#1
Just curious how everyone likes to practice and how much time per day everyone spends on this. Do you break up your practice time into shorter segments (like 20-30min, 3x day, for example) or just play one long session?

What do you like to spend your practice time on? When learning new riffs, do you prefer to section out small pieces and hammer them out to perfection before continuing to add on more, or do you try to work through the whole piece?

Do you ever jump around between songs to prevent boredom, or just stick with one until you've mastered it and then move on to the next?
#2
I have a lot of time, so I usually do an hour or so 3 or 4 times a day. First I improvise to tracks, then do tech exercises till I'm bored. I should really study more theory and stuff, but that just gives me a headache and drains my motivation, so I prefer discover new things on my own.

I never really do other peoples songs, the ones I need to play live I know already, and if we add some new ones it takes a few days only as we do stuff that general audiences know...so pretty simple.
Last edited by Tempoe at Oct 22, 2014,
#3
1/3 Technique (this includes getting new concepts under my fingers)
1/3 Improvisation (this applies said concepts)

1/3 Composing.

That's all I do now. I have completely stopped transcribing/playing actual songs.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
I don't practice.

I just jam out and shit and try to emulate my idols playing style and sound and consolidate my many influences into my own music
ayy lmao
#5
It depends on what type of pieces I'm working on and where I am in them.

There are a few different aspects to learning a piece and they tend to overlap quite a bit. The key components are learning the notes, figuring out an interpretation and then finalising everything as well as just maintaining it. Ideally, one would start working on the learning of notes and interpretation at nearly the same time, and practicing the piece in a way that automatically maintains it. Once one has learned the piece, it can be good to go back to the other aspects of learning every so often just to keep everything in check and make sure all is well.

In terms of learning the notes:

First, slowly practicing small sections in chunks, figuring out fingerings and other fun stuff like that.

After that, I proceed to start stringing those chunks together and practicing transitions. These chunks get progressively longer and longer as I string more of them together.

Usually, there are some tricky sections that stand out. When those come, I know to devote more time to those so I can master them as well as the rest of the piece.

Also, memorisation happens at some point. I tend to be a pretty quick memoriser so that usually happens as I am initially learning the notes. There are many types of memory that can be utilised to your advantage here and I would advise incorporating as many types as possible so that memorisation can be as efficient and strong as possible.

In terms of interpretation, there are many important things to consider, but here are a couple key ones:

You want to be able to see both the small picture and big picture at the same time. What is happening on both the micro and macro level at a given place?

How does the music flow? Where do you want to stress your phrases?

How do different editions of the same piece compare? How does this affect your approach?

What is the significance of repetition of themes in the music and how will that shape your interpretation?

Also, in terms of maintenance, a few key points:

Slow staccato (at least on piano) is very effective for maintaining fast passagework at a high level and keeping things clean.

It can be good to practice slow things fast and fast things slow at times. Fast passages should be practiced slow to a degree to help maintain clarity and slow passages can be practiced fast to help see lines and how to shape them.

Dotted rhythms can also be used to maintain velocity.


I tend to break up my practice into 2 or 3 chunks, and usually it amounts to somewhere around 2-3 hours a day.
#6
Quote by RNFNRQueen
Just curious how everyone likes to practice and how much time per day everyone spends on this. Do you break up your practice time into shorter segments (like 20-30min, 3x day, for example) or just play one long session?

What do you like to spend your practice time on? When learning new riffs, do you prefer to section out small pieces and hammer them out to perfection before continuing to add on more, or do you try to work through the whole piece?

Do you ever jump around between songs to prevent boredom, or just stick with one until you've mastered it and then move on to the next?

1) But most of the time I usually put it into one long session, especially when I get into the mood to practice.

2) I like to break up a phrase into multiple pieces and work on the exact part that I'm having trouble with. I don't think there's much point in practicing a large section over and over again unless I want to familiarize myself with it.

3) I jump around many songs depending on what I feel like working on, which means that it can take me months to get down a song fully.
#7
I don't practice. I play. No structure, just when I feel like it. No, I wouldn't have been a better guitarplayer had I structured some idiotic "practice routine". I would have quit.
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#8
Most of the time i break up my practice into 2 segments. I usually practice 2 x 2hours a day on average, but i'm not sure, i don't really keep time. I practice until i am done with the task i have set for myself that day.

I do a short warmup and then the rest of my practice is centered around ear training. To me all practice must be ear training, cause i fundamentally believe if i can't hear something properly in my head i don't own it yet.

So i will practice singing the fundamentals (intervals, triads, seventh chords, chord tones through tunes), i transcribe a lot from tunes, but only the parts i enjoy (I will often find 5-7 recordings of the tune i am working on, find a bassline i enjoy, comping i enjoy and the a soloist that have some phrases i enjoy, then take those out), incorporating the vocabulary i have transcribed into my own playing and making it my own, work with different concepts, and focused listening. If i find a weak spot in my playing i have a journal on my phone were i write down stuff i need to improve. For example i might write down "comping on 2-5-1's sounds bland and not hip enough", so then i will find atleast 10 recordings of players comping on 2-5-1's (piano or guitar) that i think sound good, and learn those and put them through every key. Then i don't have that issue anymore.

That is pretty much my process regardless if it is jazz or country to funk we are talking about. Work on the ear and my vocabulary, and then find my weakspots and get rid of them.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#9
now my tasks are:

melodic patterns..there are several hundred of them..just in ascending order..

diminished patterns..many variations (remember dim7 chords are also 7b9 chords-no root) so there is a lot of room to experiment using melodic minor and the modes produced

melodic patterns..using chords I iii V vii ii IV vi I as the frame work the note pattern for each chord - lets say - 1536 on each chord..learn it in the circle of fifths..then chromatically and at each chromatic step..go through the circle of fifths from that point etc..begin to incorporate it in my playing/improve etc. -- long term result is being able to produce a melodic riff at any point in any key...worth the effort..

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Oct 24, 2014,
#10
Wolf, if you are gonna play with dim chords you gotta get that WH scale going. Who needs MM when you have the almighty dim(maj7) chord? Johnny Smith's favorite!
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
The only thing I make sure to practice every single day is all my scales and arpeggios. I also try to do verry verry long tones on my wind instruments.

If I feel like it, I spend an extra 45 min or so playing whatever music I like at the moment. Of course I rehearse and play shows as well
#12
I used to just sit at my computer and learn random songs for 3 hours until I got bored, now after having really gotten into the music theory due to violin, it has changed a bit.

Now I usually will find some songs I want to learn the tabs of when I am bored, and practice those in between actual practice times I guess. Most of my time now is spent memorizing the scales and how to notes I am playing match with sheet music.

Then I also have random times when I just absorb any knowledge of styles I can, most of the time being more scales and chords..

Also the last thing is of course improving my speed.

I don't really have a structure for guitar practice to be honest, but it usually ends up being anywhere from 1 hour to 3 hours of practice. Hard to fit in the 40min for violin and the woodwinds I am learning for fun.
#13
Technique with metronome.
Rhythm exercises
Improv. Lately it's been over the B section to rhythm changes.
Comping.
Any songs I have to learn for the cover band.
Ear training.
Random noodling. You come up with some good insights doing this.
Transcribing.
Practice what I transcribed

I would like to say composing but I've been slacking off with that lately.

I don't usually get to all of this. I do as much as I can.
#15
Check out Guitar Aerobics by Troy Nelson. Gives you one thing to practice every day for a whole year.
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#16
Quote by Jet Penguin
Wolf, if you are gonna play with dim chords you gotta get that WH scale going. Who needs MM when you have the almighty dim(maj7) chord? Johnny Smith's favorite!


yeppers..but due to the whole tone flavor of the MM..i use the whole tone scale and tritone scale in some nice patterns that work right in with some of the modes (3 & 4 mostly) in MM .. it takes away the predictability of the dim scale
#17
Oh most definitely! The main challenge of the dim. scale is NOT using it in a symmetrical (and therefore predictable) way.

There are just so many possible 3 and 4 note sonorities in the scale; I goof around with those often.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
Last edited by Jet Penguin at Oct 25, 2014,
#18
Now a days I either:

Learn a song/solo/dissect it. Kind of all happens at the same time.

Just play music.

I barely ever worry about technique anymore. When I used to practice scales and licks my solos would be boring and uninspired.

I found that learning songs and jamming developed my ear, my connection with the instrument (that is knowing how the instrument reacts to my picking technique, where I'm standing w/ regards to the amp, etc) and my technique.
#19
I don't always do this, but this is what I usually aim for:

Listen to the tune I want to practice
Learn the themes and chords if I haven't already done so
Play it in all 12 keys
Play the appropriate scales/arps etc. that I want to use over the changes in time with the song
Imitate an excerpt that I like of the solos, learn the logic behind it and try to apply it to my own playing
Solo over the tune with my own ideas and with the ideas I just learned

I'm also keen to do some big band arranging these holidays now. I've only been composing stuff I've been required to do for varsity and not what I really want to
#21
I just tend to practice a song or concept I want to incorporate until I have it down pretty well. I don't like to practice exercises much because I find they are not easily incorporated into ideas and improvisations. The best way for me is to isolate a lick or song structure that I want to use and practice it going through the circle of fourths. This way, there is a complete understanding of the concept all over the instrument. I just don't have time to spend endless hours on useless exercises that are not musical.
#23
At this point trying always to keep working on:

- Technique (always to be in shape)
- Improvisation (Signature Style)
- Composing
#25
Quote by HomerSGR
I don't practice. I play. No structure, just when I feel like it. No, I wouldn't have been a better guitarplayer had I structured some idiotic "practice routine". I would have quit.

huu