#1
The traditional loud in your face metal solos of the likes of dimebag from pantera and and kirk from metallica

they sound so smooth and aggressive. I undertand the 'theory' behind them. they mostly revolve around the pentatonic scales am I correct?


I just cant get that technique down to where i can actually create my own solos that are similar to them.
#2
Have you learnt any of their solos and figured out how the are using the minor and pentatonic scales?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
You need to use your ears. Also notice how Kirk Hammett has his own signature licks that he uses in all of his solos. That's one thing (besides wah wah ) that makes a solo have that Kirk Hammett sound. Same with Dimebag (though I'm not that familiar with his style). Figure out what makes Dimebag sound like Dimebag (other than the harsh tone ).

Yeah, listen to lots of their solos and play them. Try to learn them by ear. Learning by ear makes it a lot easier to really understand what's going on. It's not just one fret after another like if you rely 100% on tabs.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Quote by MaggaraMarine
That's one thing (besides wah wah ) that makes a solo have that Kirk Hammett sound. S


LOL

EDIT: but seriously, yeah, agreed. most of the famous players have their own sort of signature style and licks, and just learning their solos will eventually make it start to stick.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
If you want to learn how to create and improvise solos you need to :

1) learn some solos by ear - start with blues or rock because it's easier to hear the individual notes.
2) learn some practical theory - scales , intervals , chord progression naming ( ii,v,i etc.).
3) practice improvising solos and practice taking phrases from a solo and adapting them to different musical contexts.
#7
Check out Transcribe (http://www.seventhstring.com/) ... excellent tool for slowing down, keeping pitch same, and looping, so you can tear a solo apart, study the phrasing etc.

I've used it for everything from flat out Charlie Parker and John Coltrane to John Schofield, Greg Howe, Yngwie and so on. Seriously good value for money and extremely easy to use, with a great sound.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Oct 22, 2014,
#9
Quote by AlanHB
Have you learnt any of their solos and figured out how the are using the minor and pentatonic scales?

yes i have. but i get mixed up with the technique and how to actually create a solo like that. i can play their solos. and i know whats going on theory wise. but if i try to make my own it never seems to come out right. nothing adds up or flows.
#10
Quote by fupashredder
yes i have. but i get mixed up with the technique and how to actually create a solo like that. i can play their solos. and i know whats going on theory wise. but if i try to make my own it never seems to come out right. nothing adds up or flows.


Are you sure it sounds as bad as you think it does? Improvisation is a skill you develop over the course of your entire life
#11
There are two main ways you can have trouble doing this. One is your brain cannot think of the sound you want. The other is you have trouble putting the sounds your brain is thinking of into the guitar.

I know you have a general idea of the sort of thing you want, but you need to know specifically. Maybe you do, maybe you don't, idk. Knowing the theory or scales will not really help you on its own. Learning some of the popular licks is helpful and good, but what you really want is like being able to speak spanish, not just ask for the bathroom, or for a beer or whatever. Although those would be quite useful, you want to be able to say anything you can think of.

To practice this, you don't even need your guitar. If you can clearly hear their solos in your mind, then that's good. You can practice your own licks on top of theirs in your songs in your mind as well.

The other part is getting those sounds onto your guitar. For that, learning some scales I think is very good. For fast runs especially, knowing your theory is important, but you can't go on theory alone, you need to know what it sounds like.

One thing I find helpful for this, is to stick a cd of theirs on, and just play over it, doing your thing, and listening to them, trying to mimic some stuff on the fly. You might get some right and iss a bunch, who cares? learn some of the cooler parts you like, and look how that fits in the key or in the environment if the key is modulating/chords outside of it playing.

Another strong thing is to sing what you want to play as you play it. This forces you to play the notes you imagine, rather than the patterns you know. It also let's you notice your mistake and you have a reference note to play to, so you can find the right one, and learn that for next time.

But for this your ideas in your mind need to be at a certain level.

I find this the best/most fun approach to learning improv of any genre.

Another reason you might have trouble is physical ability, you are not agile or dexterous enough, strong enough. For that, you just need practice.

Knowing a thing or two about theory is important, but really what matters is the ideas you have. Theory is not ideas, it is useful tools to help you find the ideas you have on your instrument. That's my approach anyway.

To me, one of the most wonderful things about freestyle, and the most difficult, is that it is not just something you can read how to do in a book, it's not cut and dry like that. It's like trying to read how to be funny. You could learn a few jokes, but it's not the same. It's your expression, it comes from you. But there is a lot you can learn to draw from, and many masters you can study.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Oct 22, 2014,