#1
hello everyone, i'm new here..so, i have an epiphone tony iommi sg (with the gibson pickups) and a yamaha pacifica with two factory humbuckers. i play heavy/doom metal and i like to keep the tone knob to 0, it gives me the kind of sound i like to produce. i have no problem when i play with the yamaha but with the sg it's all very muddy and noisy..i've read somewhere that guitars for starters(like the yamaha) have very bright pickups and i thought that this is why the yamaha doesn't get that shitty when i drop the tone..is this true?? what could i do to make the epiphone sound better with tone on 0? change the pickup with a brighter one??
#2
Quote by dullhammer
hello everyone, i'm new here..so, i have an epiphone tony iommi sg (with the gibson pickups) and a yamaha pacifica with two factory humbuckers. i play heavy/doom metal and i like to keep the tone knob to 0, it gives me the kind of sound i like to produce. i have no problem when i play with the yamaha but with the sg it's all very muddy and noisy..i've read somewhere that guitars for starters(like the yamaha) have very bright pickups and i thought that this is why the yamaha doesn't get that shitty when i drop the tone..is this true?? what could i do to make the epiphone sound better with tone on 0? change the pickup with a brighter one??


If you want a brighter tone, just turn the tone knob up.

There's nothing magical about 0. There is a resistor (potentiometer) and a capacitor down there and together they create a filter. when you turn the tone knob down you're basically separating out some of the higher frequencies and they're not going to the amp anymore. The more you turn the tone down, the less high frequencies you'll get.
You could change the capacitor and/or potentiometer to give you a brighter sound, but you could also simply turn the knob up.

If you don't like the pickups then that's a different issue entirely.
#3
Turn the flippin tone knob UP.

It's just a treble roll-off, after all, and humbuckers start out sounding a lot different from single coils, and that carries through no matter what you do with the knob.
#4
yes i know all that, but as i said, i have no trouble at all when playing with the yamaha but with the sg it sounds crappy, i really can't understand why
#5
Quote by dullhammer
yes i know all that, but as i said, i have no trouble at all when playing with the yamaha but with the sg it sounds crappy, i really can't understand why


Different pickups have different resonance peaks, so some sound brighter than others. If the guitars had no tone controls at all, and you played them through the same amp settings, they would sound different. The Yamaha would sound brighter than the SGH. You compensate for these differences to some extent by using the tone controls on the guitar.

And it isn't true about starter guitars having very bright pickups, it depends on the design. Their main shortcoming is that the tone is often muddy and poorly defined, and that is the reason that I, at least, change them.
#6
Yeah it sounds more like a single coil vs humbucker issue.
You can trade the SG for a guitar that has single coils or you can experiment with the tone knob and the amp settings until you find a tone that you like on the SG.

It's not something that has a clear answer because ultimately it's about finding a sound that sounds good to you.


Edit:
I wonder if you might be having gain trouble? what amp do you have? where do you set your gain?
If you're using a solid state amp then it may be possible that the humbuckers are putting too much signal into the amp. I have EMGs on one guitar and the other has the Epiphone Les Paul pickups. The EMGs can very easily put out too much signal for my solid state amps. they clip like crazy and sound terrible. I have to turn the guitar volume and the gain down to get a decent sound from some of them.

if you haven't tried turning down the volume on your guitar then that might be a good experiment.
Last edited by paul.housley.7 at Oct 16, 2014,
#7
i've tried turning the volume down but i can't do that at rehearsal because of the drummer...the gain is always at maximum, i use a line 6 spider III 75w
#8
maybe the pots aren't as good in the other one, or it has a different value capacitor or something like that.

though I'm pretty much with the other guys who have replied- you're overcomplicating it. if it sounds the way you want with the tone on 2, or 5, or wherever, mission accomplished. you set it where it sounds good, not to some (probably) arbitrary setting.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#9
Quote by dullhammer
i've tried turning the volume down but i can't do that at rehearsal because of the drummer...the gain is always at maximum, i use a line 6 spider III 75w


Okay you might have a problem with understanding gain, then too.

I have a hard time explaining this without examples, so please don't take offense.
I have an Epi Les Paul that might be capable of around 1 volt of output, maximum. realistically it's usually a lot less than that.
When i plug it into a solid state amp there is a maximum gain value that i don't want to go beyond. that's a preference, not a hard number. It can be any number, but it sounds like you can turn the gain all the way up when you're using the Pacifica and get a sound that you like.

But I also have a guitar with active pickups that can output a significantly higher voltage. If i use the same settings with that guitar then the amp will sound hideously overdriven (to me). I think it's highly likely that you have a similar situation with your guitars. The humbuckers on your SG are probably going to put out a bigger signal than the single coils on your Pacifica.

And there may be other problems too, because a solid state amp can be designed to break up in a somewhat "tube-like" fashion but they also have a break-up point of their own where you're putting in too much signal. That breakup sounds different from the fake tube breakup.

There's more that I could say about that but the main point that I'm trying to make is that you might want to consider replacing your spyder with a tube amp.
Last edited by paul.housley.7 at Oct 17, 2014,