#1
I recently got a Schecter Diamond series Stiletto Custom 5, and the B string is kinda floppy and sorta sounds like its being slapped. Are B strings usually like this? Would a thicker gauge make a difference? it has a .130 currently.
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#2
Thicker gauge will help but not much.

Can you string the bass through body? A particularly bad b string is often the symptom of top loading a bass that should be thru body

If this is the problem then you will see results after the first restringing
#4
Low B strings on a 5 string are typically going to be a bit floppier than you're used to, if you've been playing 4 stringers. But yeah, put a little heavier string on there and it'll help a bit. Could go to a .140 or even .145.
#6
Quote by Spaz91
130 gauge is fine. Adjust your action and technique before you start buying shit.


This. Might also want to take a look at whatever you're playing your bass *through.*
Friend of mine bought a 5-string (he liked mine) and had exactly the same sentiment. It turned out he was hitting the B string waymuch harder than it needed, and that's because he couldn't hear it on his rig.

Bass takes power, and it takes cabinets that can actually reproduce the notes. To get the same volume as a note an octave above it, a bass needs four times the air movement. And most bass amps can't reproduce an open B (because their cabinets don't go low enough), so they hit it too hard. He brought his bass over, tried it out on my rig (and tried my bass at the same time) and started making plans to upgrade his rig.

That said, the reason for a five-string generally isn't to get lower. It's to allow you to stay in one spot for extended bass runs that would otherwise require you to move down the neck. I've actually been told that the reason I have a five string is to allow me to have an extended thumb rest for my four-string playing <G>.

One rig that I run is a 1500W bass head through a pair of fEARful 15/6/1 cabinets. The cabinets each include a single 15" Eminence Kappalite 3015LF neo-based speaker in cabinets specifically designed for that driver. The cone size isn't important (there are 12" and 10" versions that go just as low), but the cone excursion available is, and the speaker cabinet design is, and that combination happens to work with a low B on a five-string with no farting out.
#7
i'll try adjusting the action and shit. I'm playing through an acoustic 10 watt.
Listen to CKY.
#8
Quote by dspellman
This. Might also want to take a look at whatever you're playing your bass *through.*
Friend of mine bought a 5-string (he liked mine) and had exactly the same sentiment. It turned out he was hitting the B string waymuch harder than it needed, and that's because he couldn't hear it on his rig.

Bass takes power, and it takes cabinets that can actually reproduce the notes. To get the same volume as a note an octave above it, a bass needs four times the air movement. And most bass amps can't reproduce an open B (because their cabinets don't go low enough), so they hit it too hard. He brought his bass over, tried it out on my rig (and tried my bass at the same time) and started making plans to upgrade his rig.

That said, the reason for a five-string generally isn't to get lower. It's to allow you to stay in one spot for extended bass runs that would otherwise require you to move down the neck. I've actually been told that the reason I have a five string is to allow me to have an extended thumb rest for my four-string playing <G>.

One rig that I run is a 1500W bass head through a pair of fEARful 15/6/1 cabinets. The cabinets each include a single 15" Eminence Kappalite 3015LF neo-based speaker in cabinets specifically designed for that driver. The cone size isn't important (there are 12" and 10" versions that go just as low), but the cone excursion available is, and the speaker cabinet design is, and that combination happens to work with a low B on a five-string with no farting out.

This.

Also you need get to a amp that has a minimum of 100 watts.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#9
know anything about the Peavey Max 115 II? I mainly play guitar, so I don't wanna spend a ton of money on a bass amp
Listen to CKY.
#11
is it the sound or mostly the feel being affected?

i agree with spaz on not jumping the gun on a thicker gauge, but i'd recommend a restringing/proper set-up if you're using the stock strings. it can make a whole world of difference, even using the same gauge, if it's an instrument that's been sitting in a warehouse/music store for who knows how long
#12
Quote by cky_rocks
i'll try adjusting the action and shit. I'm playing through an acoustic 10 watt.


Well there's your answer. There's no way you'll hear a low B through that sort of amp. Probably time to invest in a new one.

Quote by cky_rocks
know anything about the Peavey Max 115 II? I mainly play guitar, so I don't wanna spend a ton of money on a bass amp


That sounds like a definite improvement yes. Old Peaveys are generally good value for money and virtually indestructible, but tend to be bulky and heavy, but if you're just using it in your room, you should be fine.
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Last edited by eddiehimself at Oct 13, 2014,
#13
Quote by cky_rocks
i'll try adjusting the action and shit. I'm playing through an acoustic 10 watt.


Yeah, that's an issue and a half right there. That amp will never reproduce the low B. I wouldn't even bother adjusting anything else until you get a real bass amp. That's probably the entire problem.