#1
At the moment, I have my setup like this:

Guitar -> Tuner -> Overdrive -> Tubescreamer 1 -> Tubescreamer 2 -> Wah -> Phaser -> Delay -> Amp

The second tubescreamer is set up as a boost (Gain down, Volume all the way up, Tone all the way up), yet I wonder if there's a better way to achieve a volume boost for solos. Please, share your best suggestions (this includes buying new gear), but I prefer not to have anything in the amp's FX Loop, because that would make a messy stage set-up, since there's already 2 cables running from the pedalboard to the amp.

Thanks in advance
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#2
I haven't personally tried this, but I read somewhere that something you could try is to turn your guitar's volume down and compensate by turning the volume on your amp up. When it comes time for a boost, all you need to do is roll the guitar's volume back up. You could try it. Other than that, all I can suggest is looking for a gain booster like this:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/MicroAmp.
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#3
The best way to achieve this is putting a boost in the FX loop. Buying different stuff isn't going to yield significantly different results if you're not willing to use the loop.

Once you've overdriven the preamp, you're done boosting the volume. That's the whole point of the fx loop, to let you add effects or boosts after the preamp distortion. There is no clean boost in the world that can retroactively make an overdriven preamp clean again. As mentioned above, you can always make your default volume lower, but in the context of boosts, there's a hard wall once your preamp is saturated.

So my suggestion is getting some zip ties to manage your cables, bite the bullet, and put a boost pedal in the loop.
#4
^ +1

Or just put up with what you already have.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#5
Quote by SexyBeast810
I haven't personally tried this, but I read somewhere that something you could try is to turn your guitar's volume down and compensate by turning the volume on your amp up. When it comes time for a boost, all you need to do is roll the guitar's volume back up.


That's not gonna fly around here, because it makes entirely too much sense. And, of course, because it actually works. Should be noted that people have been doing this since DOT (Dawn Of Time).

On the other hand, if you always play at the full available volume of your amp (look down at your guitar and see if someone has glued your guitar volume and tone in the "dimed" position), you're somewhat screwed.

There are other options. I have a Chandler Tone-X built into one of my guitars. It's like a parked wah; it's an active sweepable mids boost (about 16 dB) on a push-pull. By modifying the TONE of the guitar, it helps cut through the mud of the rest of the band.
#6
An EQ in the loop works wonders like the MXR 10 band or a simple boost like TCs spark in the loop will the do the same thing. I reccomend the EQ because you can boost the mids and get a dB boost to really cut through on lead lines.

And as for pulling the volume back and turning it up for solos on your guitar. This doesn't work for pretty much any style of metal because you lose a lot of high end when you do that. I'm not sure what you play though.
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#7
^ You don't necessarily if you put a treble bleed cap in there (or one of the slightly more involved cap/resistor versions). if you're not careful you can go the other way though and make things too thin.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
So, if I'm using the FX-loop, I can just as well throw half my pedalboard in there, right?

Would this setup be alright?

Guitar -> Tuner -> Overdrive -> Tubescreamer 1 -> Wah -> Pre-Amp
(FX Loop) -> Tubescreamer 2 (the booster) -> Phaser -> Delay -> Power Amp

Thanks for your replies!
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#10
That should be fine. At that point the actual order of pedals comes down to personal preference. For instance I like to put my wah in front of any of any distortions/overdrives, whether it be the amp or a pedal, because that's just the sound I like. Whereas some other people prefer the wah in the effects loop before the delay.
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