#1
Hi everyone,

First time poster , so please go easy on me if I'm posting in the wrong location...

I've been playing/practicing on a Fender Mustang III v2 amp. I've got a few 'patches' that I really like but they have lots of reverb on them.

My question is this: For the first time I'll be performing in a gym (one basketball court, with stands), so I don't know if I should turn the reverb off and play 'dry'. I know reverb 'simulates' larger rooms, but if I play in a gym, would the reverb sound 'bad' if I leave the same settings as I do when I practice in my basement? Should I just turn it down, or play 'dry'...? They have a PA system and they will mic the amp, so not sure if this matters or not.

Your feedback would be most welcome

thanks in advance
iamthehub
#2
Your whole rig can sound different in different spaces. It is a skill to be able to hear what you should alter depending on the place you are playing. Speaking to the sound engineer is a usually a good idea as they will (generally) know how the space sounds front of house.

But, to answer your question, you may want to reduce the amount of reverb or turn it off to compensate for the room you are playing in, but reverb can also be a stylistic choice and turning it all the way off could lose the sound you are aiming for.

Also, welcome to the forums. This would probably be better placed in the Guitar Gear & Accessories forum, or possibly the Band Leading forum. Let the mods decide though
#3
I personally like a slight reverb tail to give it fullness without being boomy. The same with delay. A little adds a nice versatile nuance to your tone. I tend to be a straight throught he amp kind of player, and don't use nearly the effects like I once did. I also love the BBB Sonic Stomp, and use it for almost everything.

Best,

Sean
#4
Reverb can be used "as an effect" too. It depends on your purpose of using reverb. But I would say don't use too much of it. I would guess lots of reverb can make you sound really muddy. But it also depends on what kind of stuff you play. Some music just needs reverb. It's part of the sound. Reverb doesn't just simulate a large room (though there are certain reverb effects that do that). It depends on the reverb but for example spring reverb sounds nothing like playing in a large room.

If you only want to simulate a large room with your reverb, I would say turn it down. But if it's an important part of your sound (and more of an "effect"), leave it the way it is. For example surf music just needs that spring reverb sound.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Thanks guys for the quick responses... The kind of sound I'm looking for is like a John Mayer "Slow Dancing in a Burning Room" sound. I think I'll need to turn down the reverb, but not totally off, as I believe to get that sound, I'll need reverb.

I'll see if I can speak to the sound engineer prior, just to see what he suggests. Looking forward to seeing how I sound

Thanks again everyone
#6
Quote by iamthehub
Hi everyone,

First time poster , so please go easy on me if I'm posting in the wrong location...

I've been playing/practicing on a Fender Mustang III v2 amp. I've got a few 'patches' that I really like but they have lots of reverb on them.

My question is this: For the first time I'll be performing in a gym (one basketball court, with stands), so I don't know if I should turn the reverb off and play 'dry'. I know reverb 'simulates' larger rooms, but if I play in a gym, would the reverb sound 'bad' if I leave the same settings as I do when I practice in my basement? Should I just turn it down, or play 'dry'...? They have a PA system and they will mic the amp, so not sure if this matters or not.

Your feedback would be most welcome

thanks in advance
iamthehub


I am a reverb junkie so I'll provide you with the following advice:

1) natural room reverb does not replace amp reverb - it is something you need to adapt to and factor in, but you can't simply run a dry amp signal miced into a PA and expect the room to give you good amp-style reverb. If reverb is a big part of your tone ( like in surf or blues or indie atmospheric styles), then you should default on the settings you are used to and adjust if necessary depending on the room. I have played all kinds of shows from bars, to theaters, to outdoor festivals, and I have never run into a situation where the room gave out reverb comparable to my amp.

2) The biggest issue you will run into if you have never played live is how cranking the volume of your amp will change the tone. If you are used to playing with amp on 3 and then you arrive at a show and crank it to 6 - everything will change in your tone, including how the reverb sounds and how your guitar reacts. You absolutely need to set your amp right at jamming ( i.e. playing with a drummer if that is the case) levels before playing shows so that you are prepared for that and have a good default tone that you are used to. Don't just show up at a gig and drastically change the volume on your amp - this will completely throw you off - be prepared.

3) never expect a sound engineer to be able to dial in the right amount of reverb - they have no idea what you have in mind and they probably couldn't care less about your set - so be prepared !
#7
Quote by iamthehub

My question is this: For the first time I'll be performing in a gym (one basketball court, with stands), so I don't know if I should turn the reverb off and play 'dry'. I know reverb 'simulates' larger rooms, but if I play in a gym, would the reverb sound 'bad' if I leave the same settings as I do when I practice in my basement? Should I just turn it down, or play 'dry'...? They have a PA system and they will mic the amp, so not sure if this matters or not.


You are almost certainly going to want to turn your reverb down.

How much? It's hard to say. Depends on a lot of factors. This is a big part of what a sound check is for.

However, try to listen when somebody else is playing the guitar, or have somebody who knows what sound you're going for listen while you play. One thing that happens with effects like reverb and delays is that, when you're playing, the tactile sensation of playing the guitar makes the music sound more precise to you than it is. You can think you're rocking it super tight, but your bandmates have a a hard time locking in to your groove, and to the audience it's just a wall of mush.

Another important thing to be aware of is the difference between stage sound and house sound. The shape of the room can have a huge impact on the difference between these two things, so, again, while you're playing you need somebody you trust to walk the room and listen.

I will say that "too much reverb" is a very common, inexperienced-band problem. When in doubt, go dryer.
#8
Quote by reverb66
I am a reverb junkie so I'll provide you with the following advice:

1) natural room reverb does not replace amp reverb - it is something you need to adapt to and factor in, but you can't simply run a dry amp signal miced into a PA and expect the room to give you good amp-style reverb. If reverb is a big part of your tone ( like in surf or blues or indie atmospheric styles), then you should default on the settings you are used to and adjust if necessary depending on the room. I have played all kinds of shows from bars, to theaters, to outdoor festivals, and I have never run into a situation where the room gave out reverb comparable to my amp.

2) The biggest issue you will run into if you have never played live is how cranking the volume of your amp will change the tone. If you are used to playing with amp on 3 and then you arrive at a show and crank it to 6 - everything will change in your tone, including how the reverb sounds and how your guitar reacts. You absolutely need to set your amp right at jamming ( i.e. playing with a drummer if that is the case) levels before playing shows so that you are prepared for that and have a good default tone that you are used to. Don't just show up at a gig and drastically change the volume on your amp - this will completely throw you off - be prepared.

3) never expect a sound engineer to be able to dial in the right amount of reverb - they have no idea what you have in mind and they probably couldn't care less about your set - so be prepared !



Thanks for the advice! Great points, I appreciate you taking the time to reply.
#9
Quote by HotspurJr
You are almost certainly going to want to turn your reverb down.

How much? It's hard to say. Depends on a lot of factors. This is a big part of what a sound check is for.

However, try to listen when somebody else is playing the guitar, or have somebody who knows what sound you're going for listen while you play. One thing that happens with effects like reverb and delays is that, when you're playing, the tactile sensation of playing the guitar makes the music sound more precise to you than it is. You can think you're rocking it super tight, but your bandmates have a a hard time locking in to your groove, and to the audience it's just a wall of mush.

Another important thing to be aware of is the difference between stage sound and house sound. The shape of the room can have a huge impact on the difference between these two things, so, again, while you're playing you need somebody you trust to walk the room and listen.

I will say that "too much reverb" is a very common, inexperienced-band problem. When in doubt, go dryer.



Thank you for the reply. I think I know exactly what you mean how reverb gives the sensation of playing more precise... I think that is why I like it - it hides my bad mistakes

I believe we get some practice time in the gym so ill get a chance to hear others play, as well as get someone to give me feedback on my sound.

Thanks again
#10
One other thing:

Once you set your sound - based on how it sounds for the audience - your sound is set. Stop tinkering with it.

Another inexperienced-guitarist thing is to have the sound set, and then notice, "hm, I can't hear myself quite as well as I can in practice. I'll turn up a bit." Not only does this throw of the whole band's sound, but it can result in volume creep, where other players start playing louder so they can hear themselves, so you turn it up some more, and so on, and so on, and you never notice because, since you're in the middle of it, it all sounds subjectively about the same volume.

Check your sound. Have somebody listen from the audience perspective. FIgure out your settings - and trust them.

Being able to play when your sound, on stage, is not what you want it to be is big part of the daily life of a gigging musician. In practice, you set up your sound for you. On stage, you set it up for the audience.
#12
Hi Everyone,

Just wanted to thank everyone who replied… I played my gig, I turned down the reverb as some suggested. Some friends said I sounded good, but maybe they don't want to hurt my feelings
#13
^ You could have recorded your performance - that way you would know.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ You could have recorded your performance - that way you would know.


Actually, I think a few friends used their phones to take videos, but I haven't seen it yet. I don't think the quality will be very good. Next time I'll have to ask the sound people if we can record it from the mixing board... Live and learn
#15
I think you want to use a room mic, not the sound straight from the mixing board, if you want to know how the gig actually sounded like to the listener's ear.

You could buy a recorder. I use a Zoom H2 and it sounds pretty decent. It should at least give you some kind of idea of your sound and if you sound too muddy.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 27, 2014,
#16
Thanks for the tip. The Zoom is pretty inexpensive, and I can probably use it to record my own stuff too.

thx again