#2
I'm not sure exactly what you mean, care to elaborate?

The main difference for guitar is that you can play middle C in many areas of the fretboard, instead of just having one piano key for middle C. Middle C can be found on the B string first fret, D string fifth fret, A string fifteenth fret and low e string twentieth fret. The main difference is that depending on which of these you choose to play you get different tone out of the guitar, because the strings vary in thickness.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#3
I think the guitar is played one octave lower than written or some goofy thing like that.
#4
The guitar is a transposing instrument. Sheet music for the guitar is written an octave higher than it sounds. That's indicated by the little 8 under the treble clef. It makes the range of the guitar fit neatly on the treble clef, without having to use lots of ledger lines.

Other examples of transposing instruments are the trumpet and the saxophone, and the tenor voice.
#5
Quote by JeffreyBDePuy
I know this is probably a dumb question. But how and why is middle c different for guitars?


It's one octave lower.

The reason is that it's much easier to read music that way. If you wrote middle C properly on a staff, it'd be below the treble clef, and it's much easier to read and write down music that's on the clef rather than music where large parts of it are above or below the clef.
#6
Quote by Jack Strat
I think the guitar is played one octave lower than written or some goofy thing like that.


Ah alright now i understand what you mean.

Yeah, sheet music for us is like the other guys mentioned so it is easier for us to read, otherwise we would be reading ledger lines all day.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#8
BTW, do you guys know why guitar isn't written on a bass clef? I mean, the notes would fit a normal bass clef pretty well (the low E string would be on the first ledger line below the staff). Or is it just a tradition?
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#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
BTW, do you guys know why guitar isn't written on a bass clef? I mean, the notes would fit a normal bass clef pretty well (the low E string would be on the first ledger line below the staff). Or is it just a tradition?


I remember reading about it when we were studying different eras of orchestral music (classical, baroque, renaissance), but i can't quite remember. I am fairly certain it comes with tradition from classical guitar though, but don't quote me on that.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
BTW, do you guys know why guitar isn't written on a bass clef? I mean, the notes would fit a normal bass clef pretty well (the low E string would be on the first ledger line below the staff). Or is it just a tradition?


Just for ease of reading. Also, the guitar was primarily an amateur instrument, and more people were familiar with the treble clef. Some theorists proposed using the grand staff for guitar music, and, indeed, some published guitar music was printed that way. Originally, only tablature was used for lute and guitar. Baritone sax is technically a bass instrument but treble clef is used for that as well. It just comes down to practicality.