#1
Hi there.

I'm a songwriter and I mostly write my own songs, without a Co-Writer.
Sometimes I find it really hard to go further, when the lyrics is done, or at least almost done. Lately I've been wondering if a Co-Writer could be helpful?
Help a little on the musical side and come with input for the lyrics.

What's the opinion out there?

Thanks anyway!
#2
Nothing wrong with a little help, you might find their different approach to thing to be real helpful, e.g. in my band we'd individually create a song, then alter it via input from the band members, works pretty well
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Dressing my steak with cum is just adding more protein to my steak.


Quote by Roc8995
The Hello Kitty Strat is the most metal guitar known to man.
#3
I've done it in the past. We divided it so he did lyrics, I did the music. Occasionally the other way around.

It relieves the pressure on you a bit, so it can be good. Then you've got someone else to blame if the songs are poor.
#4
Generally in my band, I write the music and the singer writes the lyrics and vocal melody because I'm just no good at that stuff. But think about partnerships like Lennon/McCartney - they could write songs fine on their own but the real magic procured when they co-wrote. So if you can find a co-writer who you really click with, you should probably stick with that.

If anything, it literally doubles the number of people who enjoy your song right from the offset - 2 instead of 1
#5
Quote by PedalFreak94
Hi there.

I'm a songwriter and I mostly write my own songs, without a Co-Writer.
Sometimes I find it really hard to go further, when the lyrics is done, or at least almost done. Lately I've been wondering if a Co-Writer could be helpful?
Help a little on the musical side and come with input for the lyrics.

What's the opinion out there?

Thanks anyway!


Hey man,

I'm in a 3 piece band, and usually I write songs with my bass player. What happens is usually I come up with a riff I really like or a chord progression with lyrics or smth, and he hears it and tells me whether its good or its sucks. Based on that, we then figure out bass parts and the arrangements and once we're done, we'll play it for our drummer who will then add his crazy brand of playing. I find that helps a lot, cos when you write alone, sometimes you lack that objectivity you need to throw out crappy/generic sounding/boring riff ideas that may sound awesome to us because we wrote us, but will surely be boring to people hearing it.

That said, usually I come up with the lyrics and melody, cos I play and sing. Sometimes, the roles get reversed, and he writes bass riffs which I tell him either are good or suck, and then we work guitar parts around that.

I think it kinda helps to have a co-writer. Keeps you on your toes. If you dont know anyone tho, you could always play it to friends and/or family, and get feedback. Hopefully theyre honest and will tell you which parts are good, which parts should sound like this or that and so on.
#6
I was in a band for a little bit with a few of my friends. We had two guitar players, me being one and it was nice to co-write a little bit. With writing music, that can be more of a one person thing but its nice if you have two guitarists because one can just play off the other. And when writing lyrics I found that it is easiest in a group. You can all just add lines and change words as you go along which refines it pretty well. I've also written a lot solo, but I definitely prefer writing in a group
#7
@PedalFreak94
I've studied music for over twenty five years. I've played and written songs in a wide variety of genres from country to alternative rock to blues to jazz. Co-writing is one of the best things I've ever done. I recommend any song writer try it a few times. There are a few reasons I recommend it. 1st, extra input really helps when you get stuck. 2nd, a good co-writer can add to what is written, or even improve the song with material (chord changes, lyrics, etc.) you had not thought of. 3rd, there are often times where you learn new song writing skills and techniques which are useful in the future, even if you decide to not use the co-writer's material.
With that said, you really need to keep an open mind when co-writing. You won't always agree with a co-writer. You won't always like their ideas. Plus, being new to co-writing you may find it frustrating to write with other musicians. However, if you stick with it, the long term benefits can be a huge advantage.