#1
Hi there,
I am having my first taste of professional recording next week and have managed to source 2 bass heads to gain different tones/experiment etc.

I was considering attempting to bi-amp with the heads (one ashdown mag 300, one Marshall), but I'm not sure if it's possible with the cabs I have available.
Any help? The cabs I'll have are:
-ashdown 210
-ashdown 115
-trace 4x10

Cheers in advance,
Josh!
#2
Do you want to run both amps through the same cabinet? If so, could work with the Trace Elliot (if it is one like the 1048H and has two inputs). I don't know about the Ashdown 2x10, but it definitely won't work with the 1x15 alone (for obvious reasons).
#3
Technically bi-amp refers to using 2 amps with an active xover. One amp covers the highs and the other covers the lows. I don't think that is what you intend. You can use as many amps as you have mics to get different tones for recording but about 90% of the pro session bass players I know run DI with a modeling pedal or device. More tonal flexibility, less moving and storage.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Oct 24, 2014,
#4
Quote by jinsu2301
Do you want to run both amps through the same cabinet? If so, could work with the Trace Elliot (if it is one like the 1048H and has two inputs). I don't know about the Ashdown 2x10, but it definitely won't work with the 1x15 alone (for obvious reasons).


Only if the Trace is a stereo cab. With mono cabs, NEVER hook two amps through it. At least one amp won't make it out alive. You use the second jack to daisy chain cabinets.
#5
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Only if the Trace is a stereo cab. With mono cabs, NEVER hook two amps through it. At least one amp won't make it out alive. You use the second jack to daisy chain cabinets.

I assumed the second jack was another input to run the cab stereo (couldn't find any exact info on it) but thanks for clearing that up.
#6
Quote by Puppet_616
Hi there,
I am having my first taste of professional recording next week and have managed to source 2 bass heads to gain different tones/experiment etc.

I was considering attempting to bi-amp with the heads (one ashdown mag 300, one Marshall), but I'm not sure if it's possible with the cabs I have available.
Any help? The cabs I'll have are:
-ashdown 210
-ashdown 115
-trace 4x10

Cheers in advance,
Josh!


Pointless.

1.) Understand that "bi-amping" is the process of using an active crossover ahead of the amplification and sending only highs to one amp and only lows to another.

2.) Understand that you do NOT necessarily get lower lows out of a 115 than you do out of a cabinet with all 10's.

3.) If you're recording, you're better off running your bass directly into the mixing board; avoid the amplification entirely. If you want different sounds, find someone with a Line 6 BASS Pod XT, and run into their amp/cab simulations and from there into the mixing board, or use the Pod as a "re-amping" solution.

4. ) If you're playing live, reconsider your cabinets.

Bass players should generally approach a rig from the opposite direction as guitar players.

First, pick out your cabinets.

My assumption when I added bass to the arsenal a couple of years ago was that I should be looking for something with a single 15" speaker or 4x10's.

After doing the research, I ended up with fEARful 15/6/1's. These are full-range speaker cabinets built around the very special Eminence Kappalite 3015LF and an 18Sound 6.5" mids driver. These are neutral, extremely powerful, don't fart out, and will support a 5-string while being relatively lightweight and relatively compact. One is enough for most gigs. Two will blow almost anything off the stage. You may prefer completely different cabs, but that's where you start.

Since these cabs will handle up to 900W each with an 8 ohm impedance, I actually have two different rigs for them. One is the aforementioned Pod XT BASS plus a Carvin HD1500 (1500W stereo rackmount power amp that, at 9 lbs, will put out 800W bridged, mono, into 8 ohms, or 1400W bridged, mono, into 4 ohms (two cabs). The second is a Carvin BX1500 bass head (same power output as the HD1500, but the bass preamp and EQ is built in, and the whole thing weighs about 10 lbs). Again, these were chosen partly for their suitablity for the cabinets and partly because I liked the sound. Your choices will probably differ.

And after that, the basses are secondary; I have a nothing-special passive 4-string bolt-neck with Precision and Jazz pickups and a Carvin LB75 active pickup 5-string neck-through.
Last edited by dspellman at Oct 24, 2014,
#8
In all honesty, bi-amping a bass simply does not work as advertised. Most bassists who have gigged with a bi-amped rig have found it profoundly disappointing.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#9
Thanks for all the info guys, can someone give me a crash course/for dummies guide to what active crossover is, and how you go about it. Unfortunately I don't know anyone with a line 6 pod and this is my first time recording!
#10
A crossover is a group of components that split an audio signal into two or more parts. A tweeter and a woofer are designed to work best in certain frequency ranges- the ideal single point source driver hasn't been invented yet (although companies like Vienna Acoustics are getting close). So, in order for a driver to receive the frequencies it is designed for, a crossover is involved. In a cabinet with a woofer and tweeter, this crossover sits after the input jack of the cab. It splits the signal so the high frequencies go to the tweeter, and the low frequencies to the woofer. As the crossover is powered by the signal going in, this is a passive crossover. There are multiple orders of passive crossovers, but that gets complicated. You also lose some signal power with a passive crossover, due to the power need of the component being supplied by the audio signal. They are generally low cost. There does exist line level passive crossovers, but I personally dismiss these as next to useless. Passive crossover components interact in complex ways, as well as impedence specific, meaning a passive crossover must be designed with the exact speakers in mind.

An active crossover sits before the amplification stage, and requires two amplifiers to work. The instrument level signal goes into an active crossover, which requires external power as the signal is not strong enough to power the components. The high frequencies goes to one amp and set of speakers, and the lows go to another amp and another set of speakers. Active crossovers are often digital, and allow for fine tuning for different speakers. They also allow the speakers to be directly driven by the amp, improving the amp's damping factor. You also don't lose power to components.

There's also mechanical crossovers, but that doesn't really apply to instrument reproduction, more home audio.
#11
Quote by FatalGear41
In all honesty, bi-amping a bass simply does not work as advertised. Most bassists who have gigged with a bi-amped rig have found it profoundly disappointing.


Depends on what you're looking to achieve. Something like Royal Blood is completely unachievable without bi-amping. But fundamentally I agree, for most bass players is pretty useless.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.
#12
Quote by Deliriumbassist
^Biamping is the use of two amplifiers, regardless of whether an active crossover is used or not.


In the broadest possible sense, yes.

Used that way, it could encompass "stereo" and probably a number of other lash-ups.
Is there a point?

For example, I've seen folks sort of "fake" a crossover by using EQ to run highs through a 4x10 cabinet and lows through a 1x15 (this usually ends up with damage to the 1x15, of course), and I suppose that could technically be called "biamping" as well. Most professionals don't use the term in that manner, however.
Last edited by dspellman at Oct 26, 2014,
#14
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I know Doug Wimbish utilises stereo effects.


And I doubt he calls it biamping rather than simply describing it as stereo.
#17
2 heads = dual amping
1 head containing 2 power amps = bi-amping

My GK, for example, uses an active crossover and sends highs and lows to two different power amps for individual control. Use a 4 pin speakon cord and connect to a cab with a 4 pin jack, the signals stay separated. Grit sounds like shit through a tweeter and instead gets sent to the speakers. There are also bi-amp heads that have both 1/4" high and low jacks.

If you ever want to use 2 heads in a live setting alternately, the thing to do would be to use an ABY splitter.