#1
I recently put a gotoh tune o matic bridge on my squier VM mustang, at the lowest the action is super high, so I figured shimming might be the next move. I picked up some basswood 1/16" thick from a hobby shop, but it took 2 pieces to get it to a decent point. The strings are still sitting around 3mm from the top of the 12th fret from low E to high E. I'd ideally like to get it a little lower, but I'm doubting whether adding any more wood to the neck pocket will be good for the instrument. Any advice on where to go from here is appreciated!
#2
Quote by indisguise
I recently put a gotoh tune o matic bridge on my squier VM mustang, at the lowest the action is super high


Next step is to remove the Gotoh and save it for something else.
Why did you think this was a good idea?
#3
Stradivarius used three nails to hold the necks on his violins,so there's nothing magical about fixing necks.
I would just add more shims - I'm pretty arbitrary about things like that. Paddle-pop sticks are a good candidate. If I was being keen I would build up the bottom of the neck pocket with epoxy putty, the stuff they use for bedding gun barrels.
#4
That or countersink the Gotoh. Wouldn't that be easier?

Or maybe sub in a Mastery Bridge.

#5
Quote by dspellman
Next step is to remove the Gotoh and save it for something else.
Why did you think this was a good idea?


The stock bridge is shit, after you adjust the individual saddles and play for awhile, they start getting out of place and start falling shorter. Unless you think putting some thread locker on them after adjusting would work, which idk how I feel about.

I figured the tune o matic would relieve me of that nonsense the stock bridge gave me, but these shims got me worried chief. The mastery is nice but too much, this is just a squier mustang, not a rolex :P
Last edited by indisguise at Oct 23, 2014,
#6
Quote by indisguise
The stock bridge is shit, after you adjust the individual saddles and play for awhile, they start getting out of place and start falling shorter. Unless you think putting some thread locker on them after adjusting would work, which idk how I feel about.



Thread lock (Loctite) might be one solution (friend of mine had one that had rusted itself into a fortunate position). The Mastery might be worth more than the rest of the guitar, of course, but I think there are bridges out there that might work pretty well...
#7
Yeah I think I might give that loctite a go and see what happens. I guess what I'm trying to get at, is there a certain thickness that's too much shim? I've got 1/8th of an inch right now, I've never shimmed an instrument before so I have no idea when it's considered "too much".
#8
as you keep shimming the neck, the increased angle is going to move the bottom of the fret board further and further away from the bridge. This will change the scale. Compensation will become an issue as it may be to long for the TOM to compensate. Even if the TOM saddles will have enough movement, if the scale length is changed enough, you may not be able to get the compensation correct.
#9
Quote by Rusty_Chisel
as you keep shimming the neck, the increased angle is going to move the bottom of the fret board further and further away from the bridge. This will change the scale. Compensation will become an issue as it may be to long for the TOM to compensate. Even if the TOM saddles will have enough movement, if the scale length is changed enough, you may not be able to get the compensation correct.


What we are talking about is shimming the bottom of the neck pocket at the back to increase the tilt of the neck. This has virtually no effect on scale length, since all you are doing is rotating the neck angle with the front of the neck pocket acting as the centre of rotation. - The end of the neck still sits firmly against the back of the neck pocket.
Last edited by Tony Done at Oct 23, 2014,
#10
if you increase the tilt of the neck, you will absolutely move the end of the fretboard away from bridge. this is simple geometry. It sounds like the poster needs significant shimming to get the action he wants. this will come at the cost of intonation.

Instead of shimming to increase the neck angle, he may be better off with a flat shim that raises the entire neck.
#11
Quote by Rusty_Chisel
if you increase the tilt of the neck, you will absolutely move the end of the fretboard away from bridge. this is simple geometry. It sounds like the poster needs significant shimming to get the action he wants. this will come at the cost of intonation.

Instead of shimming to increase the neck angle, he may be better off with a flat shim that raises the entire neck.


I think you're right, a flat shim would be better, or a combination of flat and angle. A tilt of say, 3.0 deg will raise the sight line to the bridge by about 12.5 mm (a lot!) - using my peavey raptor as a model. The cosine of 3.0 degs is 0.99862. With a scale length of 650mm, this amounts to an increase in length of 650/(cos 3.0 degrees) = 1.1mm. That might or might not be out of the intonation range of the saddles.

EDIT. You could always take a bit of the back end of the heel, in the neck pocket where it wouldn't show, to set it further back.
Last edited by Tony Done at Oct 23, 2014,
#12
Thanks for the responses guys! I realized that when making the shims I didnt create an angle on them, so I took out the two and made an angle on one, and I got the perfect action I was looking for around 2mm give or take across the board. The guitar has never played better!
Last edited by indisguise at Oct 23, 2014,