#1
Hello,
I've been playing the guitar for approximately 5 years. I never took personal lessons but just used the web.
I never really tried to be good, I stopped playing after I ran out of intermediate-level songs that I enjoyed. The length of the bunch of breaks, in total were, around 2 years (so technically I've been playing for only 3 years).
All I can do is play a quite a bit of songs on the ultimate-guitar top 100 tabs section.
I know sight-reading from my lessons in piano in elementary school. BUT I never used music sheet on guitar, just tabs. ONLY TABS ;(
I know chords, but I have no knowledge on scales.
I searched around the web and downloaded two books: the advancing guitarist and the modern method to guitar berklee edition.
I'm currently trying to read them (but they're boring as hell).
TLDR: Basically, I can play songs other people made, but I don't know anything about guitars for shit and can't improvise for shit nor have legitimate knowledge on scales, chords and music theory in general.
I honestly don't know how to move on. Your tips and advice would be greatly appreciated!
#2
A new amp would certainly improve your playing
Quote by lambofgod127
btw im in hs and im almost 18 so if u do think she was flirting with me dont say that its wrong im almost a grown man.




༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽ WE ARE ROB ༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽
#4
Honestly all I ever did with guitar was learn to play other people's music and take the bits and pieces I liked to influence writing my own songs.

I didn't get much better at writing music until I started tabbing out songs on my own and learning how to use my ears.

That's how I really learned my way around the fretboard.
#5
Quote by Amuro Jay
Honestly all I ever did with guitar was learn to play other people's music and take the bits and pieces I liked to influence writing my own songs.

I didn't get much better at writing music until I started tabbing out songs on my own and learning how to use my ears.

That's how I really learned my way around the fretboard.


This.
It wasn't until later that I started reading books and such on it, and I had a lot of "oh, that's what that thing I've been doing is called?" moments.

That being said, motivating yourself to read up at least a little bit on theory wouldn't hurt and would probably speed up the process. When I did so I sort of caught up to myself. I don't really know how else to put it.
You will also learn how to apply those things, whether you already knew them or not, in ways that might not have occured to you otherwise.

It wouldn't hurt to at least learn something here and there from other guitarists you know either. Even if it's just to improve your technique.

There are ways to learn without taking lessons in a "proper" sense, but you have to really apply yourself.
Last edited by Alcofuel at Oct 11, 2014,
#7
You need expensive gear, it'll definitely help. Why do you think all great guitar players have expensive gear?
If you're broke you can always invade a rock museum and steal the Pick of Destiny.
#8
when I cared about this I looked up modes and shit (lol) but all I really did was learn what notes are on the fretboard which frees up room to play/make better stuff than boring old pentatonic/blues
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#9
I don't see what the issue is here. It seems like you want to learn how to improvise, and expand your knowledge on theory and scales, so the next logical step would be to learn how to do that. There are so many resources, many of which can be found on the Internet for absolutely free.

Also, you might want to take this to the appropriate section: Guitar Techniques. It seems to me like you signed up to a website with loads of answers to your conundrum but didn't bother to look.

#11
game 2 sweater on the ice

return of the waffles?

this is so not the thread i was going for. i will live up to my mistakes and leave this.
#12
Get a guitar teacher to learn music theory. I've been playing for like 6 years and the beggining of 2014 I decided to take lessons because I had a basic understanding of how chords and scales work but I really wanted to go further to understand it 100 percent.
Marty Friedman+Jason Becker=Cacophony
#14
Watch Marty Friedman's melodic control. Read everything Freepower has stickied in guitar techniques/musician's talk. Pore over fretboard diagrams until you understand how Major/minor interact all over the fretboard, in every key.

PLAY OVER BACKING TRACKS

It's the only way you'll correlate your ear to what your hands are doing, aside from jamming with other people all the time.

Ted Greene's chord chemistry stuff will give you the theory, practicing will get you the rest of the way.
Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

DJENT!!
ಠ_ಠ
#15
I have the same question as the thread title, but I think a different application
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#16
Quote by Thrashtastic15
game 2 sweater on the ice

return of the waffles?

this is so not the thread i was going for. i will live up to my mistakes and leave this.





#19
What you need to do is get a macbook pro.
Gear:

ESP EC-50
ESP FB-204

MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby
MXR EVH Phase 90
MXR Analog Chorus

"Music is the strongest form of magic." - Marilyn Manson
#20
I'd recommend learning the first position of the minor pentatonic scale. If you haven't come across it yet it's not as scary as it sounds. It's just a 5 note sequence that repeats across the whole fretboard. The 1st position (of the 5 that you'll eventually want to learn if you want free reign of the neck) is just a way of learning and visualising these scale patterns more easily.
The Am pentatonic scale, for example, uses the notes; A, C, D, E, G before returning to the root/tonic note of A. Find a fretboard diagram (online) of the 1st position minor pentatonic scale so you can visualise it properly.
Once you've learnt this, try picking small sections of the scale (groups of 3 - 4 notes) and experiment with them over backing tracks (there's hundreds on YouTube). Use slides, bends, vibrato, hammer ons and pull offs to really try and make those few notes sing and not sound like a scale. Think about phrasing/rhythm/timing as well as note choice. It's easier said than done to begin with but persist and you'll quickly start to have fun with it.
Good luck!
#22
Go down to the crossroads at midnight, and get the devil to tune your guitar.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#24
Quote by othereffect
Hello,
I've been playing the guitar for approximately 5 years. I never took personal lessons but just used the web.
I never really tried to be good, I stopped playing after I ran out of intermediate-level songs that I enjoyed. The length of the bunch of breaks, in total were, around 2 years (so technically I've been playing for only 3 years).
All I can do is play a quite a bit of songs on the ultimate-guitar top 100 tabs section.
I know sight-reading from my lessons in piano in elementary school. BUT I never used music sheet on guitar, just tabs. ONLY TABS ;(
I know chords, but I have no knowledge on scales.
I searched around the web and downloaded two books: the advancing guitarist and the modern method to guitar berklee edition.
I'm currently trying to read them (but they're boring as hell).
TLDR: Basically, I can play songs other people made, but I don't know anything about guitars for shit and can't improvise for shit nor have legitimate knowledge on scales, chords and music theory in general.
I honestly don't know how to move on. Your tips and advice would be greatly appreciated!


I think you need a good teacher, dude. It sounds like you don't have enough individual motivation at the moment to make all this progress on your own, so maybe you need some outside help and influence. There's nothing wrong with that. I was lucky enough to have two awesome and very different teachers when I was a younger -- a college classical guitar student and a middle aged jazz guitarist, both of whom taught me a lot and helped me to develop.

Alternatively, you can learn a different way; do some music discovery to find some guitar tunes and styles you like and that are challenging, and then develop just by learning those songs and the techniques involved as opposed to using a method, such as in a book. Not that there's anything wrong with that either.
My God, it's full of stars!