#1
I wrote a little solo for a progression i had laying around, problem is i have no idea what this scale is called. I came up with it by ear. I gave you the solo with the chords that are played and then the scale pattern afterwards in a gp file. pls help
Attachments:
solo.gp5
#2
The scale is 5th mode of G harmonic minor (i.e D HM5) ... or D Mixolydian b9 b6.

(1, b2 3 4 5 b6 b7)

cheers, Jerry
#3
Also known as phrygian dominant.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
Your scale pattern only has 6 notes, but you used a Bb on the chord progression and it can be added perfectly to the scale.
(Eb F# G A Bb C D Eb)
That's a Lydian Sharp 2 Mode in Eb. I improvised with this scale over the chord progression and Eb does seem to be the root.
I liked it.
#5
Quote by HawkniteSH
Your scale pattern only has 6 notes, but you used a Bb on the chord progression and it can be added perfectly to the scale.
(Eb F# G A Bb C D Eb)
That's a Lydian Sharp 2 Mode in Eb. I improvised with this scale over the chord progression and Eb does seem to be the root.
I liked it.

Um, no. D is clearly the root, and the scale is D Phrygian Dominant.
#6
Quote by The4thHorsemen
Um, no. D is clearly the root, and the scale is D Phrygian Dominant.


Yes D phrygian dominant works too, he left the 6th out, though. I thought it sounded nice with the root on Eb
#7
^ The root isn't on Eb because the chords in the background suggest something else. You can of course think the way you want but that doesn't really make Eb the root note.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Question: what does knowing the scale name really do for you? Are you a better musician now, because you know the scale name? No.

So, what did you accomplish? Nothing, really.
#9
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Question: what does knowing the scale name really do for you? Are you a better musician now, because you know the scale name? No.

So, what did you accomplish? Nothing, really.

Knowing the name of it allows him to discuss it with other musicians and he also probably remembers it better. What do you have against naming things? It's actually very useful.

I could name augmented sixth chord a wild boar chord for myself(not knowing what it's actually called, but knowing the theory concept), but maybe it's better to do the research and find out its actual name so I know what others are talking about when they mention it?

SO YES, it potentially makes you a better musician!!!1
Last edited by Elintasokas at Oct 22, 2014,
#10
Quote by Elintasokas
Knowing the name of it allows him to discuss it with other musicians and he also probably remembers it better.

Yes, and although communication is useful; it's doesn't actually teach him anything about the scale. He won't learn how to use it. He won't learn how interval 1 interacts with interval 2 and so on and so forth. He needs to use the scale to do that. Knowing some fancy name for it is just fluff.

I could name augmented sixth chord a wild boar chord for myself(not knowing what it's actually called, but knowing the theory concept), but maybe it's better to do the research and find out its actual name so I know what others are talking about when they mention it?

The thing is, actually knowing the name of the augmented sixth chord doesn't do shit for you, other than allow facilitation of discussion, because it's a decently-known chord. Knowing the name doesn't teach you how to use it, what its function is, etc.

The key to your whole concept is that you need to know the theory behind it, which you don't know just by knowing the name of a chord, scale, etc. Of course, since an augmented sixth chord is fairly common, you could easily find examples where it is used and evaluate the theory in said examples. BUT you need to know the basic theory beforehand to do that.

SO YES, it potentially makes you a better musician!!!1

Except it doesn't. Not in a practical sense.
#11
Naming things is what humans do, it is an important step to learning about something. It creates a label in our mind and helps us categorize our experiences.

Of course, just knowing the name of the scale won't teach him how to use it, but that wasn't really the nature of the thread. He showed the thing he was doing and asked what it was.

The only real thing we could tell him about how to use the scale (that's different from other scales, and he didn't ask anyways) is that the interval between the b2 and the 3 is what gives Phrygian Dominant it's characteristic 'exotic' sound. Why not say something like that yourself instead of acting like naming things is trivial?
#12
@Crazysam

It is easier to use the scale if you know its name.

For example if you know that major chords are called major chords and you also know what a major chord sounds like, it makes it easier than only knowing the sound. That way you can instantly find the stuff you are looking for. And that's why naming things helps. Humans learn about things a lot easier if they can categorize them.

Why not learn the scale name? I mean, if TS likes the way it sounds like, it is also good to know the name. Knowing the name only helps you remember it. If you didn't know the names of the intervals, I'm pretty sure it would be harder to recognize them by ear. If you know what a fifth is and can play it on guitar, remembering the sound also gets easier because you can name the sound. And that's the whole point of theory - naming sounds.

My point is, it is a lot easier to learn how to use the phrygian dominant scale if you know what a phrygian dominant scale is. Only remembering the name makes it easier to remember the pattern (1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6, b7). Knowing the scale name also helps you at recognizing it when some other people play the scale. It's not just a random scale with no name. By remembering the name it is also easier to remember the sound/fingerings/the scale degrees and all that.

I do agree that not all collections of notes need to be named because some of them are just some other scales + one accidental. And usually that accidental is used only in a certain context - for example in a secondary dominant - so it's not really even part of the scale. And in that case I completely agree with you. Naming a collection of random notes may not even make sense and doesn't tell anything about the way the notes function. But phrygian dominant is a pretty common scale. It is used a lot and has a distinct sound. And IMO it makes sense to name it, at least in this case.

Also, IMO the question TS asked was good. He discovered the scale by himself. He did it all by ear. So the sound came first. If the question had been "how do I write solos by using the phrygian dominant scale", it would have been a different kind of case. And then I would have agreed with you.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 22, 2014,