And that may be why you first thought it sounded great. But yeah, it may also be that you kind of forgot the groove. Maybe try also writing other instruments. Also, sometimes it's good to just finish your song, no matter how bad it sounds like. Writing complete songs isn't always easy. You were happy with the idea in the first place so just record it. It may be that after some time you'll start liking it again. Or maybe you just have to hear the recorded version.

Did you only come up with a guitar part? It may be that yesterday you also came up with some other parts in your head (the "groove") that you weren't really aware of. Maybe you just couldn't get in the original groove. As I said, also write other instrument parts (especially drums). That makes you remember the groove, not just the riffs.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Dont listen to these NAY-SAYERS.

When you make a new song, practice it a few times to get it down, it has a special vibe to it, record it immediately. The way you strum can totally affect the feel of a song. THAT is what usually gets forgotten is the strumming. So if you have an idea you care about, record it immediately.

Don't listen to these fools that say you were kidding yourself. If it sounded ****ing rad to you when you made it up, it probably was. Recording your songs immediately is so important. I completely forgot a badass song I made this summer and was going insane trying to remember it but thank god I made a recording of it, and was SOOOO relieved. Turns out it is just as bitchin as I had thought.
#10
Well, it COULD be, that as a guitarist, many have tendancy to write riff-based music. Sometimes a little too much so. If it's just riff-on-riff-on-riff-on-riff, it tends to not have enough contrast to really take you to alot of places.

But then again, some people appearently "feel" stuff like Djent, so what the hell do i know :P

Also, note that there's a veeeery large gap from a riff, or an idea, to a song. Maybe it would sound just how you want it if you had other parts on it as well.

Or maybe you were high last night. Stuff sounds good, then.
FUCK YOU ALL!

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#11
Happens to me as well. Just save this song somewhere, perhaps start a new one when you feel like it to reset your brain and then you can come back to it later. Feelings change over time it's natural...so perhaps do something, anything, that could get you into the same mindset.
#12
Quote by Bollockser
Turns out it is just as bitchin as I had thought.


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"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

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#13
Thanks for the input. When I jam by myself I kind of just do little instrumentals and see where I go, although sometimes I feel like I have to constantly be thinking where Im going next and sometimes I dont find the idea till after a while. Is it a good idea to generally make a chord progression first and then practice trying different voicings once you have the rhythm down? Sometimes I try to think about the chords I'm using, and other times I try to just play by feel and see where it goes, is it generally idea to always know what notes you're playing? Sometimes I throw different little chord combinations in that sound good but I don't actually know what they are.
Last edited by hanginout at Oct 12, 2014,
#14
I write production music for TV shows... have to crank out good-feeling tunes quickly. Often I start with a good drum loop and bass track, don't over-think it, just play! Usually the first couple ideas are the best... then I layer tracks with different tones... pan L & R if it sounds cool...perfect the drums if needed, then mix. Key is: Keep it simple and find the pocket...or place it better in your DAW if needed!
#15
Quote by hanginout
Thanks for the input. When I jam by myself I kind of just do little instrumentals and see where I go, although sometimes I feel like I have to constantly be thinking where Im going next and sometimes I dont find the idea till after a while. Is it a good idea to generally make a chord progression first and then practice trying different voicings once you have the rhythm down? Sometimes I try to think about the chords I'm using, and other times I try to just play by feel and see where it goes, is it generally idea to always know what notes you're playing? Sometimes I throw different little chord combinations in that sound good but I don't actually know what they are.

Just follow your ear. What you hear is right. Chord/note names don't matter. They are just names that describe what you are hearing. The most important thing is if it sounds good to you.

But I don't think it matters what "methods" you use to write songs. What matters is what the song sounds like and if you are happy with the sound. Do what works for you. Just try different stuff. If you don't know the chord names but know what you are after, it doesn't matter. You can always figure out the theoretical stuff afterwards. Sound first, then theory.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#16
Yes, I've had this. It can be down to the accenting and meter that isn't notated in tab. Recording the earliest stages is the only solution I've found.
#17
Quote by hanginout
Sometimes I will be noodling around and I will create a rhythm that I like. Recently I created a riff that was just a power chord rhythm that I thought sounded bitching. I came up with a few different sections where the power chords changed and then made a few riffs that went with that I planned to record and overlay together. I liked what I was jamming on so much that I wrote down the tab so that I wouldn't forget. The problem is, when I started playing it the next day it just didn't "feel" right to me. The first time I was playing it felt musical and like the rhythm matched with what I wanted to play, however the next day it just felt like I was playing chords and I wasn't expressing what I wanted.

This happens to me all the time, I will be in the moment with a song and create a great expression of what I am feeling at the moment, however when I come back to it even though the notes are the same, it doesn't feel right anymore. Has anyone experienced this? It is holding me back because I know a good song probably takes more than a day to develop, but I hit a wall and everything just goes to shit after that initial time that I make a song.


I use tapemachine app on my phone to record anything I like. It's really easy for this to
happen. The rhythm is important.