#1
Hi, i was doing the 2 string bend on Samba pa ti and i hear that the sound was utterly shit... I looked arround the guit. and noticed that my neck was slightly bended or twiseted QQ. Is there a fix for this?

I dont know from what fret it starts exatcly to bend but all i know that from the 12 fret up to 3-4 fret its kinda weird looking...





#2
That's actually kinda normal. It's called neck relief. You need some neck relief to reduce fret buzz on the first 10 frets or so. It looks like you have a little bit too much, but how much you need depends on your playing style.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#3
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
That's actually kinda normal. It's called neck relief. You need some neck relief to reduce fret buzz on the first 10 frets or so. It looks like you have a little bit too much, but how much you need depends on your playing style.


I would like to straighten it but im not shure if i can fk something up with the truss rod...
I have an jackson js20 too and the neck is dead straight, and i find it much easier to play on that then on the guitar from the pics.
Last edited by emirvai at Oct 14, 2014,
#4
If you have a ruler that measures 64ths of an inch or millimeters you can tighten the truss rod (under the plate on the headstock) until the distance from the lowest string to the 7th fret is about 3-4/64ths of an inch or about 2mm.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#5
Bring it to a shop.
Quote by Shredwizard445
Go ahead and spend your money, I don't care. It won't make you sound better.


Quote by Shredwizard445
Sure upgrading your gear will make you sound better.


#6
There's really nothing to be afraid of when adjusting truss rod (it's one of the most basic things when it comes to guitar set up). Just don't overdo it. 1/8 or 1/4 of a turn at the time and you'll be fine (and 1/8 or 1/4 of a turn will most likely be enough).

You don't want your neck to be dead straight. You want it to have just a bit of relief. Otherwise you may get some low fret buzz. With the straightest possible neck (without buzz), you'll get the lowest possible action.

If you want your neck to have less relief, you just need to adjust the truss rod. There's no other way to fix it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
a little quick test you can do is hold the string down on the 12 fret and check for some play between the string and 6th fret ....... should be around .020 ish air gap at the 6th fret and string , if it has more or none then a neck adjustment is in order , the neck needs to be bowed a little , like mentioned a 1/4 turn max either way , a little goes along way
#8
Quote by Mephaphil
Bring it to a shop.


Truss rod adjustment is the most basic thing you can do, and is very easy if you do it right.

I have a setup book written by a trained guitar tech. Lowest string should be 3-4/64th of an inch off the 7th fret (depending one what kind of relief/action you like), assuming the neck isn't twisted. In that case you're boned.

Doing anything by eye without an exact measurement is just improper, and can lead to hard-to-reverse errors.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
Last edited by TheStig1214 at Oct 14, 2014,
#9
In playing position, put a capo at the first fret. Fret it around the area where the neck joins the body, 12th to 14th fret usually. Check with feeler gauges at the 7th to 8th fret. My preferred neck relief is in the .010" to .012" range.

You will feel a slight drag on the feeler gauge when you find the actual measurement. It's not critical, a couple of thousandths either way won't kill anyone. The neck relief you want depends on your action and playing style. People who play low action will need a little more neck relief, I keep my action fairly high so I can play slide too so if mine gets as low as .005" I can still live with it, but I try to keep it around .010". If you play hard, you'll need plenty, if you have a light touch the neck can be flatter.

If you have more than .010" neck relief at the 7th fret, tighten the truss rod, no more than 1/4 turn, and let it sit overnight to "settle in"...the wood does not immediately react to adjustments, it takes a while.

No more than 1/4 turn at a time, and let it sit overnight to settle in. Tighten (clockwise) to make the neck straighter and reduce the neck relief, looser (counter-clockwise) to allow more neck relief. You can play it immediately, but don't expect it to conform to the adjustment right away, it takes time.

The reason for this adjustment...strings vibrate in a pattern similar to a jump rope. Wider vibrational pattern in the middle, almost none at the nut and bridge. The neck needs room for that vibration in the middle, so the truss rod was designed to allow some neck relief.

Climate and humidity changes can and will affect the shape of the neck over time, I usually check mine once or twice a year but usually don't have to make any adjustments more than once every 3 or 4 years, they seem to stay in fairly good shape. If you're traveling all over the country, you might have to adjust 3 or 4 times a year.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Quote by emirvai
I would like to straighten it but im not shure if i can fk something up with the truss rod...
I have an jackson js20 too and the neck is dead straight, and i find it much easier to play on that then on the guitar from the pics.

Provided you understand what a truss rod actually does, you know how to adjust it properly, and you have the correct size of allen wrench, you cannot mess anything up. A truss rod adjustment is a rudimentary part of a guitar's set up and as such, it isn't something people should be afraid of adjusting.

Measuring neck relief is straightforward. Feeler gauges aren't something you necessarily need, it just allows you to measure neck relief a bit more accurately. 0.5mm of neck relief at the 7th fret is acceptable for most people, but how much you should really have depends on your playing style. The only way to really know what is right for you is by experimenting with different amounts of relief.

Don't take the guitar to a tech. Adjusting the truss rod is rudimentary. You need to know how to do these things yourself and paying somebody to do it for you isn't going to teach you anything.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#11
Thx guys for fast responses. I dont even have a guitar tech near me.. so to straighten the slightly bowed neck i need to rotate the rod clockwise or counter clockwise? :s
#12
Clockwise tightens. Anticlockwise loosens. In the playing position, that translates to turning the Allen wrench towards you to tighten it (assuming you're playing a right-handed guitar).

Tighten the truss rod 1/4 turn and see what happens.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 15, 2014,
#13
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Clockwise tightens. Anticlockwise loosens. In the playing position, that translates to turning the Allen wrench towards you to tighten it (assuming you're playing a right-handed guitar).

Tighten the truss rod 1/4 turn and see what happens.


U really helped me a lot. After 2 x 1/4 turns my neck straightened alot its almost deadstraight just like i wanted it. I didnt measure anything, i only ckecked after few hours how it feels to play
#14
Nice work mate. Trussrods arent the devil - impatient people are.
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.