#1
I have the Yamaha Pacifica 112j guitar for 2 weeks with the Roland micro cube amp, problem is im trying to play Fade to Black by Metallica and it doesn't sound good, I tried to use a several channels, tried to change gain and tone knobs and still, it doesn't sound as same in the song...
My amp doesn't have treble, bass or mid knobs, maybe it's kinda related to that? so that was a mistake buying that amp?
Which pickup should I have to use to play solos?

Help would be appreciated.
#2
I suppose both but amp is the main cause I would think.

Keep your lead pickup on. Depending on what you spent on the amp it would be a mistake...amps are fairly expensive and its hard to really distinguish what to look for when youre a beginner.

I suggest saving up for a new amp..You can get some decent ones for a couple hundred bucks that will sound a lot better and closer to what you're looking for.
#3
Have you only been playing for two weeks or did you play for a while before you got this gear?

if you've only been playing for two weeks, saying the guitar and amp don't sound right are a bit like saying, "these new golf clubs I got are faulty, I've only been playing for two weeks and I haven't won the Open yet".

That's not to say that you can't be using unsuitable gear (or even unsuitable settings) either. You have a beginner level guitar and amp- you chose pretty well, though, you have one of the best beginner guitars and amps available. So in that respect I'd say you picked really, really well. But still, it's not going to sound as good as metallica who use gear which costs thousands upon thousands of dollars, and that's before you even consider studio trickery in the recording.

You should still be able to get pretty close, though.

The intro sounds to me like maybe an acoustic alongside a fairly clean electric (see it's already going to be hard to nail that exactly because there are two parts).

Try the acoustic sim, JC clean (I think, but I could be wrong, Metallica has used Roland Jazz Chorus amps for cleans quite frequently) and black panel models- all of those should do decent cleans, it's just a matter of whichever you think sounds best. Start with the tone knob at 12 o'clock and see how it sounds with those models (not having treble, middle and bass knobs shouldn't be a massive problem, each of the amp models should sound broadly the way you want even without them). Try a little chorus and delay or reverb as well as that may help the cleans to sound like the record.

The intro solo sounds (I think) like a neck pickup. Try the classic stack setting for it- you might have to put the gain control at or near maximum to get enough gain. if it's not enough, try the R-fier stack setting. I'd probably set some delay on that setting too (or maybe reverb, to a certain extent you have to use your ears, which is difficult when you're new).

The verse bit seems broadly similar to the intro, but the clean-ish electric guitar seems to be a bit more prominent, and the playing contains more "digging in" (which makes it a little more distorted). I'd probably try the black panel model, or even the brit combo (vox ac30 model) or classic stack models, with the gain set fairly low (but enough for a little bit of overdrive when you dig in). I'd probably use the bridge pickup. You could maybe use a little reverb if you wanted, but it's not totally necessary, and you may prefer the tone without it.

right, then the brootal riffing bit. Bridge pickup. R-fier stack setting. Gain set high enough to get a real chug, and tone set high enough to get some bite, but not too high so it all goes to fizz.

first solo sounds broadly similar to the intro solo so use the same settings

main solo has a bit more gain than the intro and first solos, and I'd use the bridge pickup for that. Probably the r-fier setting, but the classic stack setting might be worth a try with the gain turned well up, in case it has enough gain and it should be a bit softer-sounding than the r-fier setting which might suit it better. as with the other solos, some delay (or reverb if you prefer it) will help it to sound more professional.

in all cases have your guitar's volume and tone controls up full, by the way.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Oct 12, 2014,
#4
Guitar isn't bad. Amp is a small practice amp. You can waste money on different guitar parts and pedals and still won't get the sound you're looking for. Tone comes mostly from your amp, dude. Get a good tube amp and be done with it. Any decent guitar will sound great on it.
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#5
Quote by Dave_Mc
Have you only been playing for two weeks or did you play for a while before you got this gear?

if you've only been playing for two weeks, saying the guitar and amp don't sound right are a bit like saying, "these new golf clubs I got are faulty, I've only been playing for two weeks and I haven't won the Open yet".

That's not to say that you can't be using unsuitable gear (or even unsuitable settings) either. You have a beginner level guitar and amp- you chose pretty well, though, you have one of the best beginner guitars and amps available. So in that respect I'd say you picked really, really well. But still, it's not going to sound as good as metallica who use gear which costs thousands upon thousands of dollars, and that's before you even consider studio trickery in the recording.

You should still be able to get pretty close, though.

The intro sounds to me like maybe an acoustic alongside a fairly clean electric (see it's already going to be hard to nail that exactly because there are two parts).

Try the acoustic sim, JC clean (I think, but I could be wrong, Metallica has used Roland Jazz Chorus amps for cleans quite frequently) and black panel models- all of those should do decent cleans, it's just a matter of whichever you think sounds best. Start with the tone knob at 12 o'clock and see how it sounds with those models (not having treble, middle and bass knobs shouldn't be a massive problem, each of the amp models should sound broadly the way you want even without them). Try a little chorus and delay or reverb as well as that may help the cleans to sound like the record.

The intro solo sounds (I think) like a neck pickup. Try the classic stack setting for it- you might have to put the gain control at or near maximum to get enough gain. if it's not enough, try the R-fier stack setting. I'd probably set some delay on that setting too (or maybe reverb, to a certain extent you have to use your ears, which is difficult when you're new).

The verse bit seems broadly similar to the intro, but the clean-ish electric guitar seems to be a bit more prominent, and the playing contains more "digging in" (which makes it a little more distorted). I'd probably try the black panel model, or even the brit combo (vox ac30 model) or classic stack models, with the gain set fairly low (but enough for a little bit of overdrive when you dig in). I'd probably use the bridge pickup. You could maybe use a little reverb if you wanted, but it's not totally necessary, and you may prefer the tone without it.

right, then the brootal riffing bit. Bridge pickup. R-fier stack setting. Gain set high enough to get a real chug, and tone set high enough to get some bite, but not too high so it all goes to fizz.

first solo sounds broadly similar to the intro solo so use the same settings

main solo has a bit more gain than the intro and first solos, and I'd use the bridge pickup for that. Probably the r-fier setting, but the classic stack setting might be worth a try with the gain turned well up, in case it has enough gain and it should be a bit softer-sounding than the r-fier setting which might suit it better. as with the other solos, some delay (or reverb if you prefer it) will help it to sound more professional.

in all cases have your guitar's volume and tone controls up full, by the way.


Thanks dude, it helped, but of course its not close too much like in the song,
but yeah probably it's the amp, i guess that next time im buying a new amp i'll choose a decent one.
Last edited by gabisimonov at Oct 13, 2014,
#6
^ yeah to a certain extent you have to be realistic with your expectations with a small amp like the microcube. that being said, I'd say it is a decent amp for what it is. It's a handy amp to have (being portable and versatile), even after you get "better" and bigger amps. for example I got a vox mini3 fairly recently (which is more or less vox's take on a microcube type of amp), even though I have bigger amps, since it's pretty useful to have something small which you can carry about (or play through when learning songs/practising).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ yeah to a certain extent you have to be realistic with your expectations with a small amp like the microcube. that being said, I'd say it is a decent amp for what it is. It's a handy amp to have (being portable and versatile), even after you get "better" and bigger amps. for example I got a vox mini3 fairly recently (which is more or less vox's take on a microcube type of amp), even though I have bigger amps, since it's pretty useful to have something small which you can carry about (or play through when learning songs/practising).


For the solo I use the neck pickup and my wah on full treble position (and leave it there, Jimmy Page style). I read an interview with Kirk somewhere, he talked about this.

edit: “I was still using my black Flying V on Ride the Lightning, but ‘Fade to Black’ sounds different—it has a warmer sound—because I used the neck pickup and played through a wah-wah pedal all the way in the ‘up’ position,” says Kirk Hammett.

http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-24-fade-black-kirk-hammett

He also says it reminds him of the Dire Straits.
Phrases Label
The Bohemes
---
The White Strat w/Dimebucker
Tokai Explorer Korina
Ibanez RG570 Purple Neon
Gibson Les Paul Deluxe Ebony
Fender Telecaster Apple Red
Dano '59 Burgundy
Ibanez Artcore AM-73
Last edited by bornfidelity at Oct 13, 2014,