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#1
accent is assúmed to occúr on the penúltimate sýllable. all other stressed vowel sounds must be marked. monosyllábic words need not be marked.

please note that the suffix -ble is, in áctual fact, a vowel sound. be careful of diphthongs. your áccented cháracters are:

á é í ó ú ý ẃ
i don't know why i feel so dry
#11
Quote by VillainousLatin
pls no... this is the worst part about Spanish and the reason I like English better. Don't ruin it for me

You actually prefer English over Spanish? Do you hate structure, or something?
#12
Shüt yøür fåcé.
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#13
no umlauts allowed

#firenonis




#14
Quote by MinterMan22
no ümlauts allowed
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
#16
Quote by MinterMan22
no umlauts allowed

#firenonis


Fück yöü bïtch Ï dö whät Ï wänt
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 50-54
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 0-0
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 0-0
#17
Quote by sickman411
Please play by the rules, Bánjocal.

EDIT: you too Chazz

ídiots


now that's linguistics

VíllainousLatin: this is an éxercise. accentuátion is often taken for granted in english. writing like this helps us craft better póetry.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#18
Áççhôles, áççhôles éverywére

(I dôn't really thínk thát, I just wânted to write "áççhôles")
(Lól, the "ç" is like a weird defórmed "s")
#20
Quote by Eastwinn
accentuátion


here i take the -tion ending to be implícitly two vowel sounds, like the spanish -cíon. thus it is nécessary to mark an acúte even though it appears redundant.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#21
I know no one cares abóut this excépt for Easty but I thought this would be easy for me since this is génerally the convention in my native language but it's áctually a bit tricky becáuse English words tend to end in cónsonants (the convention is dífferent with words ending in cónsonants) or silent Es, which ruins the whole thing sometímes.

What's even weirder is that these types of Es can often also be silent in Portuguese but they're still considered a sýllable. The thing is, they have a pronunciation but are sometímes left out entírely.

Also, accents in Portuguese aren't only for stress, there's a sound associated to them, as évidenced by Minicaxotinho's post, where ^ sometímes fits better than ´.

Quote by Eastwinn
here i take the -tion ending to be implícitly two vowel sounds, like the spanish -cíon. thus it is nécessary to mark an acúte even though it appears redundant.

do u even yod-coalescence m8
#22
Quote by necrosis1193
Fück yöü bïtch Ï dö whät Ï wänt

i spy w/ my little eye:

a total fking nerd




#23
the accentuátion rules i presented are naḯve Spanish. i figure most américan speakers would be familiar†. i see what you are saying franc. the síngular conjugátion of the verb to suppóse provídes a good example:

i suppóse
you suppóse
he/she/it supposes

the términal e doesn't províde a vowel sound untíl the third person case where it meddles with accentuátion marks. my mocked-up rules are óbviously unfít for english.

as for yod-coalescence, i hear where this occúrs in -tion. however, -tion and ánalogues deríve from latin -ion which is clearly two vowel sounds. i do not know when the vowel sounds were combíned and the yod repláced. i'll look into it.

† here i take the -iar ending to be a single sýllable. despíte oríginally being two sounds, as far as i know most díalects of english only pronoúnce one.
i don't know why i feel so dry
Last edited by Eastwinn at Oct 16, 2014,
#24
Quote by chrismendiola
You actually prefer English over Spanish? Do you hate structure, or something?


Probably, I just hate having to accentuate words... I'm too lazy.

Quote by Eastwinn

VíllainousLatin: this is an éxercise. accentuátion is often taken for granted in english. writing like this helps us craft better póetry.


Well it does help me know how to pronounce the words better. So I guess it's useful at least.
Last edited by VillainousLatin at Oct 16, 2014,
#25
Quote by VillainousLatin
Probably, I just hate having to accentuate words... I'm too lazy.

I was talking about how the Spanish language has a lot more structure to it, whereas English is practically anarchy formed into a language. It's a chaotic mess compared to Spanish. On your point, though, they may take more effort, but accents make it a lot less confusing to distinguish between homonyms/homographs.

As for the rulés of this thréád, well, I just cán't be bothered with all that effort.
#26
Quote by Eastwinn
† here i take the -iar ending to be a single sýllable. despíte oríginally being two sounds, as far as i know most díalects of english only pronoúnce one.

I wouldn't have done it like that but I respect your decision (<-- same there)

I had a símilar problem with the word "dífferent". The first E isn't really pronóunced in practice but it's sort of still there. It's the same as "famíliar" really.
#27
i guess we must decíde whether we mean to write some formal english or match our own díalects.

ínb4 we start writing in IPÁ.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#28
$k|ññ¥ €MØ @$$ £Â†€®
bawitaba a bang a bang diggy diggy diggy sed the boogie sed up jump the boogie
#29
I have a lot of problems with this thread but mainly

1) bias towards certain accents/dialects/idiolects; discouraging diversity
2) I don't even know what's going on with your phonology easty


I would enjoy writing in IPA though. Narrow transcriptions preferred
cat
#31
Quote by sickman411
Accentuating English sounds fun but I didn't get the chance to do it in this sentence.

Are you sure there's nothing to accéntuate in that sentence?

Quote by Eastwinn
here i take the -tion ending to be implícitly two vowel sounds, like the spanish -cíon. thus it is nécessary to mark an acúte even though it appears redundant.

I take it you mean the Spanish '-ción'?
Last edited by ultimate-slash at Oct 17, 2014,
#32
Quote by guitarxo
I have a lot of problems with this thread but mainly

1) bias towards certain accents/dialects/idiolects; discouraging diversity
2) I don't even know what's going on with your phonology easty


I would enjoy writing in IPA though. Narrow transcriptions preferred


I prefer drinking IPA.
#34
the rules i chose are those presented to someone learning spanish (sans rules about consonant ending versus vowel endings, i don't really remember those). i didn't chose them because i thought they would best represent spoken english but because a good portion of us here used them in school at some point. it makes you think about the words you write when you write them which is all i hoped to accomplish. writing better accentuation rules would require a knowledge of english globally that i do not have.

in my previous posts i tried to strike a balance between the 'proper' english i speak and the accent i have (mid-atlantic, 'regular' american accent with obnoxious baltimore touches*). this was troublesome. since english has no central authority and 'proper' english is boring anyway we should definitely just start writing with IPA narrow enough that our individual voices come through.

* i'll come back with a post using IPA but for now accept that the baltimore accent drops syllables according to mysterious rules handed down by Edgar Allen Poe so deciding how many syllables are in a word is difficult sometimes.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#35
dorksssssssssssssss
O.K.

“There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
~ Bill Watterson


O__o
#36
đabe


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#37
I speak completely neutrally, with not emphasis on any syllable, or rather even emphasis on every syllable
superman is killing himself tonight
#39
Quote by UltimateGuizar
Whät's göìng ön ìn hérè ånd whý ís everyöné tälkíng fúnný?

Maybe you're just reading funny.
#40
Quote by Baby Joel
I speak completely neutrally, with not emphasis on any syllable, or rather even emphasis on every syllable

Vocaroo pls
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