#2
Quite a lot of good instructional material on YouTube and other sources, but for basics...

There are basically two styles of playing. The first is more like what Allman and other rockers were/are doing... Playing single-note lines with the slide instead of the fingers. Basically, the same kind of scalar patterns you'd use in soloing.
The important thing being to damp out the non-played strings and to accurately place the slide over the top of the fret.

Then, there's the traditional "bottleneck blues" style, the popular Delta-style playing which is accompaniment for singing. In this, open tunings are the norm, and the player usually plays fingerstyle, throwing in little licks and riffs while using the slide to cover the typical blues progression.
Again, placement of the slide, clean picking of the notes, proper damping, and a good rhythmic feel are all important.
Usually, for playing slide, you want a higher action and heavier strings, so that the slide won't whack the frets.

Slides can be almost anything; glass, brass, steel, bone..... Fun to experiment.
#3
Quote by Bikewer
There are basically two styles of playing. The first is more like what Allman and other rockers were/are doing... Playing single-note lines with the slide instead of the fingers. Basically, the same kind of scalar patterns you'd use in soloing.

Long past that
Quote by Bikewer
The important thing being to damp out the non-played strings and to accurately place the slide over the top of the fret.

done
Quote by Bikewer
Then, there's the traditional "bottleneck blues" style, the popular Delta-style playing which is accompaniment for singing. In this, open tunings are the norm, and the player usually plays fingerstyle, throwing in little licks and riffs while using the slide to cover the typical blues progression.

There's the problem
I'm mostly just playing arpeggios and it's kind of boring. More individual notes outside of chords might help
Quote by Bikewer
Again, placement of the slide, clean picking of the notes, proper damping, and a good rhythmic feel are all important.

Already done.
Quote by Bikewer
Usually, for playing slide, you want a higher action and heavier strings, so that the slide won't whack the frets.

Resonator guitar so no problems there.
Quote by Bikewer
Slides can be almost anything; glass, brass, steel, bone..... Fun to experiment.

Have a few homemade brass ones and a glass one.

Thanks for the help.
#4
It's just a lot of practice and listening very carefully to the styles you want to emulate. I use the slide on my pinky, and fretting notes behind the slide is a big component of my style. Have a listen to "Scarborough Fur" in the Soundclick link in my sig.

One of my heroes is Fred McDowell, who managed to get an awful lot out of single note slide:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54GNI2K3-ec


If you aren't a fingerpicker, Roy Rogers is well worth listening to:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NW08Rc802MQ

In both cases, it is as much about expression as the notes being played. I'm a fingerpicker, working on developing a style that emulates flatpicking, to try and get the best of both worlds.
#5
^ I'm trying to style my playing sort of like Ry Cooder, especially like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7w9ATqhbmk

I couldn't find the album recording of his version of "13 Question Method" but I'm working on a variation of that

I don't use flat picks on anything but electric guitar anymore, just fingers.

And those two examples are great, I really like Fred McDowell and Roy Rogers.
#7
Metal slides generally sound louder. Brass, steel, and copper are all popular, particularly for acoustic slide players.
But glass is harder than metal (yes, it can be!) and is more popular with electric players.
Ceramic slides also have their own fans.
Slides are not the same. Standard cut, slant cut, bull nose, bull nose with slant, double cut… Slides, like picks, come in many different guises.
Metal slides generally produce a warmer tone.
Glass gives a sharper zone.
Higher strings are easier to play than bass strings. You knew that already.
#8
If, as you've indicated, you've already mastered the basics (not the impression you gave with your initial post....)then you can take it up a notch by listening to some of the contemporary slide masters.

I recommend Bob Brozman, who was a stellar blues player but also a musical polymath who played just about anything you can think of... Ragtime, early jazz, "world" music of many kinds....
He still has a web page up and there are a lot of instructional materials available. I've got his basic Delta Blues DVD and it's excellent.
Another fine player is Roy Rogers (not the "King Of The Cowboys"....)who plays in a more modern style.

For something a little "outside", you might try some of the earlier recordings of Leo Kottke and John Fahey, both of whom used 12-string guitars extensively as well as a variety of alternate tunings and other effects.
#9
Quote by Bikewer
If, as you've indicated, you've already mastered the basics (not the impression you gave with your initial post....)then you can take it up a notch by listening to some of the contemporary slide masters.

I recommend Bob Brozman, who was a stellar blues player but also a musical polymath who played just about anything you can think of... Ragtime, early jazz, "world" music of many kinds....
He still has a web page up and there are a lot of instructional materials available. I've got his basic Delta Blues DVD and it's excellent.
Another fine player is Roy Rogers (not the "King Of The Cowboys"....)who plays in a more modern style.

For something a little "outside", you might try some of the earlier recordings of Leo Kottke and John Fahey, both of whom used 12-string guitars extensively as well as a variety of alternate tunings and other effects.

I'll check those out. And I can't believe I forgot Leo Kottke.

Tanks much
#10
Let's not forget Rory Gallagher

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LlCOstNZqI

and Johnny Winter

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvNUTqDJJaI

And Kim Simmonds of Savoy Brown

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZM8z_jF8Os

There are others, I can't think right now though...listening to Savoy Brown...

The song that got me into slide though, was Statesboro Blues, by the Allman Brothers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezPZxfS1jys
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...