#1
I'm looking for a Grand Auditorium/OM shape acoustic-electric in that price range. Any suggestions?

I'm more of a finger-picker/blues type of player, but I often play with a pick and strum chords when playing softer types of music.

I'm not too bothered with specs, I think the only thing that's important is a thin/regular profile neck, because I play as much of the fretboard I can reach.

EDIT: Does anyone have any thoughts on the Martin 000RSGT?
Last edited by chrismendiola at Oct 20, 2014,
#2
IMO, the Martin 000-18 is a good guitar for ragtime/blues, so the less-expensive Road series you suggest might be a good bet. - And I like sapele as a tonewood. I'm fairly sure that if I found a good example of the 000RSGT, I would like it better than the 314 for that kind of playing. The 000-15 is another possibility, though the one I tried at the w/e didn't sound good to me
#3
Quote by Tony Done
IMO, the Martin 000-18 is a good guitar for ragtime/blues, so the less-expensive Road series you suggest might be a good bet. - And I like sapele as a tonewood. I'm fairly sure that if I found a good example of the 000RSGT, I would like it better than the 314 for that kind of playing. The 000-15 is another possibility, though the one I tried at the w/e didn't sound good to me

I've played both and I can't decide which I like more. I didn't like the 000-15 I tried, I can't place what it was but it lacked something in the sound, even the dreadnought version. Maybe I just don't like mahogany for acoustics . It also has no electronics, so that rules out that option.
#4
Quote by chrismendiola
I've played both and I can't decide which I like more. I didn't like the 000-15 I tried, I can't place what it was but it lacked something in the sound, even the dreadnought version. Maybe I just don't like mahogany for acoustics . It also has no electronics, so that rules out that option.


My impression with the bigger Taylors is that the big open bass sounds good in the shop, but the lack of tightness would be a disadvantage for blues/ragtime fingerpicking. I have a similar objection to the big scalloped-braced Martins. My favourite for fingerpicking is an old all-laminate Maton M300. It has unusual double-X bracing, and the sound is tight and bright.

I personally wouldn't worry about the presence or otherwise of electronics, because I prefer good soundhole pickups anyway. Even with piezos, I reckon you can retrofit better ones than come in lower price range guitars anyway.
#5
Quote by Tony Done
My impression with the bigger Taylors is that the big open bass sounds good in the shop, but the lack of tightness would be a disadvantage for blues/ragtime fingerpicking. I have a similar objection to the big scalloped-braced Martins. My favourite for fingerpicking is an old all-laminate Maton M300. It has unusual double-X bracing, and the sound is tight and bright.

I personally wouldn't worry about the presence or otherwise of electronics, because I prefer good soundhole pickups anyway. Even with piezos, I reckon you can retrofit better ones than come in lower price range guitars anyway.

I always take acoustics out of the designated area to remove that confound. I've wanted to try a Maton since I discovered Tommy Emmanuel, but alas, I'm from the US and they're hard to find.

I'll admit you've lost me after the first paragraph. After nearly four years, I'm still lost in the world of guitar gear, especially when it comes to acoustic guitar. You'll have to bare with me. I'm not sure what the sonic difference between onboard electronics and installed pickups, but I know I want it to sound more natural- as close as you can get to a mic'd guitar with no electronics.
#6
Quote by chrismendiola
I always take acoustics out of the designated area to remove that confound. I've wanted to try a Maton since I discovered Tommy Emmanuel, but alas, I'm from the US and they're hard to find.

I'll admit you've lost me after the first paragraph. After nearly four years, I'm still lost in the world of guitar gear, especially when it comes to acoustic guitar. You'll have to bare with me. I'm not sure what the sonic difference between onboard electronics and installed pickups, but I know I want it to sound more natural- as close as you can get to a mic'd guitar with no electronics.


A lot of what you could call acoustic aficionados prefer to buy a non-electrified acoustic and choose thier own pickup and preamp systems. It's complicated subject, as you can imagine as their are both pickups and (essential) preamps to consider. soundboard transducers (SBTs) are usually preferred to undersadlde transducers (USTs), and among the SBTs, K&K are very popular, with something like a Redeye external preamp. There are also systems that combine two or more of mic, UST and SBT, and even EQ modelling to emulate different kinds of acoustics.

Whatever you choose will be something of a tonal compromise, and I happen to prefer the smoother tones of a magnetic pickup to the "Takamine quack/jangle" of many piezos. The one I have in my old Gibson is a Baggs M1 Active, which, although magnetic, is designed to pick up soundboard noise as well, so it acts like a combined piezo and magnetic. The most recent version of this is the M80, which might be even better. I've also figured out how to combine a magnetic with the Maton AP preamp system, so I can get the best of both worlds without the need for an external mixer.

Matons aren't only popular for their acoustic qualities, which are traditionally very different from Martin and Taylor, but they also have a very good piezo/preamp system. Even here in Oz they are fairly expensive, so exported ones wouldn't be very competetive with the likes of Martin and Taylor. Maton are currently redesigning their acoustics to sound more like Taylors, which I think is a lousy idea.
#7
Bump. Anyone?
Quote by Tony Done
A lot of what you could call acoustic aficionados prefer to buy a non-electrified acoustic and choose thier own pickup and preamp systems. It's complicated subject, as you can imagine as their are both pickups and (essential) preamps to consider. soundboard transducers (SBTs) are usually preferred to undersadlde transducers (USTs), and among the SBTs, K&K are very popular, with something like a Redeye external preamp. There are also systems that combine two or more of mic, UST and SBT, and even EQ modelling to emulate different kinds of acoustics.

Whatever you choose will be something of a tonal compromise, and I happen to prefer the smoother tones of a magnetic pickup to the "Takamine quack/jangle" of many piezos. The one I have in my old Gibson is a Baggs M1 Active, which, although magnetic, is designed to pick up soundboard noise as well, so it acts like a combined piezo and magnetic. The most recent version of this is the M80, which might be even better. I've also figured out how to combine a magnetic with the Maton AP preamp system, so I can get the best of both worlds without the need for an external mixer.

Matons aren't only popular for their acoustic qualities, which are traditionally very different from Martin and Taylor, but they also have a very good piezo/preamp system. Even here in Oz they are fairly expensive, so exported ones wouldn't be very competetive with the likes of Martin and Taylor. Maton are currently redesigning their acoustics to sound more like Taylors, which I think is a lousy idea.

I'll look into pickups some more, but based on the information I've read/heard, acoustic pickups tend to accentuate the electric and you lose the acoustic qualities. I'm sure there'll be people who'll tell me I've been told the wrong information and there are options that don't exemplify this, which I hope does happen. I'm still pretty much clueless to gear and I like to learn, so have at it.
#8
In a studio setting, the best way to get the best sound out of any acoustic guitar is, and always will be, a very good microphone (or two). But, for live performance, a pickup and a good acoustic amp is awesome. There are some really good soundhole pickups, and some really good pickup systems that require a little more extensive install. L.R. Baggs makes some great pickups (the Lyric is beautiful). Personally, I think that the "Expression System" that Taylor puts in their 300+ series is among the best sounding pickups there is. Especially the newest version they just put out this year. Plugged into a good acoustic amp, the sound has to be heard to be believed. Unfortunately, the new version is currently only available in the more expensive 500+ series models, and a couple lower-end limited editions.
#9
Quote by chrismendiola
Bump. Anyone? . . . . .


Crafter TC035

Great guitar. Every bit as good as the Taylor and 1/3 of the price.