#1
I'm a beginner and I like playing/trying to learn lead metal guitar. So I have to do lots of picking and muting and so on. When I play a solo I rest my picking hand on the strings above the string that I am playing to mute them. But what happens when I want to play the lower/thicker E string and I want to rest my picking hand to get better accuracy but not palm mute/mute it at the same time? I mean above the lower/thicker E string there are no strings left to rest my hand on! So where do I rest the picking hand when I play that string or the other thicker strings without palm muting them or muting them by mistake? Do I rest my hand on the bridge only?
Last edited by Zerpent93 at Oct 16, 2014,
#3
^ Don't do that, anchoring your pinky on the higher strings/below the strings is a bad idea and will usually cause excess tension in your picking hand. Before someone posts about the minority of professional guitarists who do this, you can make it work but it is much less work to not anchor and learn how to pick properly. That is definitely a bad habit.

Depending on how you hold the pick you could possibly touch the bridge lightly with the rest of your hand on the strings just below the low E, but honestly it'll probably be a lot better for you in the long run to just get used to floating your hand. At some point your picking arm will be resting somewhere on the body of the guitar, so you will have some stability from that.

Make sure you are only lightly touching the strings with your picking hand when picking the other strings by the way; you don't want to be pressing into the strings or guitar with your hand since this causes excess tension.
#4
Quote by Anon17
^ Don't do that, anchoring your pinky on the higher strings/below the strings is a bad idea and will usually cause excess tension in your picking hand. Before someone posts about the minority of professional guitarists who do this, you can make it work but it is much less work to not anchor and learn how to pick properly. That is definitely a bad habit.

Depending on how you hold the pick you could possibly touch the bridge lightly with the rest of your hand on the strings just below the low E, but honestly it'll probably be a lot better for you in the long run to just get used to floating your hand. At some point your picking arm will be resting somewhere on the body of the guitar, so you will have some stability from that.

Make sure you are only lightly touching the strings with your picking hand when picking the other strings by the way; you don't want to be pressing into the strings or guitar with your hand since this causes excess tension.


I play with a closed hand/fist. When I play at the low E/thick E string I angle my fist so that I sort of rest the pinky and ring finger on the A- and D strings. This is good right? Why would this cause extra tension? I'm just angling my hand/fist the other way slightly to do this so that the knuckles of my pinky and ring finger rest on the A- and D strings.
Last edited by Zerpent93 at Oct 24, 2014,
#5
If the knuckles of those fingers are lightly brushing (but not resting) on those strings it's fine. If you are resting them on those strings you are anchoring which is bad, I really can't be bothered to type up yet another anchoring post so just search "anchoring" on this forum for the reasons why it's bad.

Basically, it's a lot easier to move your wrist with minimal tension and movement if your hand isn't "stuck" to the strings by fingers/knuckles/whatever resting on them. You can make it work but it will be a lot harder and take more time, so it's really not worth it unless you are stuck in the habit after thousands of hours of practice like John Petrucci.
#6
Quote by Anon17
If the knuckles of those fingers are lightly brushing (but not resting) on those strings it's fine. If you are resting them on those strings you are anchoring which is bad, I really can't be bothered to type up yet another anchoring post so just search "anchoring" on this forum for the reasons why it's bad.

Basically, it's a lot easier to move your wrist with minimal tension and movement if your hand isn't "stuck" to the strings by fingers/knuckles/whatever resting on them. You can make it work but it will be a lot harder and take more time, so it's really not worth it unless you are stuck in the habit after thousands of hours of practice like John Petrucci.


I see. I will definately think about this when I play and practice. I will try not to rest the knuckles too hard on the strings. I will probably just use my knuckles to mute the strings and to feel where my hand is. Thanks for all help.
#7
Yeah don't worry about your knuckles/fingers brushing the strings, it's only when they make proper contact (pushing into the strings or getting caught as you pick) that it becomes an issue.

As long as you aren't pushing your knuckles into the strings you'll be okay. The low E string with no palm muting will probably be a little harder to pick at first but you get used to it.

EDIT - Tried this out quickly, if you are lightly resting your knuckles on the strings when you are picking the low E it is okay since you aren't inducing any tension. If you are actually using this as an anchoring point and/or pressing into the strings you might want to consider changing your technique.
Last edited by Anon17 at Oct 25, 2014,