#1
I've got a Gibson Les Paul Studio that was fitted with strings gauging from .010 - .046.

Seeing as I usually write/play in drop C, I wanted to go for thicker strings - I found a D'Addario set of strings with sizes .010 - .052.

Will those slightly heavier bottom strings cause intonation issues on my guitar requiring me to recalibrate?

Cheers.
#2
Quote by Seb1uk
Will those slightly heavier bottom strings cause intonation issues on my guitar requiring me to recalibrate?
Yes.

Also since it's for drop C you may wanna look into an even bigger strings set - I used to use .12-.56's for that for example.
Name's Luca.

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#3
Alright cheers.

I would go for thicker strings but I was wondering if I could avoid paying for a technician if only the bottom strings were a little thicker.
#4
Quote by Seb1uk
I was wondering if I could avoid paying for a technician
Setting up a guitar is really not a hard thing and there are plenty tutorials, text and videos and images, on how to do it yourself, so you may wanna go and try doing that.

Worst thing it can happen, you can't set it up good and you bring it to a tech only if you can't manage to do the thing yourself.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#6
Are you telling me that you don't know how to set the intonaton on your guitar? Really? It's so easy. It's time you learned. I check it as a matter of course to monitor how worn my strings are. It takes a few seconds to check.
More importantly, you may also have to adjust your truss rod. Again, a simple job. You're a musician, part of being a musician is knowing how to set up your instrument. Not knowing how is akin to a carpenter not knowing how to sharpen a chisel. There are plenty of tutorials out there on how to do it. Read some.
Adjusting intonation, neck relief and action is something you should know how to do. FFS, it's a Les Paul, they aren't a hard instrument to set up.
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#7
Easy now! Been playing and writing for years, but the hardware side is something I've put off for way too long. Glad to hear it seems like a simple job to sort it out though.
#8
Far too long I would say. It's part of the craft, man. Get onto it.
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#9
Quote by Cathbard
Are you telling me that you don't know how to set the intonaton on your guitar? Really? It's so easy. It's time you learned. I check it as a matter of course to monitor how worn my strings are. It takes a few seconds to check.
More importantly, you may also have to adjust your truss rod. Again, a simple job. You're a musician, part of being a musician is knowing how to set up your instrument. Not knowing how is akin to a carpenter not knowing how to sharpen a chisel. There are plenty of tutorials out there on how to do it. Read some.
Adjusting intonation, neck relief and action is something you should know how to do. FFS, it's a Les Paul, they aren't a hard instrument to set up.

Truss rod adjustment is not as easy as it seems, especially that you don't see the effects immediately. Going to drop C is a significant change and while adjusting truss rod "sort of ok" is not hard, fine-tuning it is a different thing entirely.

I generally agree with the "try to do it yourself and if it goes wrong, give it to a tech/luthier" idea, it SHOULD be doable but it can be a pain in the ass sometimes.
#10
Quote by TheLiberation
Truss rod adjustment is not as easy as it seems, especially that you don't see the effects immediately. Going to drop C is a significant change and while adjusting truss rod "sort of ok" is not hard, fine-tuning it is a different thing entirely.

I generally agree with the "try to do it yourself and if it goes wrong, give it to a tech/luthier" idea, it SHOULD be doable but it can be a pain in the ass sometimes.



Truss rod adjustment and guitar setup in general are bone-friggin'-simple.

We've pretended amongst ourselves (the musicial community) for far too long that there was some sort of magical, mystical mojo inherent in setting up a guitar when the harsh reality is that it's just a simple machine, no more and no less.

“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#11
^+1


Also you will most likely need to reslot the lower 3 slots in the nut.

I have an Epi G-400 I have it setup for drop C and D standard with those strings. It works just fine
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#12
You don't see the effects immediately? What bs is this? Adjusting the truss rod is piss easy. You adjust it, retune, measure it, repeat as necessary. How is that not easy?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band