#1
Does anyone have any tips for sliding full chords? I can slide individual notes just fine, but whenever I try to slide a full chord it starts to lose shape and it stops ringing out clearly. As an example here is a riff from a song that uses them (Tame Impala - Flow):

e|-----------------|
B|-3--3-3-1/3-1----|
G|-4--4-4-2/4-2----| x8
D|-5--5-5-3/5-3----|
A|-5--5-5-3/5-3----|
E|-----------------|


I've tried searching for tips or lessons on this but it's hard to find anything because anytime you use the words "guitar" and "slide" in a search it brings up a bunch of slide guitar stuff.
#2
It's all about practice really. That's a very common technique and in time you'll wonder how you ever struggled with it. I know no-one ever likes hearing people tell them to just practice but it's pretty much the only thing you can do. If it really concerns you that much though then perhaps post a video of yourself playing that section and you might get some more specific advice.

Edit: if I were playing that section I would use my index finger as a bar, just like playing a barre chord. Generally I find that if i can use my index finger as a bar then i almost always will. It essentially acts as a sort of anchor and a guide for your other 3 fingers. It locks them in position so they don't slide everywhere. It's kind of hard to articulate what I'm saying, but i know there are MANY others who do the same and perhaps they can better articulate what I'm getting at.
Last edited by vayne92 at Oct 12, 2014,
#3
Quote by vayne92
...[ ]....Edit: if I were playing that section I would use my index finger as a bar, just like playing a barre chord. Generally I find that if i can use my index finger as a bar then i almost always will. It essentially acts as a sort of anchor and a guide for your other 3 fingers. It locks them in position so they don't slide everywhere. It's kind of hard to articulate what I'm saying, but i know there are MANY others who do the same and perhaps they can better articulate what I'm getting at.
To add to this, your wrist needs to remain in the same relative angle and position as you slide up or down the neck.

To put it another way, if when you made the first chord you wrist was at a true right angle to the neck, then it needs to be at that very same angle when it gets to where it's going.

If you change that angle, that's what changes the shape of your finger pattern.

It also takes quite a bit more pressure than you think on the fingerboard, to keep the sustain going through the slide.

Some shapes are easier to slide than others. Basically any open chord shape is moveable, to a degree. You need to finger pick in some cases, to avoid open strings causing dissonance.

It almost goes without saying, the technique will be easiest to pull off, (no pun intended), with an electric, somewhat more difficult with an acoustic, and nigh on impossible with a 12 string. (At least for we mortal players)
#4
Thanks to both of you for the advice.

It did make a difference by focusing on keeping my wrist at the exact same angle. I think part of it is just not being used to having to push down so hard either. It seems to take a lot more pressure to slide chords than just play them. I guess the same is probably true of single string slides, but I just became used to it. I still am nowhere near playing it well, but at least now I know I am hopefully practicing the right way. That was my biggest concern really, since I couldn't find a single video demonstrating it.

Interesting idea to use a barre for those chords too. I wouldn't have thought of that, but it does actually make a lot of sense. I'm much more used to moving barre chords around than other chords, albeit not sliding them.
Last edited by bptrav at Oct 12, 2014,
#5
Remember the 3 P's...

Practice


Practice


Practice

Start with simple chords, like an open D, C or A chord, just 3 strings. Work on that, get it to where you can do it well and still keep it a distinct chord, then move into chords that require more strings.

Most people do use more pressure than required to make most chords, which sometimes leads to intonation problems because you're pushing the strings so hard you push some notes sharp. Learning to slide chords will help that too because you can't use as much pressure when you slide a whole chord. One of my guitars, a Peavey Patriot, is really touchy about that so I have to be careful with it. I have no idea why, it's set up the same as my Squier Strat, almost identical, but it tends to go out of tune easier if I chord too heavy. So that guitar made me start easing up on the pressure...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...