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#1
I'm going to spare you the whole "I have dreams of being a rockstar" paragraph. I don't ask for much in life. I'm in love with my guitar and would one day like to make a living as a musician. The problem is, you probably would have a better chance making it to the moon in a boat that making a respectable wage in this industry. Is it even possible to somehow make around 45,000 a year? I'm in school now to become a computer engineer. I figure it's the smartest thing to do with my life. When I die though, I don't want to regret not giving it a shot. I'd like to be able to share something I love with people. Is it even feasible to be in a successful rock band these days? Where would I start?
#2
Well I can't speak for professional musicians who lets say, play for alice cooper or other big names, but their names arent really known, or play for a tv show, just things like that, that take a professional musician. But it does blow my mind, that, lets say Unknown Hinson, is a fantastic guitar player and musician, and is touring around nowadays, had to call touring quits a couple years ago because he wasnt making any money any more. Other examples like that. They arent making money really these days, because what do they make for money, "music", and what does everyone download for free? "their music". Theyre making a product and were getting it for free. So they have to make money from tickets and stuff, I get that, but my point i guess is its seems 10X's as hard to make money as a professional musician. It's Bs lol
Last edited by mabbamam at Oct 10, 2014,
#3
its impossible to get to a professional level while studying at the same time to become engineer. of course no one is stopping you to do both things at the same time and form a band and compose tunes, but you'll probably be terrible/ be surrounded with unmotivated band members. just know that there are people out there practicing, networking, studying, composing almost 100% of their time

i finished a tough science program and i had to study all the time to barely pass some of the most difficult classes. 30 minutes of guitar noodling once in a while wont get you anywhere unless you are a genius composer. you'll probably grow out of the successful rock band dream soon enough anyway
#4
If your idea of making a living as a musician involves solely being in a succesfull rock band, then yes, that can be pretty hard, especially if it's not your first priority. But you know, you can be a session musician, a producer, a composer, teacher (or all of these things at the same time and also play in your band because who needs sleep anyway)
#5
If you want to the odds are astronomical.

If you want to be a workhorse musician making a modest living that's doable. But your going to have to study your ass off and probably go to to music school. There's pleeenty of people doing this
#6
Quote by SuperKid
its impossible to get to a professional level while studying at the same time to become engineer. of course no one is stopping you to do both things at the same time and form a band and compose tunes, but you'll probably be terrible/ be surrounded with unmotivated band members. just know that there are people out there practicing, networking, studying, composing almost 100% of their time

i finished a tough science program and i had to study all the time to barely pass some of the most difficult classes. 30 minutes of guitar noodling once in a while wont get you anywhere unless you are a genius composer. you'll probably grow out of the successful rock band dream soon enough anyway


This. If you want to be a musician, then you have to BE a musician.

Everyone wants to be a professional musician until they realize that to do that, you're looking at 8-12 hours a day, 6 days a week of practicing and studying.

It takes the same energy it takes to build the knowledge and skill set needed for another career. Good luck trying to do both OP
#7
Yes you can if you got the goods but... The guys making good money regularly tour, teach, do session work, TV work, product endorsements, store opening appearances, and every dog and pony show they can find. Many were couch surfing for 10 years before things came together. Most would do it again if asked but the personal cost is very high for professional musicians.

Thirty years ago I took a long look at my prospects as a pro musician and walked away. No regrets here.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by RiffEmAll
I'm going to spare you the whole "I have dreams of being a rockstar" paragraph. I don't ask for much in life. I'm in love with my guitar and would one day like to make a living as a musician. The problem is, you probably would have a better chance making it to the moon in a boat that making a respectable wage in this industry. Is it even possible to somehow make around 45,000 a year? I'm in school now to become a computer engineer. I figure it's the smartest thing to do with my life. When I die though, I don't want to regret not giving it a shot. I'd like to be able to share something I love with people. Is it even feasible to be in a successful rock band these days? Where would I start?


Well lets see.

$45,000 a year.

$865 a week (abouts).

How would you go about making such money? Think it out. If you reckon it's easy, go ahead. If not, don't.

It has always been hard to make a living as a musician. The truth is that the services of a musician are not required, most people have no need for them. However most people do need people to fix their car, do their taxes, represent them in court etc.

As you are probably aware, the market for jobs that used to be considered "safe" has taken a hit, and so has pay for musicians. The local pub now decided to save money by putting on a CD player instead of paying a guy who takes breaks every 45 mins.

That's not to say it's impossible - just that the guys who do make a living as a musician are (a) ridiculously good, (b) ridiculously dedicated and (c) just a little bit lucky.

I see that you're studying computer engineering, and there's more demand for computer engineers than musicians so it is an easier option. I would like to let you know though that the fact you have a day job does not prevent you from making music and sharing it with the world. You may even find that you enjoy music more because it becomes a break from work, rather than work itself, and you will not be pressured to make money from it, allowing you to enjoy it without any pressure.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Yea that^

Being a musician is doable and all, but you pretty much accept that there is going to be several years of your lifewhere you have close to no money. After that, you still have a modest life ahead of you unless you strike gold and write a hit single or something


If comfort (and by that I mean paying your bills, your rent, having gas, and eating every day) is a necessity for you than don't be a musician
#10
In reality, there is a lot of work as a musician.

However a true musician should be just that. You don't get a job in science without knowing the prerequisites and for most musicians the same it true. If you want to be a musician you should either be treating it as full time study or studying it at a professional institute.

Personally I don't think music is very competitive, at least anywhere near as much as it is made out to be. At my local conservatorium under 100 students have graduated guitar performance the past decade.

I think most people see the world of music through the eyes of famous bands but in reality that is a mall minority of music.

The underlying point it, music like any other profession requires study and a lot of effort. Playing position one pentatonic and smoking marijuana is an easy way to end your dreams before they start.
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#11
You must have your own style.
No one will pay to see knock-off band that play ALMOST like Iron Maiden for example. They will just listen to real IM.

Play something unique. Surprise your audience. Find a niche and be a best at it.

And of course - have some ****ing great tunes.

Sadly even all of this isn't enough to make even modest success, you will need lots of hard work, a bit of talent and shitload of luck.
#12
Your best bet at making a living as a musician is to become a session player or teacher. To be a session player, you need to be able to sight read music and adapt to any and every style of music. You have to be able to nail your part in one take when the tape's rolling. Studio time is money.

Then there's always the wedding/event/party band route, which you'll need to learn several hundred songs covering all styles and genres to be prepared for any occasion and requests.

Let there be no mistake. Those are JOBS. You accept that you're doing what you NEED to do to make a living, not what you WANT to do.

The chances of making a successful career playing original music is very slim. It's not impossible, but the odds are stacked high against you. You really need record label promotion to have a shot at making any money at all. Even then, you're going to be making money from ticket sales and merch. Making money from actually selling music is almost a thing of the past. Unless you're a major pop star.

Good luck with whatever you do. Just keep reality in perspective, and focus your energy in the right direction to make the most of it!
#13
As some people said, it depends on what you mean by making a living as a musician. If you are going to play your own stuff in a band, it is of course possible but I wouldn't count on it. If you are talking about teaching or being a studio/session musician, it is possible, and I think a bit more likely than your rock band being successful. That of course also requires a lot of work. A session musician needs to have a good technique and needs to know different styles. Well, same with a guitar teacher.

Then there are cover/party bands who play in clubs and weddings and parties for people who just want to party and dance. I would guess there's a demand for this kind of bands. But again, if you are interested in doing your own vision, this is definitely not for you. You need to play songs that the audience knows which means top 10 stuff and all time classics (also songs that you hate, unless you are really into mainstream music). It's all about pleasing the audience, not yourself.

It's also possible to play in a band and do something else as your day job. That way you'll have a steady income and also be able to do what you like.

^ Lol, ninja'd.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 11, 2014,
#14
In my experience it's pretty hard to land any regular paying work as a musician. I'm actually quite surprised by some of the comments above saying that it's really easy to become a session musician and that there's a lot of work for musos out there. I can assure you that the supply of musicians far outweighs the demand for them.

That said maybe all of you have massive hookups, are supporting One Direction and are official Roland promoters.

This is my general breakdown of fees as a musician. No theory or speculation - this is what I actually get paid.

For covers gigs I'll generally walk away with about $150-200

If I do live sound for a band, supplying the equipment I charge $200-$300. That's undercharging but I don't rely on my muso income and Im developing live sound skills.

Original bands - one of mine makes $100-$300 a gig. The money is invested directly back into the band so the band members including myself bear a loss.

Recording studio session stuff - $100-150 per track.

Live session work - $100-$150/hour.

The most amount of cash I ever made in a year from music was $15,000. About 50 gigs plus live and studio session work. I was totally burnt out by the end though. Most years it's closer to $7,000. That's about $150 a week for those playing at home. Not bad pocket money but not enough to live on.

That's still below the poverty line too. I had a day job however so it basically just covered my rent and bills.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
It's completely possible, but you need to be a professional.

You probably won't make it just trawling around with your rock band.

You need to be playing in your own band, playing as a hired gun in other bands, composing & arranging (both for yourself and for hire), and teaching.

You need to be doing this across all genres, and yes, you need to play music that isn't your "thing."

All that stuff adds up. You need to actually be a businessman and not another bedroom rock star, so to speak.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#16
as the others have noted..its a rough business..you can make money..but as a sole source of income you would need to be at it 7 days a week..really..just getting started to get gigs you would need to be playing for pay almost every night and looking for future work..fill in..session/studio/teaching during the day..you would have to keep a contact list active and "network" with all the musicians/singers/studio producers etc on a constant basis

on top of that you have to have practice time to keep your chops up and learn new stuff..not just the music but the "sound" .. how to reproduce a sound/style on demand..vital in studio work..

if your in a large city your chances of getting work are much better of course..but your competing with many other musicians with the same goal..work!

I did studio work for 12 yrs in los angeles (years ago) and it was not easy then to make ends meet..now there are far less places to play(clubs, bars, restaurants, parties) for quick cash and the studio work has changed a lot due to technology and numbers of musicians who can play at studio level today. I have met some players who were monsters ..knew hundreds of songs from country to jazz and knew how to get the "sound" of most well know guitarists and they had day jobs .. bartenders, waiters etc. to keep afloat..remember this..the world only needs one jimi Hendrix..there are thousands of them out there wondering why they can make it..i have even seen one guy at a freeway exit with a pignose amp and a strat doing foxy lady..the sad part..the guy was really good

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Oct 11, 2014,
#17
What did all the big bands do?

They had something that other people could see in them and take the chance with them.

It could be Chas Chandler who saw Jimi in 1966 in New York.

It could be Metallica in 1983 pre Kill'em'all where Johnny Z did a million $ job for making them ready for Electra n 1984.

You need the music and someone to believe in you that would know how to market it! Or somebody who does like the right kind of people in the industry.

It really has much less to do with how great you can play. That only works to a certain degree and crowd. Take Varney's label for shred players not everyones cup of tee but Yngwie got his chance and then once in Japan he got the solo deal. Someone who could take it further.

The most popular singer in Denmark is Kim Larsen. My former frontman and guitarist back in 2001 has the same type of vibe has landed his job doing the best of Kim Larsen and it has been going on for years by the time of writing this and he makes a good living of it. Sometimes solo and sometimes with a band. He had the music and interest then came across the option along the way when the band started 2000 did not work out after several atempts and years.

So get the music together and record it. Then find the person who can help you get further or learn to market/promote yourself. Now with internet it should be much easier to actually do but few musicians only come to the instruments and not having a clue to whats next.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Oct 11, 2014,
#18
learn trombone and join the military band making upwards of $70k a year

or play your stupid guitar and have your stupid dreams
#19
Quote by anders.jorgense
You need the music and someone to believe in you that would know how to market it! Or somebody who does like the right kind of people in the industry.

.................

So get the music together and record it. Then find the person who can help you get further or learn to market/promote yourself.


I like the sentiment of your post, but signing an artist and developing them is not really a thing these days.

We all know the music industry is shrinking - it's been shouted at us for years. Now, more than ever, record companies are not willing to invest time/money into you unless you've already proven that you can make cash yourself.

Think about it from a business standpoint. Which band would you put money into, with the aim of making it back?

(a) The band that just started, has some interesting songs and great potential.

Or

(b) The band that has 100-200 people show up to their shows on a regular basis, paying $10 each.

Basically I'm saying that it's not good enough to write music, record it, then wait for the magic to happen. Those artists who get signed have usually been pushing their band/music for years upon years, and have a decent fanbase to boot.

So I think the part where you say "learn to market yourself" is the best point you make. Unfortunately I'm not very good at that side of things so I'll just stop there.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#20
I should have made it clear, I don't really care about being famous. I just want to be in a pretty successful band locally. I practice A LOT. Probably too much. I put in 4 hours on most days but a minimum of at least and hour and a half. I've heard guys like Slash and Eddie Van Halen played for 12 hours but I figured it was a myth not to mention dangerous. I thought about saving my money from my computer science job for a few years, then take a risk and be a full time musician.
#21
You can expect about $300 or so for a good band in a bar (around here anyways), if it's a 3 piece, $100 each, house PA and your own personal gear, maybe some personal monitors is all you need. If you can do 5 gigs a week, that's about half of what you want, maybe with merchandise and CD sales you can get the other half. Key is having a good band that keeps the bar busy and drinking

yeah studio time would have to be taken as efficiently /home as you can
Last edited by Tempoe at Oct 11, 2014,
#22
As someone who wants to make a living from music as well, this topic frustrates me.

I look at stars who seem to have just been given their status one day, no work done at all. And then I look at those who have done a lifetime of work and have nothing to show for it.

I wonder how much the celebrity musicians know about music. Are they told what to sing? Do they write it themselves? Is it actually marketed garbage or something worth the 0's?

I wonder how much the working musician actually works. Does he really try? Is the key to simply try and try and work and work? Is his music really worth something?

The quick way (it seems) is to be a physically attractive female with a voice, willing to do anything the market wants you to do.

The slow way (it seems) is to be yourself and original, working to support your music until your music supports itself.
#23
Nothing is impossible, but i will agree on the comment that there are defiantly more musicians than there are demand for musicians. That is why you have to be good at many things to get by, like i play every type of music out there so i can get all types of session work, i also sight read, teach, transcribe etc etc.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#24
Quote by Will Lane
As someone who wants to make a living from music as well, this topic frustrates me.

I look at stars who seem to have just been given their status one day, no work done at all. And then I look at those who have done a lifetime of work and have nothing to show for it.

I wonder how much the celebrity musicians know about music. Are they told what to sing? Do they write it themselves? Is it actually marketed garbage or something worth the 0's?

I wonder how much the working musician actually works. Does he really try? Is the key to simply try and try and work and work? Is his music really worth something?

The quick way (it seems) is to be a physically attractive female with a voice, willing to do anything the market wants you to do.

The slow way (it seems) is to be yourself and original, working to support your music until your music supports itself.


Imo the celebrity musicians are simply products of a big corporation. JUST like Fastfood. Its manufactured music. Manufactured artist. Manufactured product for the young and impressionable, who are brain washed on what to like through advertising and such. BUT, Are they making money... Yes. Do they deserve it and all that, imo no. Not at all. That to me is what is really F'ing people who want to be "professional musicians" in what ever form. In America at least.
#25
I watched an interesting seminar that John Mayer did a few years back at Berklee College of Music (I think you can still find it online).

His main point was: The public is never wrong. You can't expect to be completely uncompromising in your artistry and to make any sort of money. The guys who make the most (All that pop garbage we love to hate on) are the guys who compromise the most. They take what would have been deep lyrics and musical ideas and dumb them down to make them more accessible.

The result is tunes like 'Your Body Is a Wonderland' or 'Daughters' (for John). Mayer never wanted to be known as 'that emotional dude'. He likes Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan, which is the sole reason he formed The John Mayer Trio and went off playing 60s-70s rock for a little while. This was after he wrote what some consider (in the words of a wise Youtuber) "The worst pop garbage to ever come out of the '00s".

If your thing is '80s hair metal, the chances of becoming the next big thing and being heavily successful go from slim to none if you're not willing to compromise. We can always argue "look at Steel Panther", but I think that's a terrible argument...

And yes, John says that by "compromise", he means what music snobs all around the world call "selling out". The fact is, we just don't live in a world where every uncompromising artist who works hard can make it.

John also goes on to talk about how music shifts over the decades and how toward the end of each decade, we, as the public, see the coming decade as a new time period (and a new identity) and get into new music (you can see it pretty blatantly from the 50s-now). John said at the end of the '90s, the industry was basically taking in any male singer songwriters it could find. That's how he made his career.

So his advice to these aspiring musicians was to hone their craft (instruments, voices and songwriting abilities) and to pay close attention to what's going on in the industry. If in 2017 the next big thing looks like it's going to be disco, your best bet is to make music that has some disco elements in it, even if that means compromising your artistic integrity. When you have 2-3 tracks that will sell an album (read: pop garbage), then you can use the rest of the space on the album to make tracks that you like a little better and maybe eventually you can make all tracks that you like, but the public is likely to complain that 'your old stuff is the only stuff worth listening to'.

Anyway, I figured that was relevant to this topic, and it makes sense.
Last edited by mjones1992 at Oct 12, 2014,
#26
Quote by Will Lane
As someone who wants to make a living from music as well, this topic frustrates me.

I look at stars who seem to have just been given their status one day, no work done at all. And then I look at those who have done a lifetime of work and have nothing to show for it.

I wonder how much the celebrity musicians know about music. Are they told what to sing? Do they write it themselves? Is it actually marketed garbage or something worth the 0's?

I wonder how much the working musician actually works. Does he really try? Is the key to simply try and try and work and work? Is his music really worth something?

The quick way (it seems) is to be a physically attractive female with a voice, willing to do anything the market wants you to do.

The slow way (it seems) is to be yourself and original, working to support your music until your music supports itself.

Most mainstream artists have a pretty good voice and can dance - they are pretty good singers and showmen. And that's pretty much everything a regular mainstream listener pays attention to - the singer (lyrics, voice, melody) and the show (if he/she looks good and if he/she can dance and that kind of stuff). I think those are the main things a mainstream artist needs.

Many times mainstream artists don't write their own songs or at least they use professional songwriters for most of their songs. Not all of them are like that of course. For example, I think Lady Gaga and Justin Timberlake mostly write their own songs.

But as I said, they are usually pretty good singers. They usually have a good voice and can perform well. They may not be responsible of what their songs sound like but they are still good performers. So I wouldn't say they don't do any work. Not every good looking woman/man becomes a world famous pop star. You need more than that.

Yes, they are products. But as I said, most of them are good singers and showmen.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#27
Most mainstream artists have been working for a very long time to get where they are now. Check out the biography of a couple of mainstream artists to find out how they got where they are now.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#28
Whatever you do DON'T BECOME AN AUDIO ENGINEER. It might sound great, but it really isn't I used to engineer music for a while it was a complete pain in the ass setting up crappy bands then recording, and then mixing their music. I might of made $40 an hour, but for all that work especially staying up 12 hours straight to record then mix it's frustrating. You have people bitching at you left, and right "oh we want it this way" "Oh put some overdub on my vocals" It's even worse when half the people recording barely know how to play their instruments. I had one case where the guy couldn't even get a simple open chord progression down so I had to go in there, and play it for him.


Guitarist are a dime a dozen like I always say for every 100,000 guitarist there's at least one decent one. Its highly possible to make money off of music, but I wouldn't even want to get back into the industry it's too pressuring, and demanding not to mention there's a lot of wannabe rock stars or rap stars that think they're hot shit, and get demanded to be treated like royalty.


If you take the session musician route it would be easier than engineering, but I think it's highly overrated no one really needs a session musician now a days. Even if you end up becoming a session musician you'll barely be making money from it unless you're the #1 go to guy in the area you're working in. Taking the band route in my opinion is horrible every person you'll ever meet that's semi into music is a lazy as hell I've had band members that would show up late.


I've had band members that thought they were hot shit because they could play at a mediocre level.. If you're getting into music to be famous you ought to just quit right now it's stupid I can understand making money off of it because it's your passion, but just because you want to be a big rock star is pretty stupid IMO. Any moron can be a rock star there's people out there that can barely strum 4 chords yet they have huge record deals.

By the way in no means is music competitive a lot of people seem to see it as that, but lets be real here there's a lot of dudes that can play their asses off that are homeless. Mean while there's a huge pop star out there that can barely even hold a note that's super famous, and has money falling out of the sky. Any moron can make it in this industry you're seen more as a commodity than anything you don't have to be skilled, but just good at selling yourself.

Take it from a guy that has actually worked in the industry it's filled with a whole bunch of self righteous snobs, and not to mention but the music industry is collapsing at a pretty fast rate. If anything studios everywhere are getting shut down because now a days anyone can record in their homes, and the listeners wont be able to tell the difference between a professional mix, and an amateur mix.


Mainstream listeners really don't care about art not like actual musicians who are always open minded, and constantly digging for the next gem to listen to.. If anything the majority of the time people just buy what's marketed at them look at any typical casual music listeners IPod they have a lot of pop. I'm not saying pop is a bad thing, but they don't really have any diversity in the things they listen to everyone used to listen to a lot of trap music now everyone's on the EDM wave.
Last edited by Black_devils at Oct 12, 2014,
#29
Quote by Black_devils
I had one case where the guy couldn't even get a simple open chord progression down so I had to go in there, and play it for him.

Haha, that's actually hilarious. The sound engineer playing the band's music for them.
#30
To hell with being famous, I just want to be a really good guitar player and have a decent band that can average around 500 people. Your post was depressing but eye opening. I actually considered being a producer but I'm glad you told me the truth. I'll just stick to what I was going to do before, finish school, get a job, wake up early to practice and play in some clubs for fun.
#31
^^ Yeah it happens a lot, but that's what happens when you pick up an instrument just because you want to be "Famous". Those type of people end up picking a musical instrument thinking it's the easiest thing even then end up finding the only way to advance in it is to be disciplined, and dedicated. There's a lot of people that are in it to be stars they don't really have the passion for it... Things like that make me sad there's so much posers out there it's ridiculous!
Last edited by Black_devils at Oct 12, 2014,
#33
Quote by RiffEmAll
To hell with being famous, I just want to be a really good guitar player and have a decent band that can average around 500 people. Your post was depressing but eye opening. I actually considered being a producer but I'm glad you told me the truth. I'll just stick to what I was going to do before, finish school, get a job, wake up early to practice and play in some clubs for fun.



That's a great aim I really wish it was easy to make money from music, but truth is it isn't..
If anything still stick with practicing your guitar because you're passionate about it keep grinding those hours in the woodshed to become the best damn guitarist you can be man. You could make it, but don't fall solely on that idea have a skill that you can make money off of while pursing music so you don't have to sweat paying the bills or being homeless.


I'm not trying to scare you, but i'm just giving you some insight on what really happens a lot of people end up thinking they're going to be the next big thing, but they don't. It's all possible if you have the right connections, but if you don't I highly doubt it. Right now i'm still engineering, but god damn I hate this shit. I wouldn't even consider audio engineers to be musicians even though I am a musician, but most of the guys in here don't give a ****. I see a lot of people come into this studio wanting to intern, and the guy that owns the studio ends up using them then firing them it pisses me off...


'"Dream on, but don't imagine that all your dreams will come true".
Last edited by Black_devils at Oct 12, 2014,
#35
4 by my count. Including one to apologise for making too many posts.

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#36
imo audio engineering sounds like a lot of hard work and not as fun as you might think unless you make your own music or have the chance of working with professional musicians (you probably will have to deal with crappy rock/metal musicians most of the time. a lot of great performers don't record their music or simply try to produce it by themselves or will just having all their shit down and record everything in a day at the studio to economize, meaning less money for the producer)

the most interesting aspect of the tech stuff is perhaps the live recording of venues, scientific research, and all the applications in sound design/video games music

i think there is money to be made in music, and a good way to understand your environment is check out what people around you are doing, and see if it works out well for them. in my case, the video game industry is huge where I live, so I try to orient some of my activities around that area while still studying, working on my music, teaching, etc. everyone has a different path. you just have to know beforehand what is likely to work and what will probably be a failure
#37
Quote by RiffEmAll
To hell with being famous, I just want to be a really good guitar player and have a decent band that can average around 500 people. Your post was depressing but eye opening. I actually considered being a producer but I'm glad you told me the truth. I'll just stick to what I was going to do before, finish school, get a job, wake up early to practice and play in some clubs for fun.


If your band drew 500 people to each show, you'd already be at a professional level, or at least should seriously consider it.

Otherwise yeah, you can totally have a job AND play guitar as a hobby. That's fine.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#38
It's funny how compromising your artistic integrity for mass appeal is called "selling out" and considered a bad thing, yet every artist would be pretty pleased if their shows were to sell out.
Si
#39
^ On a sort of related note, a while back it hit me that changing your music to sell more of it is considered selling out, but doing a day job you hate (and maybe even disagree with morally/ethically) so you can afford to not sell out in your music isn't. I'm not sure there's all that much difference there.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#40
I used to work a job as an agent for musicians who worked on cruise lines. We had dozens of guys coming to us looking for gigs. The irony was that we had more musicians than we could use, but very few of them could actually cut it. And the guys who could handle the gig with no sweat could get higher paying gigs on land that wouldn't require them to not see their families for 6 months.
There are gigs out there, but you're going to need to be a great sight reader, you're going to need to be able to play all kinds of genres, and you're going to be shocked at how low the pay is. That's simply the music industry today.

As for making money playing rock music, even the guys you think "made it" (a video on MTV, tours, a record deal, that whole thing) are flat broke. The way record contracts are structured combined with the shrinking sales and escalating costs of tours means that unless you're a true rock star, you are not making real money. Often, you're going into debt.

For all the guys saying "Oh, I don't need money, I just want to play guitar," I hear you. But as you get older, there are other priorities. When you have rent and food and bills to pay for, that gets STRESSFUL. Money doesn't buy happiness, but it sure as hell makes happiness easier to obtain.
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