#1
Hi all,

Just wondering if they are as hard to play as they look? Wondering more about playing them sat down more than stood up, as the shape doesn't look like it would fit in the lap. Finally, do they have good upper fret access ? (It would appear so just checking)
#2


You put it between your legs.

The downside to a V is that it might have a lot of neckdive.
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#3
Of course they have good fret access. There's nothing there to block it.


FWIW, I've owned around 4 Vs (1 regular shaped one and 3 RRs) and they aren't really 'uncomforable' to play so much as different. Usually you sit the guitar on your lap and almost play horizontally. With Vs, you generally sit classical style with the guitar resting on your leg as you prop it up (Like RR in the picture) so that will throw you off initially.
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#4
Thanks for the quick response, is there any disadvantages/advantages to the classical position? And will I be able to play ok like that with a week or 2 of practice?
#5
It's probably the best position ergonomically, look at how straight the wrists stay and the natural shoulder/elbow positioning. There's a reason it's called classical, it's been developed and used over hundreds of years. It's not arbitrary.

Downsides - doesn't translate well to playing standing up for some people, and the cool kids might make fun of you.

It's a good position to learn, you'll probably get used to it after a couple of weeks.
#6
Ok thanks for all the help guys.I don't care if the cool kids don't like it, if it's good enough for RR it's good enough for me. Thanks again.
#7
Quote by Roc8995


Downsides - doesn't translate well to playing standing up for some people, and the cool kids might make fun of you.


My Flying V with Mojave Amp Works pickup is my main gigging guitar. I like playing it standing up because it's so light & balanced. I seldom play it sitting down because of the slight imbalance created sitting it on your leg as lemurflames stated above, although it's so light it doesn't take much to support it while you play.
Also...the cool kids don't laugh. That guitar turns a lot of heads when I break it out. No one around here uses one.
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#8
I find my Gibson Flying V more comfortable than conventional guitar shapes but that's just me. I did have a little trouble accessing higher frets for a while though but I adjusted somehow and now it's fine. My Jackson King V on the other hand I find I'm more comfortable on the upper frets than any other guitar I've ever played.
#9
V is the most comfortable shape. You need to play in classical position (which you should always play in anyways. For posture etc..
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#10
^^Agreed. I've always been a player that preferred to stand up to play, but part of that may be that I've always had trouble playing in the "modern" sitting position (neck parallel to the floor, body of guitar on right leg). Then I finally tried V-shaped guitars and you really are forced to play them in the classical position or stand up. Finally, I'm able to actually sit down and play just like I do standing up.


That said, I still prefer to play standing up.
#11
The only problem I had with the RRs was the neck dive as mentioned. My regular Vs have been pretty comfy (though I won't go so far as to say the most comfortable, that goes to the Strat).
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#12
i don't like the classical position at all

i just play mine standing up
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#13
I only play seated, and think that the Spanish position is ergonomically the best of the three or four common ones - even though I mostly use the right knee position myself.

Neck dive might be a problem, as noted. Albert King played a flying V, and used a strap when seated

#14
I have a V and an ML. Both not great for sitting on the couch or anything really other than standing up or sitting up straight.
Vs generally have better access to the top frets and also look bad-ass.

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#15
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I only play seated, and think that the Spanish position is ergonomically the best of the three or four common ones - even though I mostly use the right knee position myself.

Neck dive might be a problem, as noted. Albert King played a flying V, and used a strap when seated



Damn that's a classy dude. Smoking a pipe and jamming on a 3-a-side V at the same time.
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#16
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
With Vs, you generally sit classical style with the guitar resting on your leg as you prop it up (Like RR in the picture) so that will throw you off initially.



Damn, RR looks so young.
#17
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#18
In the late 70's early 80's I had a 1968 Gibson re-issue Flying V. I remember that it was fun to play live and had a great sound but sitting a practicing with it was a pain in a**. Unfortuanately it also sat for a few years as I moved into a different kind of music and I ended up trading it for a Strat and a Roland Space Echo (I know, I know, but that's not the worst trade I ever did.)
#19
Quote by 12wilsonh1
Hi all,

Just wondering if they are as hard to play as they look?

no.
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#20
The neck dive on V's are mostly fixable with a good strap button location. For example my Jackson RR has no neck dive at all even with a mere nylon strap. The strap button is very close to the center of the V, leaving the big upper horn outside to counter balance the neck weight. (or so I think is happening)

TS, if you buy a V guitar also do buy a footrest. As you already know you need to sit in classical posture with V's, but notice how Randy has his leg elevated to raise the guitar neck to comfortable angle? You can of course elevate with your foot but that makes your leg hurt in long practice sessions, so footrest is recommended.

With normal strat shaped guitars you can get away without footrest because the lower horn raises the neck up but since V's dont have that the guitar, especially Rhoads V's, sits almost sideways on your lap neck barely up at all if you sit feet flat on the floor. You need a good 45 degree angle to keep your wrist straight.

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#21
I've owned several Vs and out of all, the most unseemly is the Gibson, or where both fins are the same size. This is uncomfortable both sitting and standing up.
The Jacksokn and other sharkfin types, where top is longer is actually the most comfortable shape to play live. Looks great, fits the body and you can anchor it to your right leg for high fret access during solos.
Sitting down all Vs are less comfortable to play than Strat shape and I don't own any Vs at the moment, they were sold as soon as I stopped gigging with my metal band.
As a side note - they're very hard to sell, so consider wisely. Maybe the Gibsons will hold resale value but the rest usually depreciate faster than any other guitars beside the BCRich shapes.